More on the commemorative tablets, but from the pen of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani himself, 1907.


Memorial Tablets to the Alii of the Land are Unveiled.

This past Sunday the Kawaiahao Church was filled to listen to the commemorative program for John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea, and Ululani; the people whose names are inscribed on the marble tablets placed in the church.

On the wall mauka at the pulpit of the pastor is where the marble tablet of John Ii is placed, and mauka of the central door to enter into the chapel [keena pule] is where the tablet of the last three names.

The Kaahumanu Society came in great numbers on this day, and one side of the church was filled with them, and there were many visitors who came to witness the events held on that day.

It was Rev. H. H. Parker who introduced the two that gave the speeches about the history of those who were being memorialized on that day, they being Rev. S. L. Desha and the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani.

Rev. S. L. Desha’s speech relied heavily upon his introductory words that morning about the woman who anointed the feet of Jesus, and just as the words of the Lord speaks of the actions of that woman becoming something remembered, in that same way Desha presented things about John Ii.

He spoke of the story of this man from his childhood, and he was one of the intelligent ones who gave great assistance in guiding the nation forward.

When the missionary teachers urged the King to educate him, he chose John Ii to be educated along with the younger brother of the King; this showed the King had much trust in this man.

In the administration of the nation, John Ii was the first amongst the Hawaiians who the King chose for an important post. When a commissioner was being chosen to give lands to the people, he was one who was selected, and he rose to the position of judge on the Supreme Court.

When the King received instruction from San Francisco to send someone from Hawaii to sit in the jury of that city pertaining to the crime committed by a Hawaiian [Harry Kaheleiki], it was indeed John Ii who the king chose to send to hear this case, and this man’s abilities and intelligence was seen through his actions.

In his attitude towards religion, he was a man who always stuck to what was right, and he gave sermons at the Church of Ewa. It is said that if it was heard that he was the one to be speaking, the church would be filled, and people stood outside, and on one Sunday when he went to go pray, when he was headed home, he fell from his horse and broke a rib, and that was his ailment which persisted until his death.

It is said in the history of this man, he was a man of strength, and the Alii were of great importance to him. As a result of an accident involving one of the Alii, that being the Alii falling from a horse, he did not wait to find out the cause of this distress to the Alii, but his outrage was focused upon the horse, and in his anger, with but one punch he struck the horse and it died.

After the words about John Ii was done, the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani stood and read the story of the second part of the events of that day, and we are printing what he presented for them, just as he read, and here it is below:

Whereas:—The second portion of the events of this day is the dedication of the commemorative tablet for Ululani and Haalelea which is affixed to the wall in front of this church.

This gift was not on account of just one person, but it is a present from the people. It is the members, intimates, and friends of the Kawaiahao Church showing the family of the ones who died their aloha and their never-ending remembrance of Ululani Haalelea.

The reason and the cause that this endeavor was carried out by the members and it was decided to place it here in this church of Kawaiahao:

Whereas, Ululani did a great deed for this church and its members, over a long period of time, during her lifetime, and she was a brethren of this Church.

With the auspices of the Church, along with this commemorative speech, will be attached the history of her life, her birth, her fine works, and the list of names of the intimates and friends who were involved, and will be gifted to the family of Ululani Haalelea here in Honolulu and in other places.

(See page 8.)

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 1)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 1. Okatoba 18, 1907.


(From page 1.)

Ululani was born in they year 1842, in the month of July on the 21st, at Hilo, Hawaii. Sixteen years later, in the month of June, she was married to the alii, Levi Haalelea.

They lived in the holy covenant of matrimony until 1864, when Haalelea died; therefore, she only lived with her husband for six years, and they had not children.

In that very year, and a just before that time, Henry H. Parker came from his position as teacher at Lahainaluna College.

He was to serve as kahu of Kawaiahao Church, and it was then Ululani Haalelea was included into the church by this Henry H. Parker; she was the first fruit for righteousness in her confession of faith [hoike manaoio], and she became a member of the Kawaiahao Church.

And from then on she remained a member of the Church until her recent death in 1904; she was a member for 40 years, in her 62 years of life.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a chiefess who was steadfast in the righteousness of God. She was humble with aloha. She was pleasant and benevolent, she was a mother for the Christian good in Hawaii, she was a famous chiefess and prominent among the Courts of the Monarchs, and the high chiefs of the land, she was an attendant of Queens, and held honored positions in the courts of those days.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a leader and an adviser of the Beneficent association of this town, from the Beneficent Associations of the haole, to the haole women and to the Hawaiians; she was the vice president of the Ahahui Hoola Lahui of Kalakaua and Kapiolani, she was a distinguished member of the board of trustees of the Maternity Home, and a president of the Choir “Hawaii Noeau.”

