One more story from Kalaupapa, 1906.

QUARTERLY HOIKE OF THE SUNDAY SCHOOL OF “KANAANA HOU.”

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Honolulu, T. H.

Please insert the activities of the Hoike of the Sunday School of Kanaana Hou, at 9:30 a. m. the activities began, led by L. M. Painamu, assistant Kahu of the Sunday School.

Group Hymn, 36 L. H.;¹ prayer by Rev. D. Kaai; group hymn, 39 L. H.

Hoike of the Men’s Class, led by W. Paoa; speech by Mrs. Lono Lee Shu; hymn 193 L. H., led by Youth; women’s class, led by

J. Kiaaina; speech, Elia Kaaihue; hymn 126 L. H., led by the Youth; Ahahui H. K.² class, led by Mrs. A. Unea; hymn 126 L. H., led by the Youths (f).

Donations from the Sunday School, led by J. K. Keliihuli, $13.65; hymn 191 L. H., led by the women; Youth (m) class, led by J. K. Waiamau; speech, William Notley; hymn 20, L. H., led by the Aha H. K.; youth (f) class, led by J. K. Keliikuli; hymn 88, L. H., led by the men.

Messages of encouragement—J. K. Waiamau, J. K. Keliikuli, S. K. Kaunamano, of the parochial class, led by Kahu Rev. D. Kaai with this class for the entire congregation. Closing Hymn, 30 L. H.; closing prayer, Rev. D. Kaai.

May it please you that the number of students at this hoike were 44: 7 men, 14 women, 11 boys, 12 girls, and 58 visitors, for a total of 102. The exercise went well, and they were filled with joy for Christ, and it was carried out peacefully.

With appreciation,

NAIHE KALA.

¹”L. H.” most likely is an abbreviation of the hymnal just published in 1902 by the Hawaiian Evangelical Association, “Leo Hoonani”.

²”Aha H. K.” is short for “Ahahui Hooikaika Karistiano,” which is the “Christian Endeavor Society,” also seen as “C. E.”.

[Many of the names that were mentioned tonight at the talk put on at Native Books appear in this report!]

(Kuokoa, 10/19/1906, p. 6)

HOIKE HAPAHA O KE KULA SABATI O "KANAANA HOU."

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV,Helu 42, Aoao 6. Okatoba 19, 1906.

Kokua being sent out of Kalaupapa, 1903.

Desire to Live in Kalaupapa

According to reports, most of the assistants [kokua] and the people who have been diagnosed not to have leprosy have requested of the Board of Health to remain in Kalaupapa.

Amongst these requests, four have staunchly opposed their being removed from the place of the sick. In accordance with the thought of the Board of Health, some requests were granted while others were denied.

The petitions of Mrs. Jessie Kaeana and Mrs. Lahela Amaka for their husbands to go to the colony as kokua were approved, and Superintendent McVeigh [Lunanui Maka-we] helped in this.

C. Kopena, a kokua that was ordered by the Board of Health to leave, asked that the decision be changed. The Board of Health gave the 31st of August as his last day to live in the colony. Kopena stated that he lived there for a long time and has not in the least gone against the Board of Health. When he left for the colony, he sold all of his assets, believing that he would spend the rest of his days there; and now, he is unable to return to the outside world unless he has supplies. If the Board is set upon his leaving, he needs to be given a home outside, and if not, he will become a vagabond of the earth.

According to Superintendent McVeigh, Kopena refuses to work, and has tried to join in with the rest of the kokua to defy the power of the Board of Health. For this reason, the request was denied.

McVeigh stated that when telling Kopena the Board of Health decided to remove him from the colony, Kopena said, “ko ke hele”¹, and that he would be staying.

That was not the case of Mr. and Mrs. Imihia. They asked the Board to allow the two of them to live there because they have no ohana left living, and they don’t have enough money to sustain them for two days.

Mr. McVeigh asked that they live in the colony and he said that Imihia works hard and is a farmer. The request was approved.

The request of Simms was denied for him to continue living in the colony, because he was suspected of having leprosy, but he will be released after he receives his clearance.

According to the explanation of McVeigh, Simms is one of the most lazy blacks that he has seen, and he should be sent out to work for himself.

The request of Sam Kaaiko and his wife was approved to go to the colony to visit their child.

Mrs. H. K. Aylett’s request was denied to take her young child to the colony.

¹Hawaiianization of the phrase, “go to hell.”

(Kuokoa, 8/7/1903, p. 3)

Ua Makemake e Noho i Kalaupapa

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 32, Aoao 3. Augate 7, 1903.

A father at Kalaupapa loses a son far away, 1903.

My Beloved Lei, My Child, Has Passed.

Mr. Editor of the newspaper Ke Aloha Aina.

Aloha oe:—May it please your honor to allow me some space of our precious “nupepa” for my bundle of sadness for which the title appears above, so that the friends of my child who live in the wafting Eka wind of that calm land may know.

In the evening of Friday, July 31, 1903, in Kailua, North Kona, Hawaii, the angel of death came to take the soul of my dear son, Jacob Kaleoalii, and he left silently alone on the path of no return, leaving behind his body for his mother and younger siblings to grieve over. Continue reading

Brother Dutton on Molokai, 1911.

