Goat hunting on Kahoolawe, 1911.

Goat Hunters to go to Kahoolawe.

Aboard the Maunaloa of this Friday, Governor Frear, Attorney General Lindsey [Lindsay], and Land Commissioner Alapaki opio [Charles Sheldon Judd] left for the island of Hawaii to look at the homestead lands there. On this trip, the Governor took along an automobile for them to travel mauka side of Hawaii. They get off at Kailua and get on the car to go to Kau, and from there to the volcano until Hilo and from there to Kohala until Waimea, and in two weeks the Maunakea will be there in Kawaihae and they will return to Honolulu nei. On this tour of the Governor and his companions, they will meet with the…

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, p. 1)

NA POE KI KAO NO KAHOOLAWE.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

makaainana who want homestead lands, to ask them first-hand what lands the public desires.

Attorney General Lindsey and Alapaki will make the return trip to Honolulu while Governor Frear will get off at Lahaina, and there meet up with Eben Low, Kuhio, and Kiwini [S. L. Desha], as well as with some other people, to go to Kahoolawe to judge the damages done by the goats, and if they are found at fault, shooting will be their punishment.

The long-distance steamship, the Kaena, will go to Lahaina on the 21st of this month, and by the Kaena the selected jury will go to Kahoolawe.

[See this related story, “Brother Low Recalls 1895–1920″ on Hamakua Times’ website!]

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, pp. 4)

KA POE KI KAO

Kuokoa Homer Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

Famed cowboy Ikuwa Purdy dies, 1945.

Ikuwa Purdy Passes

At 12:15 a. m. on July 4, the incompassionate hands of death reached out and plucked the life breath from the body of Ikuwa Purdy, as per the news received by Eben Low [Epena Low] of Honolulu. Ikuwa Purdy was 72 years old. His funeral will be held on Maui.

Ikuwa Purdy was the head cowboy at the ranch at Ulupalakua, Maui. He became the famous champion of the world in the year 1908 in roping and tying steer at Cheyenne, Wyoming [Waiomina], for speed. He roped and tied two steer at a record speed not achieved by anyone else. That record still stands and has not been broken.

Ikuwa was born in Mana, Waimea, Hawaii, and lived and worked at Parker Ranch [hui hanai holoholona o Paka] in his youth, and then with the Umikoa Ranch, Hamakua, and then he moved to Maui.

One of his proficient pupils at roping and tying cattle is William Kaniho of Waimea.

He left his wife, 9 children, and 3 grandchildren, behind grieving for him.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 7/18/1945, p. 2)

Ua Hala O Ikuwa Purdy

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XL, Number 12, Page 2. Iulai 18, 1945.

Marriage announcement outside of the Vital Statistics Column, 1912.

BOUND WITH THE THREE-STRAND CORD OF TRUE LOVE

Within the Anglican Church of St. Andrew’s, on this past Saturday evening, the youths, Miss Annabel Low and Albert Ruddle were joined together by the Rev. Leopold Kroll. The bride was donned with a white dress and a sheer veil, and atop her head was a lei of orange blossoms. She held a bouquet of flowers in her hand as seen in all marriage ceremonies, and she held a book of prayers in her hand. It was her father, Eben Low, who gave her into the care of her new parent, her husband. Misses Glorinda and Laura Low were the bride’s maids, and they held in their hands, bouquets of lavender roses. The best man was Mr. Kinegal, and the gentlemen in charge of hospitality were Stillman and Percy Deverill.

Miss Annabel Low who married Ruddle is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Low of this town. She was a student who graduated from the College of Kapunahou [Punahou] three years ago, and after some time in the teachers’ school, she was appointed as a teacher at a school on Hawaii Island, where she first met this man whom she wed, Mr. Ruddle, who is employed in a high position at the volcano. They will be returning to the Kanilehua of Hilo on Wednesday’s Mauna Kea where they will make their permanent home from here forth.

(Kuokoa, 7/12/1912, p. 6)

AWAIAULUIA ME KE KAULA KAAKOLU A KE ALOHA OIAIO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 6. Iulai 12, 1912.