William Nevins Armstrong, 1894.

WHO IS HE?

Mr. W. N. Armstrong

Again.

Mr. W. N. Armstrong has adopted the position of lecture and political teacher in the country and we have no doubt that he feels very proud of the audience that gathers around him in the Club and in the League. We have received a number of communications asking us who this Mr. Armstrong is an although his importance—as viewed by himself—has never dazzled our optics we are able  to furnish a little information about this would be professer in national and political science as far as his connections with the Hawaiian Government is concerned. Continue reading

Rev. Robert Stewart McArthur rails on the monarchy, 1895.

M’ARTHUR ON HAWAII.

Kalakaua and Liliuokalani Responsible for Heathenism.

CONVERTS AMONG THE NATIVES.

Great Hopes for the Hawaiians Now that They Are in the Enjoyment of a Pure and Free Government—Officers of State are Especially Praised.

NEW YORK, Dec. 2.—The Rev. Robert Stewart McArthur delivered a sermon in the Calvary Baptist church last night on “The Responsibility of Kalakaua and Liliuokalani.”

After referring to the characteristics of the Hawaiians he quoted figures to show the falling off in the number of Christian converts among the natives since the reign of Kamehameha V, who removed all restraint from the Hula masters and Kahuna influence and thereby sided the spread of idolatry. Continue reading

Anna Berry, daughter of Kentucky congressman, speaks on annexation, 1898.

THE INJUSTICE OF ANNEXATION

As Viewed by an American Woman Miss Anna E Berry of Newport—The Kentucky Congressman’s Daughter Writes Entertainingly of the Native Hawaiians—A Petition to the President.

[Among the ladies who accompanied the congressional party to Hawaii in September was Miss Anna Berry, daughter of Congressman Berry of Kentucky, who has written charmingly of the islands. She brought back many souvenirs of her visit, which are to be seen in her Newport home. The best of all is the Royal Hawaiian standard, the flag which was floating over Queen Liliuokalani when she was deposed. It is to be noted that Miss Berry returned to America with a woman’s sense of the injustice of annexation, from the viewpoint of the native Hawaiian, while the men of the party came back a unit for annexation. The Hawaiian minister to whom Miss Berry refers as a descendant of a Kentucky Governor is Rev. Desha, of Hilo. His grandfather was Governor Desha, of Kentucky, and his father was Isaac B. Desha, who committed a sensational murder at Doggett’s Tavern, a well-known inn of early Kentucky days on the Licking River. The murderer was sentenced to death, and saved by his own father’s pardoning power. The case was one of the most remarkable in American criminal history. He fled to Hawaii where one of his half-native sons is a leading Kanaka minister, and the other is a postal employee.—The Editor of the Kentucky Post.

The recent visit of Senator Morgan and four members of the United States House of Representatives to the Hawaiian Islands aroused among the various peoples of the “Paradise of the Pacific” sentiments and feelings as opposite as the poles. There are indeed various peoples in Hawaii—a very scrapbag of a population—the good with the bad. Here Portuguese and Chinese, Japanese and Germans, Americans and natives jostle one another. Continue reading

Sanford B. Dole, the Congregationalists, and Annexation, 1902.

THE HAWAIIAN SITUATION.

On Monday evening, April 28 last, Governor Dole was the guest of the Congregational Club of Boston. Elsewhere in this issue will be found a sketch made by Dole of the Hawaiian situation. It is characteristic of the man. Having the full support of the Administration behind him he is not afraid to say in public what he has been thinking in private for many long years. Let us see and take up his points one by one.

Point No. 1.—”The monarchy was overthrown and annexation was accomplished for the sake of good government for the islands; that is, for their benefit.”—It is true! Annexation was accomplished, by a handful of Congregationalists because the reciprocity treaty between the United States and Hawaii was in imminent danger of being abrogated. The monarchy was overthrown, so as to save the $40 per ton duty on sugar. It was then as it is now for the Congregationalists:—Money before principle.

Point No. 2:—”We have given you everything we have by being annexed.”—That is, Sanford B. Dole, and his Congregationalist friends have given to the United States that which did not belong to them. With the help of an American cruiser, American marines and an American Minister, they have robbed the native Hawaiians of their country so as to enable a few Congregationalist planters to keep up receiving big dividends from their sugar stocks which would have been materially cut down had a $40 duty been imposed upon each ton of sugar. The Springfield Republican adds the following comment to Point No. 2: “But the second point that they have given us all they have is not at all consistent with his first point that they sought Annexation for the benefit of the Islands, and it shows that they are still trying to work the United States for the benefit of the Hawaiians.” Continue reading

Mafia? 1893.

AN AMERICAN MAFIA.

“The Queen never will be restored to the throne, for she will be shot within 24 hours, and every man who takes office under her will be shot also—we have men secretly sworn to do it.”