25 Years on Molokai.

Last Saturday, the friends of Bro. J. R. Dutton celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of his living at the sanatorium at Molokai, where he chose to be amongst the patients, and to teach them of the kingdom of heaven and the righteousness of the spirit.

Bro. Dutton was invited to come to Hawaii as a result of his desire to minister on Molokai amongst the people afflicted with leprosy; and it is true, from the moment he stepped upon the soil of Kalawao, until living there for 25 years, there was not a single moment he spent away, but he remained there at Kalawao at the Baldwin Boys’ Home at all times, as if he made this his home.

In his many years living there, there was only a single time he showed signs of grief, when he climbed into the hills many years ago, his eyes looked out to the wide ocean, and he returned immediately to the Baldwin Home to his room. He then began to write. However, it is unknown what happened that day, except through conjecture.

Bro. Dutton was a soldier engaged in a fierce battle between the north and the south; and he saw the dead bodies of his comrades in battle. He visited the graves of his many friends, and he remains a member of the soldiers of the Republic.

(Kuokoa, 8/4/1911, p. 5)

PIHA KA 25 MAKAHIKI MA MOLOKAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 31, Aoao 5. Augate 4, 1911.

More on ’93 KS graduate, Abraham Pihi, 1898.

MY DEAR SWEETHEART HAS JUST PASSED, AND MY EMOTIONAL SUPPORT HAS BEEN TAKEN AWAY.

Mr. Editor.

Aloha oe:

Should it be satisfactory to you and your workers, here is my bundle of olive leaves that is placed above, so that our many loved ones living all the way from Haehae where the sun rises to the pleasant base of Lehua where the sun sets may see it.

My beloved has gone, my companion who I would talk with in days gone by, that is my beloved man, Mr. Aprahama Pihi, who is a native and a familiar one of the land famous for the “Kanilehua” [Hilo] and the fragrant bowers of hala of Puna, and the land of the Haao Rains [Kaʻū], that is the roots of my dear husband who left me, his companion, his wife, grieving at the side of his grave. Auwe! How dreadful. Abraham Pihi was born in Puueo, Hilo, Hawaii on the 5th of January, 1872, of E. P. Hoaai (m) and Lilia Palapala (f), and the two of them had 7 children: 5 daughters and 2 sons; and 2 of them went off in search of the footprints of their parents, and 5 remain mourning on this side: 4 girls and one boy.

He was educated at the Hilo Boarding School under the principal, Rev. W. R. Oleson [W. R. Olesona]¹. After he was done there, he entered Kamehameha School in 1893. He was at that school for 1 year, but because it was learned that he had the disease that separates families, he asked the principal, that being the Rev. W. R. Oleson, to release him. He returned to Wailuku, Maui, where his mother was living with his new father, the Rev. S. Kapu; he lived with his parents until he was taken in by the disease that separates families; he was taken from his parents and his younger siblings. He was taken away to this land of no friends in 1895. The number of years he had in this world was 24 and eleven months and 13 days, when his last breath was released. Continue reading

More Hawaiian-Language in English newspapers, 1922.

HE MELE NO JOHN WISE

A he ohohia nui no Keoni Waika
Ka elele hiwahiwa a ka lahui
Hui like mai kakou
E koho me ka lokahi.

Hookahi mea nui i anoi ia
O ka pono kaulike o ka lehulehu
Mai Hawaii o Keawe
A Kauai o Mano.

Ua kini ua mano kou aloha
Maluna hoi a o kou lahui
A he sure maoli
Pela io nohoi.

Kiina ko lei i Wakinekona
A ka manu aeko e hii mai nei
Nau hoi ia la elei
No ka nani a o Hawaii.

Eia makou mahope ou
A hiki aku i ka lanakila ana
Goodie idea kela
Lokahi na puuwai.

Hainaia mai ana ka puana
A o oe ka makou i anoi ai
John Wise no ka elele
Feelah goodie kahi manao.

—ILIHIA CLUB, Kalaupapa.

[Chronicling America only has newspapers up to 1922. I am not sure how much longer Hawaiian-Language articles appear in the Maui News, but it is pretty interesting to see that they did appear until at least 1922. Here is a political song written for Keoni Waika, the renaissance man, John Wise.]

(Maui News, 11/3/1922, p. 8)

HE MELE NO JOHN WISE

Semi-Weekly Maui News, 22nd. Year, Number 1215, Page 8. November 3, 1922.

Bonine brings movies to Kalawao and Kalaupapa, 1909.

FIRST MOVING PICTURE SHOW TAKES SETTLEMENT BY STORM

On Thursday evening last a new miracle happened at Kalaupapa. On that evening R. K. Bonine, the moving-picture expert, threw his first picture on the screen before an audience of a thousand lepers, and there was a great gasp of awed astonishment and keen delight when the pictures really moved and did things. Cheers, tears, gasps and soul-satisfying laughter greeted the pictures in turn, and when the reels put aside for the first entertainment had been exhausted, the people of Kalaupapa and Kalawao, in a body, cheered their thanks to the man who had brought these wonders to them and to those in Honolulu who had through their contributions made these miracles possible.

It was a great day for the people of the Molokai Settlement, and it was a great day for Bonine. To the lepers had come a new marvel, greater far than the sight of the mighty White Fleet, which maneuvered past their shores last summer, greater than anything that had come to them. No place the world over have motion pictures made such a hit. Continue reading