In 1893, a difficult situation fell upon the membership of Kawaiahao, that being the Kahu realized the state of the church at that time; it was old and the wood all over the building was rotting.

He fetched carpenters and they came and looked; they said that shortly services could not be held in the near future; it was just a matter of time before it fell.

Therefore, that very year, the doors of the church were shut. And the meetings of the members were held in a coconut front lanai upon this grounds.

Looking on, there was nothing left to do; the members ordered the building be torn down from top to bottom, leaving only the stone walls.

There were two big problems at the time. 1. The poor and needy state of the Church; there was no money to reestablish and rebuild the church. 2. the overthrowing of the Monarchy of Hawaii that year. The thoughts of the Hawaiians and the haole were cleaved in two, the unity was broken, and aloha was broken into bits, and feelings of rage and anger grew. The church members were split in two with one group being patriots while the other group being for annexation.

Because of these problems, there grew many doubts and predictions of disaster. Kawaiahao would not be built anew for the land and the people were in turmoil. But Ululani Haalelea had no doubt, she stood up and holding a plow in her hand, in righteousness, and she set up the very first money-making event to rebuild Kawaiahao Church, among the many words of doom from the haole and Hawaiians alike.

Six months later, in December 1893, a great Fair [Aha Fea] was held in the uplands of Manamana, under the direction of Ululani assisted by Mrs. Annie Dowsett and the mothers of Kawaiahao, and the effort went smoothly.

Subtracting the expenses from the profits, what was left was $2000 in the funds to build the church.

At the same time, the members took action by figuring out on paper their donations. Some put $20, some $10, some $5, some $1.00, and so forth, and in the month of April of 1894, in the coconut frond lanai, the members gave their donations which totaled to $890 in cash, and $400 on paper.

When the wealthy haole amongst us living in Hawaii nei as well as in foreign lands saw that the members of Kawaiahao were taking action at the urging of Ululani Haalelea, they said, [“]We will now give you aid, O Kawaiahao, for we see that you are working and putting in great effort.[“]

Therefore, from Britain, from Theo. Davies, came $1000; from his wife $500; from C. R. Bishop $1000; and some others.

In that same year, the members chose a committee for the building of the church: The Kahu, Chairman; Ululani Haalelea, E. K. Lilikalani, D. L. Naone, Mary Adams, W. R. Castle, and P. C. Jones was the treasurer for the funds to build the church.

In the closing months of 1894, the church was completed, and the members entered after nine months of holding services in the Coconut frond  hut [hale papa’i Launiu]. The church was complete with the total expenses being $14,000. In the famous history of this church, it was King Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III who first set up the building of this church in the year 1839, and it was complete in 1843 and consecrated to Jehovah. Its head was Rev. Hiram Bingham [Rev. Hiram Binamu].

In 1892, the Jubilee of the old Kawaiahao was held. And it was torn down in 1893. Therefore the old Kawaiahao stood for 51 years before it was razed.

And in the reconstruction of the New Kawaiahao, Ululani Haalelea was the one with a steel heart of aloha in the works for the Lord who inspired the brethren, [“]Let’s rebuild the Church.[“] And this is what we see now, that it is better than the previous Kawaiahao. And Rev. H. H. Parker is the Kahu, the leader; therefore I say that Ululani Haalelea is a Chiefess who is ranked in the List of famous chiefesses of the land.

    1. Her Highness Victoria Kamamalu, was the one to establish the first Kaahumanu Society of women here in the town of Honolulu in 1864, just as you all on this day, and she was extremely intelligent and famous for her knowledge in singing and musical instruments.
    2. Queen Ema Kaleleonalani, was the one who established the Queen’s Hospital which is called by her name, a place of refuge for their [Queen Emma and Kamehameha IV] citizens in times of trouble.
    3. Her Highness, Princess Pauahi Bishop, dedicated all of her wealth for the Kamehameha Schools. A blessing for the generations of youth of her lahui.
    4. Queen Kapiolani was the one who established the Kapiolani Maternity Hospital called by her name, the place of rest for Hawaiian women for their periods of difficulty.
    5. And the Chiefess Ululani Haalelea, the second cornerstone, the one who lead her fellow laborers of good, [“]Let’s rebuild the Kawaiahao Church,[“] by establishing the first Fair [Fea], and the proceeds from it was dedicated to the funds for the construction of the church, and this was carried out, and it was built, and the Building was completed in time and paid off with no debt.

