More on the Hawaiian flag and the Republic, 1894.


When the Iwalani docked, we received a letter with the news from Kauai, “the land where the sun is snatched” [ka moku kaili la], and this is the news. On this past Fourth of July, the holiday of the true Americans to celebrate the glory of the Independence of that Great Republic of the world.

W. H. Rice put up two flags on his flagpole, the American Flag on top, and the Hawaiian Flag below; and so too did G. N. Wilcox. But the amazing thing is that on the grounds of the “Peacock Government” [Aupuni Pikake] is established, such action was not seen; this kind of thing is just so hilarious.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 7/11/1894, p. 2)


Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 980, Aoao 2. Iulai 11, 1894.

Castle and Cooke flies the Hawaiian Flag, 1894.


It is an astonishing thing to see the Hawaiian Flag at the shop of Castle and Co. [Kakela ma], up on the flagpole, where the American flag was placed for 18 or more months. And these days, the Flag is seen waving from the flagpole; how fickle is this; what is with this action by Castle and Co.

It perhaps will be said that this is the flag of the Republic, but we say that such is not the truth, it is simply running away and hiding, just like what the Supreme Court Justice stated, that the “Peacock Government” [Aupuni Pikake] governs under the Hawaiian Flag; they are frightened of the Lion [England] these days.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 7/11/1894, p. 2)


Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 980, Aoao 2. Iulai 11, 1894.

Anna Berry, daughter of Kentucky congressman, speaks on annexation, 1898.


As Viewed by an American Woman Miss Anna E Berry of Newport—The Kentucky Congressman’s Daughter Writes Entertainingly of the Native Hawaiians—A Petition to the President.

[Among the ladies who accompanied the congressional party to Hawaii in September was Miss Anna Berry, daughter of Congressman Berry of Kentucky, who has written charmingly of the islands. She brought back many souvenirs of her visit, which are to be seen in her Newport home. The best of all is the Royal Hawaiian standard, the flag which was floating over Queen Liliuokalani when she was deposed. It is to be noted that Miss Berry returned to America with a woman’s sense of the injustice of annexation, from the viewpoint of the native Hawaiian, while the men of the party came back a unit for annexation. The Hawaiian minister to whom Miss Berry refers as a descendant of a Kentucky Governor is Rev. Desha, of Hilo. His grandfather was Governor Desha, of Kentucky, and his father was Isaac B. Desha, who committed a sensational murder at Doggett’s Tavern, a well-known inn of early Kentucky days on the Licking River. The murderer was sentenced to death, and saved by his own father’s pardoning power. The case was one of the most remarkable in American criminal history. He fled to Hawaii where one of his half-native sons is a leading Kanaka minister, and the other is a postal employee.—The Editor of the Kentucky Post.

The recent visit of Senator Morgan and four members of the United States House of Representatives to the Hawaiian Islands aroused among the various peoples of the “Paradise of the Pacific” sentiments and feelings as opposite as the poles. There are indeed various peoples in Hawaii—a very scrapbag of a population—the good with the bad. Here Portuguese and Chinese, Japanese and Germans, Americans and natives jostle one another. Continue reading

Restoration Celebration at Luakaha, in Nuuanu, 1843.


Here is the food that M. Kekuanaoaʻs overseers [konohiki] contributed for the feast of the King upland of Nuuanu at Luakaha on the 3rd of August.

