Amazing story about the capes given by Kalaniopuu to Cook, 1908.

The Ahuula Garments of Kalaniopuu!

Given by the Chief to Captain Cook!

It is understood in Hawaii’s ancient history, before Captain Cook [Kapena Kuke] left Hawaii, on the 3rd of February, 1779, King Kalaniopuu gave a gift to Captain Cook some Ahuula and Ahu Mamo and feather mahiole headgear of Hawaii. After the ships of Captain Cook left Hawaii Island and before the death of that British Captain, the ships went and landed at Kamchatka, on the eastern shores of Siberia.
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Jules Verne’s famous story to be told, 1875.

A NEW TALE

—ABOUT THE—

STRANGE THINGS OF THE SEA.

On the 2nd of the coming October, we will begin to publish a brand new story written by the famous French Novelist, Jules Verne, called—”Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” which tells of the strange scenes of peoples of the sea and shipwrecks, and so forth. Continue reading

Emma Nakuina educates teachers on Hawaiian history, 1920.

HAWAIIAN STORIES PRESENTED BEFORE THE TEACHERS’ SCHOOL.

In the syllabus of the School of Education this year, beginning on this past Wednesday, were old moolelo of Hawaii nei. And it is Mrs. Emma M. Nakuina who is teaching them before those who come to the teachers’ school during the time set aside for her course.

These below are the moolelo that she will be teaching:

1. Our ties with the Maori of New Zealand.

2. The religion or superstition of the Hawaiians, and along with those beliefs are things relating to Pele and her younger sisters and Hiiaka, along with her brothers.

3. Short stories which show amazing beliefs, like the story of “Kaauhelemoa,” the chicken god of the crater of Palolo and the story of “Akaka Waterfall,” which is close to the head of the Kolekole River in Hilo Paliku.

4. The story of “The Kapa-Beating Woman” of Honohina, the mother of the chiefly child. That child grew up to become one of the strong and skilled warriors of his time. The story of “Elena [Eleau?] and Eleao.”

5. The moolelo of “Lonoikamakahiki” and his association with Capt. Cook.

6. The moolelo of “Umi-a-Liloa,” one of the famous alii of old Hawaii nei.

7. The birth, the important things, and accomplishments of Kamehameha I.

8. The usual activities recalled by Hawaiians in the time of Kamehameha I as well as during my childhood.

9. The major entertainments of Hawaiians.

(Kuokoa, 7/9/1920, p. 4)

HE MAU MOOLELO HAWAII IMUA O KE KULA KUMU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 4. Iulai 9, 1920.

Maika, the half Indian, half Hawaiian, 1892–1893.

THE REMARKABLE ENTERTAINMENT

—ABOUT—

MAIKA

THE BOY THAT WAS

Half Indian and

Half Hawaiian.

THE FIRST MAN TO SHOOT THE BEAR GOD GREATLY FEARED BY THE INDIANS—AS WELL AS THE TERROR OF THE WHITE SKINS–AND THE MASSACRE OF THE THEATRICAL GROUP OF LEE.

When the first brown skins were first contracted on Whaling ships, a man named Akamai boarded and their ship left for the Arctic [Atika] where that kind of huge fish lives to this day, that being the Whale [Kohola].

When their ship was let go in fair winds, and in the middle of the night, while everyone was enjoying their sleep, there was one of them awake then, that being the man who was bent over the oar of that ark of theirs.

While he was crouched over the oar of their ark, that little ship of theirs came upon a storm, and all the gear was blown away by the wind and the masts were snapped and the oars were broken; and because of this storm they ran into, they couldn’t do a thing; all they could do was to sit calmly looking out for land or a ship to save their lives.

While they waited for their end, and when the rays of the sun burst forth, their souls were gladdened to see that they had landed on land; they jumped off to land, and wandered about here and there, and as they wandered around…

[And so begins the amazing story of the hapa Ilikini, hapa Hawaii, named Maika. It runs in the newspaper Leo o ka Lahui (a daily, Mondays to Fridays) from 11/21/1892, and the last installment is found on 6/12/1893.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 11/21/1892, p. 1)

HE NANEA KAMAHAO NO MAIKA

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 586, Aoao 1. Novemaba 21, 1892.

Hawaiian Historical Society collection, 1892.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

The number of books and documents accumulated in the library of the Hawaiian Historical Society [Ahahui Hoopaa Moolelo Hawaii] is 2,247. Mr. Hoes, the person whose duty it is to organize and care for the books, is most careful.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 12/7/1892, p. 3)

He 2,247...

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 598, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 7, 1892.

Hawaiian Historical Society seeking donations, 1892.

O YOU WHO HAVE NEWSPAPERS.

The HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY [AHAHUI MOOLELO HAWAII] is looking for all the newspapers that were published in the Hawaiian language. Should a reader be in the possession of old newspapers, please donate them or sell them to us perhaps. Send correspondence regarding to this announcement to the secretary of the society. REV. C. M. HYDE. Post Office Box 67, Honolulu.

(Kuokoa, 4/9/1862, p. 3)

E NA MEA NUPEPA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXI, Helu 15, Aoao 3. Aperila 9, 1862.

Hawaiian Historical Society established, 1892.

THE HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

On the evening of Dec. 28th, a few of our citizens met and engaged in an informal interchange of ideas in regard to the importance of forming an Historical Society. Prof. Alexander was chosen temporary chairman, and the Rev. Dr. Hyde secretary. It was then decided that the proper time had come for the organization of such a society, and a committee composed of Prof. Alexander, Rev. Dr. Hyde and Mr. J. S. Emerson was chosen to draft a constitution. An adjourned meeting was held last Monday evening at the Honolulu Library, at which this committee made its report. A large number of our most prominent citizens attended, and much interest was shown in the formal organization of the new society. After the adoption of the constitution the following officers were unanimously elected: President, Hon. C. R. Bishop; Vice-President, Mr. J. S. Emerson; Corresponding Secretary, Hon. W. D. Alexander; Recording Secretary, Rev. Dr. C. M. Hyde: Treasurer, Mr. T. G. Thrum. The constitution states that the object of the society is “the collection, study, and utilization of all materials illustrating the Ethnology, Achæology and History of the Hawaiian Islands.” Active members are to pay an initiation fee of five dollars and an annual fee of one dollar. It is hoped that arrangements will be made by which the society will secure as its permanent quarters, for the accommodation of its prospective library and a place of meeting, the large front room of the Honolulu Library. Immediate efforts are to be made for the formation of a library which shall include all books relating in any way to this Kingdom, and all books, pamphlets and newspapers ever printed on the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading