Complaint against police officers in Kalaupapa, 1903.

RESPONSE TO THE POLICE OF KALAUPAPA.

Mr. Editor of Ke Aloha Aina,

Aloha oe:—

May it please your honorable to allow me the mouth of our cannon, and may you flash so that the honored members of the Legislature may see this:

The officers of Kalaupapa nei have made a petition asking the Legislature to increase their salary to $30 per month, being that their current pay is just $20; the asking of the officers for $30 a month is very questionable. What great work do we see them doing; is it going around to the homes of the patients and entering without search warrants, or when the Sheriff gives them orders, these officers do as they please?

They brush aside the orders from their Sheriff and return; they did not put their petition before their head, J. K. Waiamau [Deputy Superintendent], and I hear that they were all admonished; I truly believe that $20 a month is enough for them.

Here is another thing, your writer has heard that five kokua are being sent out, two men and three women. They have only two weeks to ready their belongings. Our Superintendent [McVeigh] is bristling.  I stop my pen here, and to the metal typesetting boys goes my greeting of good-bye all.

H. K. AKAMU.

Kalaupapa, Molokai, April 21, 1903.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 8)

HE PANE I NA MAKAI O KALAUPAPA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 8. Aperila 25, 1903.

Let the old men go forth and lie upon the roads… 1895.

“LAW OF THE PADDLE BLOW.”
[“MAMALAHOE KANAWAI.”]

This above are the initial words of the very first law promulgated in the communities of Hawaii, and those words spoken by one in authority still remain. Here below is the the law in its entirety:

“MAMALAHOE KANAWAI—Let the old men go forth and lie upon the roads; let the old women go forth and lie upon the roads; let the children go forth and lie upon the roads.”

This first law was proclaimed by Paiea (Kamehameha I) after his head was struck by some fishermen at the seashore in Puna, Hawaii, because they mistakenly thought he was someone else. When his head was struck with the blow from a canoe paddle, the men fled, there being five of them; that was when Paiea rose, picked up a rock, and made to chase after them, however, his foot was caught in a rock crevice, and his chase was cut short. The rock in his hand fell, and there was no getting it back. And it was this disappointment which caused him to proclaim these famous and powerful words in our history. The place where Paiea’s foot was caught can be seen to this day.

Here, we take what is shown on pages 94 and 95 of “Ka Buke Lapaau me na Mea Pili Kaulana” which was published by Kamaki [Thomas P. Spencer]:¹

“Soon after this battle (Kepuwahaulaula), the fishermen who years earlier struck the head of Kamehameha with a paddle near the sea were brought before him by his officers. This shameful act of theirs was made known to Kamehameha face to face, for which his officers demanded that they be killed by stoning them to death.

“The aloha Kamehameha had for his fellow man was expressed for the first time in his famous pardon by announcing:

“‘Mamalahoe Kanawai: you are prisoners of war, but you are forgiven for unwittingly striking my head–I escaped, but nearly was in trouble.’

“Here, O Reader, do recognize–love for his fellow man was the cure² for which allowed for the release of these rebels of Puna by Kamehameha, and him not giving regard to the calls by his officers to put them to death. This is a fine comparison to President Dole of the Republic; he with his Executive Powers does not come close to a hundredth of the Kanawai Mamalahoe, in his treatment of the Hawaiian prisoners of the revolution of January 17, 1895 who continue to be imprisoned albeit the lahui are united in wanting them released. That was an uncivilized time when [the men] were triumphantly released by Kamehameha, and this is a knowledge and civilization, and yet Dole has not given clemency to the Hawaiian prisoners for the fame of his name and that of his Nation.”

Our elucidation of this famous story is not like that of Spencer’s, but the basis of his explanation of Kamehameha’s forgiving those who injured him, that is what we want to make clear at this time, so that true love of one’s fellow man is seen by them.

¹This book was republished in 2003 by Bishop Museum Press as: Buke ‘Oihana Lapa’au me na ‘Apu la’au Hawai’i (Book of Medical Practices and Hawaiian Prescriptions). See here for further description.

²”Laau lapaau” [medicinal cure] is the word chosen here because this story appears in a book of traditional medicinal practices.

(Makaainana, 11/25/1895, p. 4)

"MAMALAHOE KANAWAI."