And we all are witnesses who see firsthand the famous works of these chiefesses. Those words of the Lord Jesus Christ about that woman who anointed him in oil were fulfilled: Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her.

In that way we are remembering Ululani, with this stone monument for her, for Haalelea, her own husband, and for Haalilio; along with the monument to the Hanai Parent of the chiefs, Ioane Ii, the great Judge of the Supreme Court during the reign of Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III,  a member of the National Boundary Commission, a member of the House of Nobles, and a native born chief. It was for all of them that the speeches of commemoration on this day were given, people who give pride to this land.


[It is interesting to compare this account by E. K. Lilikalani with the account presented earlier in the PCA on 10/14/1907.]

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 8)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 8. Okatoba 18, 1907.

150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.


Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day of August every year in Honolulu nei, at the location designated.

Clause V. The Association will supply Record Books [Buke Oihana] of the Association, as well as any other expenses for the President, Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause VI. The President will select Executive Committees for this Association, and they will prepare lists of names of those who want to present themselves before the Association.

Clause VII. Should a member of this Association die, then the President or if not the President, then a representative will order by Executive Committee to gather in mourning attire at the place of the deceased for the funeral over her body.

Clause VIII. The President of this Association is empowered to establish other Associations on the other islands of this Nation.

Clause IX. The Association shall resolve all problems and difficulties brought before it from other lands.

Clause X. The Treasurer may expend all funds at her disposal with the approval of the President.

Clause XI. Members of this Association shall pay a dollar and a half ($1.50) yearly, or installments of an eighth ($0.12.1-2) every month; it is not prohibited to give more.

Clause XII. Clauses of this Constitution may be changed after one year.

¹Pauahi is often referred to as A. Pauahi. [Would there be anyone who knows what that initial stands for?]

(Kuokoa, 8/20/1864, p. 4)

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 4. Augate 20, 1864.

A mele by Joseph Nawahi for his wife Emma Aima, 1936.


Some day later, we were asked at our Hoku publishing office, of the songs which were sung at the funeral of Mrs. Aima Nawahi on the last Sunday of this past year. The mele sung on that day were famous songs in “Leo Hoonani a me Hoku Ao Nani.”¹ They were not all shown and there were others, like “Mai Kuu Kaumaha Luuluu a Po,” and the young girls of Haili sang those songs with beautiful lyrics.

There were also hymns sung by some girls who were close to Aunty Aima, and they were sung with such sweetness. The mele sung by the Kaahumanu Society was this one. “Ma ko Iesu mau lima,” and some others as well.

The main reason that this question was asked, was because of the great admiration for the hymns composed by the devout in years gone by. There is someone writing down some old mele in a book to be distributed, and these hymns are wanted by this person writing down Hawaiian mele as something new for him. Another admired mele sung at the funeral of Mrs. Nawahi was that mele composed by Mr. Nawahi before their marriage. Here are the lines of that mele that are recalled partially, and recalled at that time.

Nana aku iluna
He star e alohi ana
Ua like me sweet rose
Me Fairy Puakoolau.

Aheahe mai ke kehau of the twilight
Pa mai ke ala onaona oia of my dear
Please wau e kiss i ke ala oia pua
And not Forgetting the sweet Lei Lehua

Hoi iho au e moe
Hiki ana o sweet rose
E naue ae kaua
I kuu home iuiu.

This is a mele that was sung all the time by the women of those days, and the lyrics are beautiful. There are many other lovely mele by Hawaiians that we remember, but when it is thought to sing it, we totally forget the words.

¹Leo Hoonani a me Hoku Ao Nani. Honolulu: Ka Papa Hawaii, 1902.

[This mele is printed earlier in Hoku o Hawaii on 1/3/1936 and the article itself is a reprint from 1/7/1936.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/15/1936, p. 3)


Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXVII, Helu 29, Aoao 3. Ianuari 15, 1936.

Queen Liliuokalani birthday celebration, 1911.

Birthday of Liliu.

On this past Saturday, September 2, it was the birthday of Queen Liliuokalani, and a royal audience was held midday of that day between 11 a. m. and 1 p. m. in the afternoon.

