Hawaii at the Great London Exposition, 1862.

The Sandwich Islands.—During the last few days a stall has been fitted up near the department of the Ionian Islands which represents the latest and most distant echo in response to the invitation given to all nations and peoples to exhibit their natural and artificial products under the domes of South Kensington. The Hawaiian, or, as they are better known, the Sandwich Islands, were unrepresented in 1851, owing to the collection made there not reaching England till the Exhibition had finally closed, the voyage by a sailing vessel occupying five or six months. This year a similar fate threatened this remote group in the Pacific, and it seemed likely that the name of Hawaii would only be known in connexion with the International Exhibition of 1862 by a pair of silk banners in the nave, and a foreign commissioner with nothing to do. Continue reading

Episcopal Church in Hawaii, 1861.

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

We are frequently inquired of whether anything definite has been done towards establishing an Episcopal Church at Honolulu. By the following, which we extract from the London Examiner of March 9, our readers will be gratified to learn that the matter is in progress and has been referred to a committee consisting of responsible and intelligent men, who will probably see that it is carried to a successful issue. It will be a source of great pleasure not only to us but to all interested in the progress of religion in the Pacific, to announce that the establishment of an Episcopal Church here, has been fully decided upon: Continue reading

The royal mausoleum converted into a chapel, 1922.


On this past Sunday, that being the birthday of the Royal Representative Kuhio, the mausoleum that holds the bones of the alii of Hawaii nei in the cemetery of Nuuanu was made into a chapel for all the Hawaiian societies of Honolulu who wish to hold services there.

This house of the Chiefs was consecrated by the Bishop L. A. Motte [John D. LaMothe] of the Anglican Church [hoomana Pelekane] and assisted by Rev. S. L. Desha, Sr. of Hilo, as was planned earlier.

There were many people who came to see the consecration, and the ceremony was done with much reverence. This will likely make this house of the Alii a unforgettable [?] monument to all the alii of Hawaii.

[Much of the Hilo newspaper, Hoku o Hawaii, is digitized badly, and can hardly be read. This particular article is one of the better ones. I hope all of the illegible articles are not important ones!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/30/1922, p. 3)


Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XV, Helu 44, Aoao 3. Maraki 30, 1922.