Mahuka, 2 pigs, 3 chickens, 53 coconuts. Maalaiki, 1 chicken. Hanakauluna, 2 chicken. Kanana, 1 chicken. Nui, 1 pig, 1 basket of sweet potato. Kumupala, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 5 sweet potato, 5 taro. Kauwai, 1 chicken. Nalapauwahiole, 2 chicken, 6 taro. Kaluahinenui, 1 lau [400] fish, 36 coconuts. Mu, 1 pig. Kanoa, 37 coconuts. Makahopu, 1 chicken. Nailimai, 1 chicken. Nahalelauhala, 2 chicken. Puuloa, 1 chicken. Kalalawalu, 1 pig. Kaohe, 1 chicken. Kaleimakalii, 1 chicken. Kepu, 2 chicken. Kinopu, 1 pig. Hueu, 2 chicken. Napohaku, 1 chicken. Kaaua, 2 pigs, 1 chicken, 1 turkey, 2 ducks, 120 fish. Koiamai, 1 chicken. Nalino, 2 chicken. Kamaukoli, 1 pig, 4 poi, 120 fish. Paele, 1 chicken, 5 baskets of sweet potato [kiki uala], 10 taro. Kahakuailii, 1 chicken. Kaaipuna, 1 chicken, 1 duck. Polikua, 2 pigs. Kikaha, 1 pig. Kekoaalohiu, 1 pig. Kaiwi, 1 chicken. Kaniho, 1 pig, 2 poi. Kawahinelawaia, 1 chicken. Kahanamoku, 1 pig. Kapoo, 1 chicken. Kaluhia, 3 chicken. Makahuluhulu, 1 chicken. Keliikumoku, 1 poi. Kokahi, 1 pig. Honaunau, 1 pig, 55 taro.

Here is the food that Kamehameha’s very own konohiki contributed for his feast.

Wiliama, T. 1 pig, 2 poi, 8 fish, 1 chicken. G. P. Judd, 2 pig, 7 poi, 8 fish. Kanoa, 1 pig. Huakini, 1 pig. Wahahee, 1 pig, 6 taro. Kekai, 1 poi, 50 fish. Kanaina, 1 pig. Kalama, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 6 taro, 1 poi, 1 basket of sweet potato. Namakeha, 1 chicken, 1 poi. Keohokalole, 2 pig, 27 coconuts. Kalaimoku, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaaoao, 1 poi. Kalunaaina, 1 pig, 1 poi. Kamakahonu, 30 fish. Namauu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Piikoi, 2 poi, 1 duck, 1 pig, 10 fish. Papa, 4 sweet potato. Kealakai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Nakoa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaeo, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kailiwai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kelama, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kanewili, 1 poi. Kapu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Koa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kahoe, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Lahilahi, 1 pig, 1 poi. Haole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Ulunui, 4 fish. Ulualoha, 1 pig. Kale, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Hinau, 1 poi. Makole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kuaana, 2 poi, 20 fish. He 60 fish. Kuke, 1 pig, 1 poi. Punahele, 1 poi, 10 fish. Alapai, 1 pig. Kala, 1 poi, 1 pig. Kahaaualii, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kamokuholohewa, 1 poi. Kekuaiwahia, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Puhalahua, 1 pig, 1 chicken. Ioane Ii, 2 pig, 1 chicken, 2 turkey. Kanina, 1 pig. Kaawahua, 1 poi, grapes. Maalahia, 1 poi, grapes. Kaapuiki, 1 chicken. Kaihiwa, 1 pig. Keaniani, 1 pig. Kaaha, 1 pig. Kaunuohua, 300 lemons.

Those were the konohiki who contributed to the king’s celebratory feast, and there were many konohiki of the King and M. Kekuanaoa who did not contribute to this celebratory feast of the king for the return of the land to him. And these konohiki who did not contribute, are without aloha, and without joy for the return of the nation to our king.

At perhaps 11 o’clock was when the King went up with his men in their …

(Nonanona, 8/5/1843, p. 28)


Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 28. Augate 8, 1843.

glory; and the haole of the warships, in their best; and the musicians. And when they reached the uplands and entered into the grass house [hale pili], that was when the celebration began with music.

When the food was ready on the table spread over with greenery, it was 32 feet long and 2 feet wide. And the amount of food placed on this table was: 60 pigs, 300 chicken, 40 turkeys, 58 ducks. With all the supplies necessary to prepare this food; Kamamalu 1 set of supplies [? ukana], Lota 1 ukana; Liholiho 1 ukana; Mose 1 ukana; Lunalilo 1 ukana.

The number of servants was over forty per ukana. There were 250 plates, 250 knives, 250 forks, 250 bowls, 250 cups, 150 spoons. And the number of those who ate were probably over 250; there were two prominent haole: Commodore Kearny from the American man-of-war, and the head of the United States warships in East India. Ana Admiral R. Thomas of the British warship, the head of the British warships in the Pacific.