At 8 a. m. in the morning of this Saturday, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] appeared at Washington Place [Wakinekona Home] and played Hawaiian songs which were composed by the alii during the Monarchy of Hawaii nei, and some of these songs were composed by Queen Liliuokalani. The Royal Hawaiian Band played for an hour in the morning to commemorate the birthday of Liliu at Washington Place, and they played once again from 11 midday to 1 in the afternoon.

At 11, the public was allowed to come and see the alii. The Kalama Society, Kaahumanu Society, and Kauikeaouli Society arrived to see the Queen.

The interior of Washington Place was decorated with kahili, just as during the era when the alii ruled—it was beautiful and awe inspiring to see that morning. The Queen sat upon her cotton chair [noho pulu], with two boys behind her chair, holding long kahili, with ahuula upon their shoulders. The Princess Kawananakoa was on the Queen’s right, and Colonel Iaukea was on her left, and he was the one who introduced the Queen to the malihini and to the townspeople. There also, were the heads of the Territory, County, and Federal government. There were many distinguished people of this town who went to see the alii, and by the looks of it, almost one thousand people came during this royal audience.

What shocked this reporter on that morning, was that two-thirds of the people who went to give their congratulations on the birthday of the Queen were malihini and haole. As for the true Hawaiians, only but a few went to see the alii. Reflecting back in time, and seeing Liliu in her finery, i am lulled into recalling the days when Hawaiians were proud upon the soil of their native land.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 9/8/1911, p. 4)

ka La Hanau o Liliu.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke IX, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.

Kuu Aina Hanau E. 1871.

Kuu Aina Hanau e.

1. Kuu aina hanau e,
Nou au e mele nei,
Aina maikai,
O na makua o’u,
Me na keiki pu,
E o, mai o a o,
Kuu mele nei.

2. Kuu aina hanau e,
Kuu aina makamae,
Aloha au
I kou mau kahawai,
Na kualono e,
Na kula uli mau,
He oli ko’u.

3. Hookani na laau,
Na aheahe hau
I kou maikai;
Poha na leo e
Mai na pohaku mai,
Kanaka, kamalii,
Hookani ae.

4. E ka Makua e,
Nou mai ka malu nei,
E haliu mai,
Hoomau i na maikai,
Ka maluhia e,
A nou ko makou ‘Lii
Ka hoomaikai.

Mele Kula Sabati.

My Dear Land of Birth.

1. My dear land of birth,
For thee I sing,
Beautiful land,
Of my parents,
And my children,
Respond from far and wide
To my song.

2. My dear land of birth,
My cherished land,
I love
Your rivers,
The mountain ridges,
The ever-green plains,
I am jubilant.

3. The trees sound forth,
The gentle cool breezes
Of your splendor;
The voices boom
From the rocks,
Men, children,
Sounding forth.

4. O Father,
From whom comes our protection,
Look down upon us,
Let the goodness continue,
The peace,
And for you, our King
Is the praise.

Sunday School Song.

[This is the song sung at the opening of the first meeting of the Kona chapter of the Kaahumanu Society held on  March 30, 1913. It is one of the many compositions of Lorenzo Lyons. The song was sung to the tune of “America,” and it seems some of the sentiment was taken from its lyrics as well.]

(Lau Oliva, 2/1871, p. 1)

Kuu Aina Hanau e.

Ka Lau Oliva, Buke I, Helu 2, Aoao 1. Feberuari, 1871.

Lei o Kaahumanu, 1916.


Lei Kaahumanu i ke aloha,
Lei haaheo i ka lanakila;
Lei i ka mamo hulu melemele,
Lei Hawaii i kou inoa.


E ala e ka I ame ka Mahi,
E ala na kini o ka aina;
Hookahi puuwai me ka lokahi,
E ola ka inoa o Kaahumanu.

Eia ko lei e lei ai,
Na ke aloha i lawe mai nei;
I lei hoohie mau ia nou,
E ola ka inoa o Kaahumanu.


Kaahumanu is adorned with a lei of aloha,
A proud lei in victory;
Adorned with the yellow-feathered mamo,
Hawaii is adorned by your name.


Rise, O I and Mahi,
Rise, O People of the land;
With one heart and in unity,
May the name of Kaahumanu live.

Here is the lei for you to wear,
Carried here by aloha;
It is an ever distinguished lei for you,
May the name of Kaahumanu live.

(Kuokoa, 12/29/1916, p. 2)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 29, 1916.

Kaahumanu Society Chapter V of Kona a century old! 1913 / 2013.