Ka Makaainana, Buke IV—-Ano Hou. Helu 22, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1895.

Jack Kaleiwahea falsely accused? 1893.

KALEIWAHEA.

Some Explanations pertaining to his arrest.

Kaleiwahea has been a kamaaina of the uplands of Kalihi for many years. He has some blemishes by his eyes and mouth. While he was living this way, he was made an adversary by some people and they went to the Board of Health as witnesses saying he had leprosy. A warrant was issued for his arrest and he was captured and taken to the quarantine station of Kalihi. He told some people that he was confined there for six weeks without being examined, along with some other patients. One day some people told him that he was going to be taken to Molokai without being examined.

Therefore, one day a thought grew within him without considering the power of the Board of Health, and thinking of his own accord that he did not have leprosy, he escaped and ran away to free himself and went to the mountains, until the valley of Waimea. Later it was heard that he fled, and the order was given to the Deputy Sheriffs in response to his escape, to capture him if found. He was constantly hunted like a wild animal. He said that he didn’t want to be taken alive. Previously, he did not carry weapons, but after he heard that he was being hunted by the officers, he ran and swam in the ocean, while being chased by officers aboard a canoe, and when the officers were close behind, he grabbed on to the outrigger float [ama] and flipped the canoe, and the officers were thrown into the ocean. The two officers returned to shore without the object of their chase. When it became dark, Kaleiwahea came to shore at Waialua.

From that time, Kaleiwahea was seen carrying a rifle and other weapons, and when the officers came to arrest him once more, he was prepared. The officers told him that they’d come at night to capture him, so he fled to live in the mountains. He said that as long as he was hunted like an animal, he’d not give up. According to some news received, he was living in a very good area in the mountains of Kahuku, where it was better than where Koolau¹ was living, and he could toy with all who appeared before him.

When he heard that he was to be captured again, he fled to the mountains, even if just a few months ago he was living by the sea and working at the dock of Waimea. He was very skilled at that kind of work. But he surmised that the order was given to the District Sheriffs of Waialua and Koolau, not to arrest him, but to let him be until the time was right, then maybe he could be assuaged and his appearance could be looked at. Because according to the people who knew, there were no signs of that disease that separates families [leprosy] upon him.

This below is the letter he wrote to one of his friends, and let it be read with great relish [? onoi nui]:

Camping Place in the Mountains

Kahuku, July 29,

To _______

I received your letter of aloha, and it gave me much hope and happiness, and for the first time, I’ve have an appetite here in my mountain home. I’ve received a lot of news that I’m being hunted after, and last week I was greatly saddened upon hearing that the haole police were coming along with the government troops to go against me, and that they’d shoot me if they can; what is the wrong I have committed that I should be treated that way like an animal? When I heard this, aloha welled up within me for my wife and our newborn baby of two weeks, as well as for my family.  I attempted to go once again and escape my mountain home and give my wife and family my last aloha; and to my wife i said, “The time has come for me to go like a wild animal and return to my mountain home, until i meet with those of which I hear, and it will be then that I fight for life or death, until the very last puffs of smoke from my rifle.” With these words above, I left my home depressed, but when I received your letter to me, it gave me good hope that there will be end to the years of persecution. I shall rest like a man, and my deed done as a man, and not like a beast running through the forest.

With much aloha, me, your humble servant,

Jack Kaleiwahea.

¹The famous one written of in “Ka Moolelo Oiaio o Kaluaikoolau” or “The True Story of Kaluaikoolau,” which is available from the Kauai Historical Society, or a bookstore near you!

[I wish the digital images of this paper were better. This article is even cut off on the left, so I had to guess at many of the words… It is definitely time to rescan the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers!]

(Lei Momi, 8/5/1893, p. 5)

KALEIWAHEA.

Ka Lei Momi Oili Pule, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 5. Augate 5, 1893.

More on Robert Waialeale, 1887.

With joy, we announce that the Sheriff has kindly promoted Mr. Robert Waialeale, third Secretary of his office, to Sergeant [alii kakiana makai] of the second watch of the Police Department in place of Mr. B. Starr Kapu who left the department yesterday. Appreciation goes to the Sheriff for this recognition.

(Makaainana, 12/17/1887, p. 1)

Me ka hauoli makou e hoike aku nei...

Ka Makaainana, Buke I, Helu 41, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 17, 1887.