There were four flags raised above the troops while the feast went on: one British flag, one American flag, one French flag, and one Hawaiian flag; and the king’s standard stood near to where the king was.

When the  feast was over, most on foot went back; all together the men, women, and children totaled 2000 or perhaps more. The number of horses were 270, and the riding on the horses on the return was by fours, with two flags and the musicians, while from their mouths came hip hip hurrah [hipi hipi hulo] with great joy all the way until Haliimaile. Written by I. H. Paehewa, Secretary

The Fort. August 5, 1843.

[Anyone know how “ukana” is being used here? Calabash?]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

"...kou hanohano..."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 5, 1843.

La Hoihoi Ea, 1843.


This day, July thirty first, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, will hereafter be referred to, as memorable in the history of the Sandwich Islands Government. The existence of the Government has often been threatened, but it has been most signally preserved. It is easy to trace the superintending Providence of God in every stage of its advancement. Many months since persons acquainted with its condition were fully aware that a most important crisis was approaching. It was seen that if the nation continued independent favorable influences must be exerted on the other side of the world. While the most amicable negotiations were going forward, an English Man of War anchors in this harbor. Immediate hostile action was threatened unless the Government yielded to certain demands. Those having been acceded to, others more exhorbitant were forth coming. The King finding himself involved in difficulties, which were not of his own making, under a reservation most reluctantly made a Provisional Cession of his dominions to the Queen of England.

He signed the treaty of cession while bathed in tears. At 3 oʻclock, P. M. Feb. 25, 1843, the National Flag was taken down, while that of England was raised. Never shall we forget the day. To the native population and a majority of the Foreign Residents of all nations, it was a day of sadness. They knew not as their eyes would ever again behold the Flag of Kamehameha III., waving over his rightful dominions. Whoever shall write an accurate history of the period which has since elpased must draw some dark shades to the picture.

The arrival of H. M. S. Dublin, and the negotiations which have taken place between the Admiral and the King, present affairs in a different aspect, which to most in this community is as unexpected as joyful.

The King is to receive a full restoration of his rights, privileges and and dominions. This morning, a public recognition of this restoration will take place. At 10 oʻclock, A. M., His Majesty Kamehameha III., will appear upon the plain East of the town. His standard will be unfurled under a general salute; which being finished, the National Flag will be displayed on both Forts, and be saluted by H. B. M. Ships with 21 guns each, which will be answered from the Forts. At one oʻclock, public religious services will be held in the Stone Church. At three oʻclock, His Majesty will embark to visit Richard Thomas, Rear Admiral of the White, H. B. M. Ship Dublin.

If reports are true, there will be other salutes and exhibitions of public joy! No doubt many hearty wishes and fervent prayers will be uttered for the prosperity of the King, and the welfare of the Government. To the latest generation may a lineal and worthy successor of His Majesty Kamehameha III., sit upon the throne of his ancestors. All genuine lovers of the Sandwich Islands Government, here and throughout the world, will cherish in grateful recollection the memory of Rear Admiral THOMASʻ timely interferance and noble deeds in behalf of a feeble, but well disposed people, who are struggling amid many hindrances to preserve their National Independence.

[This is from a special edition of the Advocate and Friend published on the very day of the restoration. The rest of the coverage can be seen here on the Mission Houses Museum page! Mahalo to Dwight Baldwin (descendant of the Temperance Advocate, and Seamenʻs Friend editor Samuel C. Damon) via Nathan Napoka for reminding me that there are indeed Hawaii newspapers other than Hawaiian-Language Newspapers.]

(Advocate and Friend, 7/31/1843, p. 38)


Advocate and Friend. (Extra). July 31, 1843, p. 38.

One year since the Republic transferred power to the United States, 1899.


This is the Day that made a year since the day that the Hawaiian Flag was taken down and the American Flag was raised on the flag pole of Iolani Palace.

The hurt down in our guts [naau] is unimaginable when remembering this; for there is no Hawaiian that can say that his naau is happy with what was done. Because if we are not mistaken, branded withing the hearts of Hawaiians is the love and pride for his Beloved Flag. The flag which holds memories of many years spreading its wings in peace over the cheeks of Hawaii nei. And for which none of us can say that we were robbed and saddened under its protection. Not at all! Our hearts will only cherish for all times, the loving memories and peace; and as such, are not each and every Kanaka Hawaii burning with aloha for it?

