Anna Berry, daughter of Kentucky congressman, speaks on annexation, 1898.

THE INJUSTICE OF ANNEXATION

As Viewed by an American Woman Miss Anna E Berry of Newport—The Kentucky Congressman’s Daughter Writes Entertainingly of the Native Hawaiians—A Petition to the President.

[Among the ladies who accompanied the congressional party to Hawaii in September was Miss Anna Berry, daughter of Congressman Berry of Kentucky, who has written charmingly of the islands. She brought back many souvenirs of her visit, which are to be seen in her Newport home. The best of all is the Royal Hawaiian standard, the flag which was floating over Queen Liliuokalani when she was deposed. It is to be noted that Miss Berry returned to America with a woman’s sense of the injustice of annexation, from the viewpoint of the native Hawaiian, while the men of the party came back a unit for annexation. The Hawaiian minister to whom Miss Berry refers as a descendant of a Kentucky Governor is Rev. Desha, of Hilo. His grandfather was Governor Desha, of Kentucky, and his father was Isaac B. Desha, who committed a sensational murder at Doggett’s Tavern, a well-known inn of early Kentucky days on the Licking River. The murderer was sentenced to death, and saved by his own father’s pardoning power. The case was one of the most remarkable in American criminal history. He fled to Hawaii where one of his half-native sons is a leading Kanaka minister, and the other is a postal employee.—The Editor of the Kentucky Post.

The recent visit of Senator Morgan and four members of the United States House of Representatives to the Hawaiian Islands aroused among the various peoples of the “Paradise of the Pacific” sentiments and feelings as opposite as the poles. There are indeed various peoples in Hawaii—a very scrapbag of a population—the good with the bad. Here Portuguese and Chinese, Japanese and Germans, Americans and natives jostle one another. Continue reading

More on the 11th of June in Kalaupapa, 1904.

11th of June

Sports at Kalaupapa

High holiday [Kamehameha Day] was kept by the inhabitants of the Leper Settlement throughout the 11th of June. As a matter of fact the jollification began on the eve of Kamehameha Day, with a concert by the “H. H. K.’s” [Hui Hooikaika Kino] or the Kalaupapa Athletic Club, in Beretania hall. The program consisted of athletic exercises, singing, etc.

At 7 a. m., on the 11th the boys of Baldwin Home, Kalawao, headed by their band, set out for Kalaupapa to attend the day’s sports and games. The first event was a shooting match for a dinner, between teams captained by Dr. Goodhue and Superintendent McVeigh. It began at 8 o’clock. The Kalawao band played at short intervals during the match. McVeigh’s team won, so that the doctor’s side had to provide the dinner. Following is the score, ten rounds each:

PROGRAM 11TH OF JUNE SPORTS AT KALAUPAPA.

Shooting match for a dinner furnished by the losing team. The match commenced at 8 a. m. Following are the scores:

FIRST TEAM.

J. D. McVeigh ….. 43
J. K. Waiamau ….. 38
Kea Kaehanui ….. 38
M. Klammer ….. 38
J. K. Alapai ….. 36
J. S. Wilmington ….. 32
W. Bruns ….. 31
E. Van Lil ….. 31
Chas. Roth ….. 31
John Forbes ….. 31
Kalani Kaena ….. 30
Wm. Paoo ….. 20
Alex. Smith ….. 19
Punilio ….. 17
Total ….. 435

SECOND TEAM.

W. J. Goodhue …. 37
Achong Holuk ….. 36
Jas. Amaka ….. 36
Haumea ….. 34
Kaaihue ….. 34
Geo. Kanikau ….. 34
Geo. Kaaepa ….. 32
Silas Carter ….. 31
J. H. Imihia ….. 31
N. Kealoha ….. 29
I. Hoolapa ….. 29
Chas. Manua ….. 24
D. N. Nawelu ….. 17
Kaha ….. 15
Total ….. 119

The horse races began at 12 o’clock on the quarter mile track. There was a great turnout of the people and enthusiasm ran high. Drays had been sent around the Settlement to fetch all who were unable to walk. The judges were: Jas. Harvest, chairman; George Kanikau, Achong Ho Luk, Jno. K. Waiamau and John T. Unea (teacher). Following is the program of the races with the winners noted:

HORSE RACES.

1. Match Race—½ mile. Purse, $10.00. Entries: Maluikeao, by Jno. Naluai; Spanish, by S. Carter. Won by Spanish.
2. Bicycle Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $3.00. Entries: Jno. Fernandez, Kawehi, A. Galaspo. Won by A. Galespo.
3. Horse Race—½ mile. Free to all; for horses not entered in any race before. Purse, $7.00. Entries: Keahi o Wailuku, by Jno. Naluai; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter. Won by Kalaupapa Girl.
4. Relay Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $4.00. No entries.
5. Pony Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $8.00. Entries: Baltimore, by R. Kekipi; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing. Won by Kaukaiwa.
6. Wheelbarrow Race—¼ mile. Purse, $4.00. Entries: D. Ku, J. Kauhane, Kakae, Sol. Momoa. Won by Sol. Momoa.
7. Women’s Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $5.00. Entries: Lively, by Kaupali; Billy Huihui, by Punohu. Won by Billy Huihui.
8. Barrel Race—¼ mile. Purse, $1.50. Entries: J. Kauhane, Sol. Momoa, Kakae, Hamauku, Kawehi. Won by Sol. Momoa.
9. Horse Race—¼ mile. Free to all. Purse, $5.00. Entries: Maluikeao, by Jno. Naluai; Kaukeano, by S. Carter. Winner undecided. Dead heat.
10. Foot Race—¼ mile. Purse, $2.00. Entries: J. Kauhane, Kawehi, Hulihee, Sol. Momoa. Won by J. Kauhane.
11. Pony Race—¼ mile. Free to all. Purse, $4.00. Entries: Bob, by J. Moloni; Keahi o Wailuku, by Jno. Naluai; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter. Won by Kaukaiwa.
12. Saddle Relay Race—½ mile. Purse, $4.00. Entries: 1st team—Kamaka, Levi, Holokahiki, Kaena; 2nd team—Nawelu, Kahaulelio, S. Kaai, Moloni. Won by first team.
13. Scrub Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $3.00. Entries: Midnight, by J. Moloni; Bay View, by J. Kapuni; Mikimiki, by S. Carter. Won by Bay View.
14. Foot Race—½ mile. For boys under 13 years of age. Purse, $2.00. Entries: J. Hanakahi, Kelii, J. Francisco. Won by J. Hanakahi.
15. Winners’ Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $12.00. Entries: Spanish, by S. Carter; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing. Won by Spanish.