Such was the remark made to the writer by a brainless young sprig of the “citizens reserve,” such is the tenor of numerous open threats of the canaille composing the annexation club, the citizens reserve and the American league organizations that pretending to be patriotically American are in fact veritable nests of socialism, fenianism and mafia.

To their shame be it said that these mafias are organized under men calling themselves Americans, men who heretofore have been regarded as respectable and intelligent citizens: Hatch, Castle, Wilder, Jones, Smith, McGrew, Emerson, and so on, whose names will pass into history as knavish pirates in a plot to steal a nation and compel America to receive the stolen goods.

A recent article in the Holomua warned that a wave of insanity had struck Honolulu in accordance with a well known theory of cycles. The malady appears to be growing worse, for certain it is, that all the men and women concerned in the overthrow of the Queen, the terrorism and misgovernment of a P. G. military despotism, and the present display of hostilities against the United States, all act like people demented. Continue reading

Kaulia’s invitation to Morgan, 1897.

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

ANTI-ANNEXATIONIST LEADER SIGNS INVITATION.

Says His People are Anxious to Learn From the Veteran Senator What Annexation Would Mean to Them.

Senator Morgan has accepted the invitation of the native Hawaiians to address them in public meeting upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States.

Among the signers of the invitation is James K. Kaulia, president of the Hawaiian Patriotic League and president of the Aloha Aina Society. Mr. Kaulia is bitterly opposed to annexation and he is at the head of the opposition among his own countrymen. It was Mr. Kaulia who was largely instrumental in getting a few Hawaiians to gather in an abortive mass meeting at the Union Square last month, and adopt the resolutions protesting against annexation which Mr. Kaulia afterwards at the head of a committee of fifteen presented to President Dole and his Cabinet.

Mr. Kaulia states that he as well as the members of the societies he represents are anxious to hear Senator Morgan and they are truly grateful to him that he has consented to speak.

The invitation sent to the Senator, as well as the signers, is a follows:

“Honolulu, Sept. 24, 1897.

“To Senator John T. Morgan, City:

“We the undersigned native Hawaiians desire very much to hear you in an address upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States and particularly desire your views as to the condition of the native Hawaiians and the position they would occupy under closer political relations with the United States.

“We therefore invite you to deliver a public address to the Hawaiians in this city at your convenience upon the above subjects, and if you accept, will make all necessary provisions for the holding of the meeting.

“Yours very respectfully,

“D. L. NAONE,
“J. KALUA KAHOOKANO,
“J. M. POEPOE,
“R. W. WILCOX,
“JOHN LOT KAULUKOU,
“JAMES K. KAULIA,
“President Hawaiian Patriotic League and President Aloha Aina Society.
“S. M. KAAUKAI.”

The meeting will be held on Thursday evening, at the Opera House, and Senator Morgan states that he will treat the question to the best of his ability.

(Hawaiian Star, 9/28/1897, p. 1)

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

The Hawaiian Star, Volume IV, Number 1386, Page 1. September 28, 1897.

The Independent speaks out, 1897.

Ed. The Independent:—

“The little knot of noisy royalists,” as the Star chooses to call the overwhelming majority of the legal voters of 1892, numbering about 15,000, who in the near future will be called upon to decide by a plebiscite as to the form of government they wish to live under is now by the natural whirl of events fast approaching their object. When the far astray Alabama Senator arose and advocated the passing of the annexation bill at the closing of the last session of Congress, no notice was taken of him, but the bill was laid over until the December term, to be killed in short order, for the following reasons. In the first place the American people excepting a few cranks of the Stevens and Morgan stamp, had far rather have Hawaii as an independent nation than annex it. The silent mutterings of Russia, Germany and France against America annexing the islands, with England quietly watching and enjoying the game, as she well knows, that the moment America reaches out in mid-ocean land grabbing, that moment dies the Monroe doctrine, which America now foresees. Tempest in a teapot, this little fuss and feathers oligarchic trundle bed minority, will end thus: Before next January there will be an understanding between America, England, France and perhaps Germany, for a joint protection of this nation against all other powers. Those nations will then say to Uncle Sam, that we cannot protect a small band of armed traitors against a people who have for the last five years been crying to the world for justice! Therefore, order at once the abrogation of the treaty between Japan and Hawaii, that Hawaii may regulate her plantation labor as the necessity for labor is required, and then in no uncertain tone demand a plebiscite to be taken and see that it is done fairly, which is but simple justice to that doubly wronged nation. That is the play now being prepared to be placed upon the stage of Hawaii, and performed to the admiration and joy of her people.

Au Revoir.

(Independent, 10/16/1897, p. 2)

Ed. The Independent

The Independent, Volume V, Number 716, Page 2. October 16, 1897.