At 3:30 p. m. on Sunday, and through the kindness of Rev. E. S. Timoteo of the Church of Kealakekua, he allowed the coconut frond lanai of his home to hold the meeting to establish the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu] of the calm of Kona.

The members of the various branches of Kohala, Waimea, Hamakua, Laupahoehoe and the society of the famous rain of Hilo Hanakahi; they were members who came for duties of the Evangelical Association [Ahahui Euanelio], Sunday School Association [Ahahui Kula Sabati], and Christian Endeavor Association [Ahahui C. E.].

The meeting was presided over by the head president of the Parent Association of Honolulu, Miss Lucy K. Peabody, and the secretary of that parent association, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb took the minutes of the meeting.

The meeting was begun with the singing of the hymn, “Kuu aina hanau e” and a prayer given by S. L. Desha.  The proclamation was read by Mrs. Lahilahi Webb for the establishment of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five at Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii, and at the completion of the reading of the text of the proclamation from the parent association of Honolulu, the establishing members of the new Association, Chapter Five, was made known.

There were twenty members who signed the membership book, and in that way, the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five was started; and at that time, an election was held to choose the officers of this association whose names are below:

Mrs. Esther Baker, president; Mrs. Kealoha Kamauoha, vice president; Miss Maggie Hooper, treasurer; Miss Sarah Kamauoha, secretary; Mrs. Lydia Kekuewa, vice secretary; Mrs. Kaai, auditor; and Mrs. Emily Haae,  committee of the whole [? komite nui].

After the election of the officers was over, all the members of the many associations stood along with the new members of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five, and the new members were adorned with paper lei, and at that time the members of Chapter Three of Hilo sang the song “Ka Lei o Kaahumanu.”

When that truly lovely song was being sung, the members were filled with awe and tears welled up in some, and the two mothers who established this junior Kaahumanu society felt that this was perhaps one of the most awe-inspiring initiations seen;  and after the song was over, the new association was blessed with a prayer by the brother of the Ahahui Kaahumanu, Rev. S. J. Desha of the Church of Haili, the one who is a great help to the efforts of the mothers of this association.

The money donated for the treasury of this new association was 27.75.

The sisters of the Kaahumanu committees who arrived and participated in the activities were these below:

Mrs. Hattie Hapai, the honorary president of the association of Hilo; Mrs. Alai Akana, president of the Association of Hilo; Mrs. Beke Keliikahi, secretary of Hilo; Mrs. Sarah Kaiwi, Mrs. Mary Kahenui, Mrs. Elena Mahaiula, Mrs. Helela, and Miss Kaimi Mahaiula, member of Hilo; Mrs. Emma Laeha, president of the association of Laupahoehoe, Mrs. Kealalaina Ne, from the association of Kohala, as well as Mr. Annie Hussey. Mrs. Becky Kawai and Mrs. Eliza Maguire from the association of Waimea, Mrs. Esther K. Haina, secretary of the association of Hamakua; Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana, Mrs. Haili Timoteo and Mrs. Bessie Kopa, from the parent association of Honolulu.

There were letters from Mrs. Aima Nawahi and Mrs. J. Saffery, the president of the Kaahumanu Society of Hamakua, expressing to their sisters of their aloha and of their support for this endeavor.

As for the two of us, the mothers who came to endorse this endeavor, we extend our unending thanks to the officers and members of the Evangelical association of the Island of Hawaii for their generosity in allowing us time to carry out our work for which we travelled over the ocean.

We also give our appreciation to the good kamaaina, Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Kamauoha, for their very kind hospitality in their comfortable home; and the head of the Church, Rev. E. S. Timoteo and his amiable wife, and we extend our thanks to the members of all the associations which joined in to help us for the good of the junior association of the calm of Kona. We also thank the brother of the Kaahumanu members, Rev. S. L. Desha, for his great assistance, as well as to our good sister: Mrs. Aima Nawahi for her assistance in planning to move the endeavor forward; and we also extend our thoughts of aloha and unending blessings to our kind kamaaina who lent her car to take us to where our duties took us, that being Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana of Honolulu.

We pray to our Heavenly Father to give great blessings upon us all; and we hope that with the assistance of benevolent God that you younger sisters of Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five  will move forward, and your works will progress, and may the sisterly love amongst us all last forever.

The two of us,

Lucy K. Peabody, president of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter 1.

Lahilahi Webb, Secretary.

March 31, 1913.

(Kuokoa, 4/11/1913, p. 2)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 11, 1913.