Ka Haku o Hawaii and Fire Engine Company 4, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

New Member for Number 4.—Recently, His Highness, Ka Haku o Hawaii, became a new member of Engine Company Number 4 [Hui Kinaiahi Helu 4]. We see the young Alii joining in on these fine work. This is an example for others, as if reminding us that we ourselves should join in good endeavors of all sorts, while putting effort into fostering these works, and living properly, and treating well all those with whom we meet. Look to this Example.

(Kuokoa, 1/25/1862, p. 2)

Lala Hou...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 9, Aoao 2. Ianuari 25, 1862.

Restoration Day celebration by true patriots, 1894.

LA HOIHOI EA.

Fitting Remembrances for that Great Day.

This past Tuesday, July 31, was the day that the independence and the beloved flag of this land was restored after being seized and forcefully taken by Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki Pauleti] on February 25, 1843, without orders from his Nation, and Rear-Admiral Thomas [Hope-Adimerala Kamaki] was the one who restored it on this day in that very year, five months and some days after it was stolen. This day is celebrated by all true patriots with many feasts all over the place.

In the early morning, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Puali Puhiohe Lahui] went to entertain the Alii, the Monarch, at Washington Place. When they entered the yard after marching from Emma Square [Ema Kuea], the door was swung open and they marched to the Ewa corner of the house and began to play. The Alii came out and sat on the lanai on that side. The songs that were played were full of reverence, awe, and joy. Outside before the front yard were the masses, and children climbed the fence and went inside. From what we saw, the crowd was looking intensely to try and maybe get a glimpse of the Alii, showing that the songs by the band wasn’t what they desired, but it was the sight of the face and the appearance of the Ruler that they were after, as it is sung: “Our desire is but for our Alii, The one we care for.” [“O ke Alii wale no ka makou makemake, O ka luhi o maua me ia nei.”]

After the music was over, the Alii stood and spoke briefly before these people who stood steadfast behind her, with words of encouragement. She stressed that the lahui keep the peace, like her statement of January 14, 1893, for the welfare of her people, and that it would be but a few more days before, according to assurances she received, that she will once again have them [? e kikoo hou mai ai oia ia lakou] go back to their lives just as before. The Alii had as well some words filled with aloha, and there was not one from amongst the members of the band who did not shed tears; some shed great many tears while blowing their noses into handkerchiefs.

That night, on the grounds of the Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], they gave an open concert to entertain the public, and just as was seen at the performance they put on earlier, so too was this one, and it was very well attended. Those who attended were very happy, there being perhaps 3000, from men to women, from the old to they young, and from those of high stature to low. They played without electric lights, but were illuminated by Japanese lanterns and their pewter lanterns. It would appear as if they were totally thwarted by the Government [P. G.], but in fact it was the deceitful ones who were disappointed, because they were all the more delighted. There was a single wealth-seeking haole [kolea kauahua] that we saw sitting on the lanai of the Hotel, on the Waikiki side, with his mouth wide open, maybe because he witnessed the unmatched beauty of that great night of entertainment, that person was the one with a maimed hand from Boston.

[Let the story never be forgotten. Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono!]

(Makaainana, 8/6/1894, p. 1)

LA HOIHOI EA.

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Augate 6, 1894.

W. D. Alexander on Restoration Day, 1896.

A MEMORABLE DAY

Admiral Thomas Declines the Provisional Cession of the Islands.

Professor Alexander’ Brief But Graphic Description of the Important Events of 1843

On the 10th of February 1843, the British frigate Carysfort, commanded by Lord George Paulet, arrived at Honolulu, and showed displeasure by withholding the usual salutes. The commander seems to have placed himself completely under the direction of Mr Alexander Simpson. The United States sloop-of-war Boston, Captain Long, arrived on the 13th.

The king who had been sent for at Lord Paulet’s request, arrived from Lahaiua on the 16th. Lord Paulet refused to treat with him through Dr. Judd, his agent, and late in the evening of the 17th sent him a peremptory letter, inclosing six demands with the threat that if they were not complied with by four o’clock p. m. the next day, “immediate coercive steps would be taken.” The substance of these demands was as follows:

1st. That an attachment laid on Charlton’s property, at the suit of an English firm for an old debt, be removed, that the land claimed by him be “restored,” and reparation to his representatives for the losses which they had suffered through the alleged injustice of the government.

2d. The immediate recognition of Mr. Simpson as British Consul, and a salute of twenty-one guns to the British flag.

3d. A guarantee that no British subject should be put in irons, unless for a felony.

4th. That a new trial should be held in the case of Skinner vs. Dominis.

5th. That all disputes between British subjects and others be referred to mixed juries, one half of whom should be British subjects approved by the consul.

6th. A direct communication between the king and the Acting British Consul for the immediate settlement of all complaints on the part of British subjects. Continue reading

Restoration Day, 1896.

The Independent recalls the fact that to-day is Restoration day. It reprints on its first page Professor Alexander’s description of the incidents attaching to it. If inaccurate in detail, it is worth reading and is suggestive to thoughtful persons at the present time. The government in control forgets the day, but Hawaiians remember and respect it, and in a few years time will again observe and honor it.