The falling of the Hawaiian Flag from where it proudly fluttered on the tips of the warm breezes of Hawaii nei, is like the death of origin and foundation of this people [lahuikanaka]; and it is clear that the branches and leaves of this tree (The Hawaiian Nation) will wither and fade, a tree that was greatly admired by other nations for its lush and verdant growth. What was called the “Paradise of the Pacific [Paredaiso o ka Pakipika].”

Therefore, where is it today? It has gone, and died; and it is but the wisps that are budding, without a parent to feed its nourishing waters. For the trunk has been chopped.

Because of this heart-wrenching thing, the Lahui Hawaii invites all of you, native Hawaiians. From this day forward, to discard your living indifferently, lazily, wastefully, off others, and all of your childish ways; and for each and everyone of you to stand and fight against the obstructions in this world with patience, caution, independence, and righteousness; and it is through this that Hawaii nei will once again regain its success and pride. Now is the time, and it is only now that we can do the mending while this striped cloth has not become too ragged. (Inoa Lahui.)

(Lahui Hawaii, 8/12/1899, p. 4)


Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 29, Aoao 4. Augate 12, 1899.

Different view of the seal of the republic, 1896.

Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii.

In today’s P. C. Advertiser (February 25), a picture of the Great Seal of the Republic of Hawaii was printed.

By our understanding of that image, there is no way that those who established this Republic can erase or end or eradicate visages of the Monarchy and its accomplishments, from the seal mentioned above.

They stated and vowed that there will be no way that the reestablishment of the Kingdom of Hawaii nei will be allowed. However, when they set out to create a Seal for their Government. And now, that foolish idea of the plunderers and thugs has gone awry.

Being that, (1.) On that Great Seal, is the foundation of the first Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei. (2.) There is the stripes of the Hawaiian Flag of the Monarchy. (3.) There stand puloulou, a symbol of the Hawaiian Monarchy of old. (4.) There is an image of Kamehameha I., the King who unified the Hawaiian Archipelago into one Nation. (5.) There are the words—”Ua Mau ke Ea o ka Aina i ka Pono” affixed onto this new Seal, the words given by King Kamehameha III after the restoration of the Independence of Hawaii nei by Great Britain.

All these things were from the Great Seal of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei (except Kamehameha I.)

The new things added are these. (1.) Rays of the Sun. (2.) The image of Kamehameha I. (3.) The image of the Goddess of Victory. (4.) The Star. (5.) The Phoenix Bird, and (6.) The words, Republic of Hawaii.

Their intense desire is to rub out, to stomp out, and to end for all time, things of the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, lest vestiges of that sort remain in Hawaii; but that is not possible: there is no erasing, nor putting end to deeds done by the past Monarchs of Hawaii.

We know the story of the Phoenix, but it is not the same as the explanatory speech by P. C. Jones at the Armory [Hale Paikaukoa] in the year 1893, and these are his words:

“Once, Mrs. Kinau Wilder [Waila] went to where Ostrich were raised near Diamond Head [Laeahi]. One of the birds of the French Doctor Trousseau laid an egg, and it was on that occasion given to Kinau, and the egg was called Kinau. However, it was left there to be sat on by a bird until it hatched.

“This is similar to this Republic,” according to Jones. “It was born like that egg, Kinau.”

There is one unfortunate thing about that egg called by the name of Kinau, that being, it was a rotten egg [huaelo]. There was no chick born from that egg.

Jones didn’t know of the outcome of that egg, for it was but a yolk-less egg [hua makani], a hua laalaau?, a worthless egg.

Perhaps this will be the outcome of the Republic to which he compares it to? But at any rate, that is the kind of Ostrich egg that Kinau chose.

The shell of that astonishing egg is kept at the residence of Trousseau [Kauka Farani] in Makiki.

This astonishing Ostrich is not the same as a Phoenix which rises from the ashes.

(Aloha Aina, 2/29/1896, p. 4)

Ke Sila Nui o ka Repubalika o Hawaii Nei.

Ke Aloha Hawaii, Buke II, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Feberuari 29, 1896.