THE DINNER.

“It was a dandy dinner,” Superintendent McVeigh said yesterday, referring to the evening feast on the shooting match. All the concomitants of a first-class luau were provided, including a bounteous supply of roast pig, together with soda water and cake in abundance. About 120 of the people partook of the repast. The festivities lasted until 12 o’clock Saturday night. In the course of the luau a hearty vote of thanks was passed to the Honolulu contributors of funds for the day’s celebration, with special mention of Acting Governor Atkinson’s agency in soliciting contributions.

“There was never a better behaved crowd,” Mr. McVeigh said with reference to the sports. “At the shooting match nobody was allowed to speak while one was taking aim. They whooped it up, good and strong, after the match and at the horse races.”

PATRIOTIC DISPLAY.

A goodly display of flags was made during the day. The Stars and Stripes was flying on the schoolhouse, the storehouse, the Settlement office, the superintendent’s house and the doctor’s house.

A good day’s sport is expected at the Settlement on the Fourth of July, to consist of athletic exercises and games in the daytime and fireworks in the evening. The good-hearted Honolulu folks will no doubt make timely contributions of money and articles of values for prizes.

[This article followed the illustration by John K. Waiamau posted earlier today.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/17/1904, p. 5)

11th of June

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXIX, Number 49, Page 5. June 17,

More on John K. Waiamau and others, 1893.

PERSONAL.

President Dole’s illness has been caused by an ulcerated tooth. He is now on the mend.

John K. Waiamau, the accomplished young architect is going to Chicago at the expense of his employer, C. B. Ripley to study architectural drawing.

Ornithologist Palmer returned on the Pele last evening from Makaweli, where he has been collecting birds for the British Museum.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/18/1893, p. 2)

PERSONAL.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 122, Page 2. August 18, 1893.

Primo across the sea, 1912.

Making PRIMO PALE

A Hawaii Industry

Honolulu has the best beer in the world—because Honolulu has the best facilities for producing the best beer in the world. Primo Pale is the product of the

HONOLULU BREWING AND
MALTING COMPANY

Island consumers demand good beer, and no other brewing company found in the celebrated breweries of Milwaukee, together with Charles G. Bartlett, for many years manager of the Honolulu Brewing and Malting Company, belongs the credit of giving the island of Hawaii this most modern brewery and the highest quality of beer produced there. To prove this statement—

When in Honolulu Aks for… PRIMO PALE

[The issue of the SF Call that this advertisement appears in is the Hawaiian Publicity Edition, sixteen pages of articles and pictures dealing with Hawaii nei.]

(San Francisco Call, 8/14/1912, p. 6)

Making PRIMO PALE

The San Francisco Call, Volume CXII, Number 75, Page 6. August 14, 1912.

Sanford B. Dole, the Congregationalists, and Annexation, 1902.

THE HAWAIIAN SITUATION.

On Monday evening, April 28 last, Governor Dole was the guest of the Congregational Club of Boston. Elsewhere in this issue will be found a sketch made by Dole of the Hawaiian situation. It is characteristic of the man. Having the full support of the Administration behind him he is not afraid to say in public what he has been thinking in private for many long years. Let us see and take up his points one by one.

Point No. 1.—”The monarchy was overthrown and annexation was accomplished for the sake of good government for the islands; that is, for their benefit.”—It is true! Annexation was accomplished, by a handful of Congregationalists because the reciprocity treaty between the United States and Hawaii was in imminent danger of being abrogated. The monarchy was overthrown, so as to save the $40 per ton duty on sugar. It was then as it is now for the Congregationalists:—Money before principle.

Point No. 2:—”We have given you everything we have by being annexed.”—That is, Sanford B. Dole, and his Congregationalist friends have given to the United States that which did not belong to them. With the help of an American cruiser, American marines and an American Minister, they have robbed the native Hawaiians of their country so as to enable a few Congregationalist planters to keep up receiving big dividends from their sugar stocks which would have been materially cut down had a $40 duty been imposed upon each ton of sugar. The Springfield Republican adds the following comment to Point No. 2: “But the second point that they have given us all they have is not at all consistent with his first point that they sought Annexation for the benefit of the Islands, and it shows that they are still trying to work the United States for the benefit of the Hawaiians.” Continue reading

Republican candidates for Maui, 1904.

REPUBLICAN TICKET ON MAUI ISLE

HON. PHILIP PALI OF LAHAINA.

MOSES K. NAKUINA OF MOLOKAI.

W. J. COELHO OF WAILUKU.

GEORGE COPP.

A. N. HAYSELDEN, NOMINEE FOR SENATOR.

HON. W. P. HAIA OF HANA.

JOHN KALINO OF HAMAKUAPOKO.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 9/23/1904, p. 5)

REPUBLICAN TICKET ON MAUI ISLE

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXIX, Number 77, Page 5. September 23, 1904.