[Tomorrow will be the 171st anniversary of the restoration of the Kingdom.]

(Independent, 7/31/1896, p. 2)

 

The Independent recalls...

The Independent, Volume III, Number 340, Page 2. July 31, 1896.

Kaulia’s invitation to Morgan, 1897.

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

ANTI-ANNEXATIONIST LEADER SIGNS INVITATION.

Says His People are Anxious to Learn From the Veteran Senator What Annexation Would Mean to Them.

Senator Morgan has accepted the invitation of the native Hawaiians to address them in public meeting upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States.

Among the signers of the invitation is James K. Kaulia, president of the Hawaiian Patriotic League and president of the Aloha Aina Society. Mr. Kaulia is bitterly opposed to annexation and he is at the head of the opposition among his own countrymen. It was Mr. Kaulia who was largely instrumental in getting a few Hawaiians to gather in an abortive mass meeting at the Union Square last month, and adopt the resolutions protesting against annexation which Mr. Kaulia afterwards at the head of a committee of fifteen presented to President Dole and his Cabinet.

Mr. Kaulia states that he as well as the members of the societies he represents are anxious to hear Senator Morgan and they are truly grateful to him that he has consented to speak.

The invitation sent to the Senator, as well as the signers, is a follows:

“Honolulu, Sept. 24, 1897.

“To Senator John T. Morgan, City:

“We the undersigned native Hawaiians desire very much to hear you in an address upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States and particularly desire your views as to the condition of the native Hawaiians and the position they would occupy under closer political relations with the United States.

“We therefore invite you to deliver a public address to the Hawaiians in this city at your convenience upon the above subjects, and if you accept, will make all necessary provisions for the holding of the meeting.

“Yours very respectfully,

“D. L. NAONE,
“J. KALUA KAHOOKANO,
“J. M. POEPOE,
“R. W. WILCOX,
“JOHN LOT KAULUKOU,
“JAMES K. KAULIA,
“President Hawaiian Patriotic League and President Aloha Aina Society.
“S. M. KAAUKAI.”

The meeting will be held on Thursday evening, at the Opera House, and Senator Morgan states that he will treat the question to the best of his ability.

(Hawaiian Star, 9/28/1897, p. 1)

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

The Hawaiian Star, Volume IV, Number 1386, Page 1. September 28, 1897.

More on Kaulia and Morgan, 1897.

DISAVOWAL.

Kaulia Censured for Signing the Request to Senator Morgan.

This will certify that Mr. James K. Kaulia, as President of the Hawaiian Patriotic League, had no authority to sign the invitation to the Hon. John T. Morgan to address Hawaiians on the subject of Annexation. The signature of Mr. Kaulia is his personal matter, not as President of our Association.

J. K. Kaunamano,
James L. Aholo,
M. Palau,
E. W. Palau,
S. K. Kaloa,
D. W. Kamaliikane,
G. W. Kualaku,
S. W. Kawelo,
E. K. Lilikalani.

Executive Committee.

(Independent, 9/29/1897, p. 2)

DISAVOWAL.

The Independent, Volume V, Number 701, Page 2. September 29, 1897.

On ice and challenges and such, 1919 / timeless.

On Assisting Destitute Hawaiians

O True Hawaiians, rise, stand, and give a helping hand of aloha, oh to you, Hawaii’s own, the flesh of your flesh, the bone of your bone. Call out in welcome, feed, and nourish them, so they may make it through the days of hunger.

We are a number of true Hawaiians joining together to freely help our own facing hardship and difficulty in making a living; those who we do not know, in their poor and destitute condition. Therefore we ask by way of the one named later, for assistance from our fellow kanaka and wealthy people who have aloha for you, O Hawaii’s own, to give their donations to our office in the Japanese Fish Market on the upper side of Kekaulike Street, and there will be shown the truth of this plea before you, the people, and it is there that we will stay to make it understood to each and every fellow kanaka.

Just as with the pleas of the Red Cross (Kea Ulaula), Thrift Stamps (Pooleka Kaua), Liberty Bonds (Bona Kuokoa), to which we Hawaiians gave freely to those of foreign lands; this is our own Hawaiian people who are living in poverty, widows, and elderly who were kicked out by those who are responsible under the Law for their care, that being the Board of Health, and for that reason, we announce before you all, O True Hawaiians, come see us with aloha for the good of our own people living in poverty.

We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul-We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things.¹

JOHN E. KAHOOKAUMAHA.

¹This is the thirteenth article in the Mormon articles of faith.

(Kuokoa, 3/28/1919, p. 2)

NO KE KOKUA ANA I NA HAWAII ILIHUNE.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 13, Aoao 2. Maraki 28, 1919.

[The Aloha Aina also ran this announcement, but by this time, the typesetting done in this newspaper was not carefully done. There are frequent typesetting errors throughout. This can be seen in the parallel announcement found below.

One striking change however found in the Aloha Aina announcement is the phrase: “ka Papa Make (ka Papa Ola)” replacing “ka papa ola,” where they refer to the Board of Health as “the Board of Death”.]

No ke Kokou ana Ina Hawaii Ilihune

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXXIV, Helu 12, Aoao 4. Maraki 28, 1919.