Tandy Kaohu MacKenzie back home, 1932.

TANDY MACKENZIE RETURNS TO HAWAII NEI WITH HIS WIFE

With the landing of the steamship Montery in town, Tandy Mackenzie, the famous singer, came home accompanied by his wife to spend a month on vacation before returning back to America and perhaps going all the way to Italy.

The successful singing performances given by Tandy Mackinzie at theaters in California boosted his singing popularity.

While here in town, they will be staying at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, and before the couple goes back to America, his friends here want him to put on a concert so that people here have a chance to hear his beautiful singing voice.

[Check out this nice biography found on the Kamehameha Schools Archives page! They have some pretty cool information up about the history of Kamehameha Schools and its graduates if you do some clicking around.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 12/8/1932, p. 2)

HULI HOI MAI O TANDY MACKENZIE NO HAWAII NEI ME KANA WAHINE

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 5, Helu 32, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 8, 1932.

Tandy Kaohu MacKenzie in concert on Kauai, 1922.

Tandy Kaohu MacKenzie

Hawaii’s Famous Lyric Tenor

A Young Hawaiian Singer

IN CONCERT ON KAUAI

Tip Top Theatre – – – Saturday, July 22

Waimea Hall – – – Monday, July 24

Kilauea Hall – – – Tuesday, July 25

Reserved Seats $1.50  General Admission $1.00

(Garden Island, 7/18/1922, p. 8)

Tandy Kaohu MacKenzie

The Garden Island, Volume 18, Number 31, Page 8. July 18, 1922.

Building for movies and entertainment to be built in Kalaupapa, 1915.

ANNOUNCEMENT

Because of the benevolence of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], by them taking up the building of a Movie and Entertainment House for the Patient Colony [Kahua Ma’i] here, we therefore revoke our Requests put out by us to the Fundraising Committees which were approved by us. As for the Committees that collected money for this endeavor, please send it to the Secretary of the Committee, Mr. Joseph Aiona, or to the Superintendent [Lunanui] of this Patient Colony, Mr. J. D. McVeigh.

By way of the Committee, the people of the Patient Colony send their boundless thanks to the Fundraising Committees [Komite Ohi Dala] for this work, and to all those who gave their donation. May God bless us all in the Name of Jesus, Amen.  JOSEPH AIONA,

Secretary.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/30/1915, p. 3)

OLELO HOOLAHA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 10, Helu 30, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 30, 1915.

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

Kamehameha V’s birthday and an opportunist, 1871.

PASSENGER HORSE CARRIAGE.

In response to the many entertainments on the birthday of the King, that being this coming Monday, I therefore want to take those who want to go to Kulaokahua to watch the horse races, on my horse carriage. The fare is a quarter to go and a quarter to return. Find me at the corner of King Street and Nuuanu Avenue.  W. D. RAYMOND.

Honolulu, Dec. 9, 1871.

(Kuokoa, 12/9/1871, p. 3)

KAA LIO LAWE OHUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke X, Helu 49, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 9, 1871.

Babe Ruth at the Honolulu Stadium, 1933.

BABE RUTH WILL EXHIBIT HIS TALENTS HERE

Babe Ruth, the foremost champion at baseball, and the greatest batter, constantly making homeruns in a majority of the games he is in, will play in an exhibition on this coming Sunday, October 22 at the ball field of Kamoiliili, being that the negotiations for his actually playing here in Honolulu on the day shown above went well.

The people who are into baseball are talking about this game to be played by this baseball champ in Honolulu nei. The price [kaki] for entrance to see the game has not been announced, but it is certain that the fee will be a blow [kanono], because the expense to bring this man here to Honolulu is great, and we hear that his family will be coming to Honolulu as well.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 10/19/1933, p. 4)

E HOIKEIKE ANA O BABE RUTH I KANA KALENA MAANEI NEI

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 6, Helu 25, Aoao 4. Okatoba 19, 1933.

Bebe Ruth in Hawaii, 1933.

BABE RUTH ASKED TO PLAY TO BALL GAMES HERE IN HONOLULU

There recently were discussions pertaining to the asking of the king of baseball, Babe Ruth [Bebe Ruth], the champion batter of America for many years in the past until this year, to get him to agree to play two games here in Honolulu at the Kamoiliili ball field this upcoming October 21 and 22.

Mr. Herb Hunter, a ball player promoter, spoke with J. Ashman Biven [J. Ashman Beaven], the one who leases out the ball field, about bringing the champion batter here and playing two games [kemu].

These two gentlemen recently spoke to work out the football game schedule since all the days good for football games are booked from now until the beginning of next year.

This is the highest paid player on his team. He gets paid seventy thousand a season for playing. It is a little more sometimes or little less sometimes.

(Kuokoa, 9/28/1933, p. 3)

NOIIA O BEBE RUTH E PAANI I ELUA KEMU KINIPOPO MA HONOLULU NEI

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 6, Helu 22, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 28, 1933.