Liliuokalani’s horse riding association, 1892.

[Found under: "NU HOU KULOKO."]

A Summons—All the members of the Liliuokalani Horse Riding Association and Carriage Riding Association are invited. To gather at Iolani Palace, on the Palace Grounds, at 1 p. m. on the 4th of February. Heed this call.

By the orders of the President of the Association.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 2/3/1892, p. 3)

He Leo Poloai

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 382, Aoao 3. Feberuari 3, 1892.

 

Washington Place, 1895.

The Residence of Wasinetona Hale.

We are putting before you the picture of Washington Place on Beritania Street, Honolulu, not because it was the storage for guns and weapons for Liliuokalani, but because it is a very old building constructed in Honolulu nei. The foundation of this house was began with coral blocks by the one called Isaac Adams, for the mother of Governor Dominis, while her husband, Dominis, was sailing as captain aboard a ship from Honolulu to…

WASINETONA HALE

…China, trading with places of the North and then returning to Honolulu. And being that Mrs. Dominis, who accompanied her husband, fancied living here in Honolulu, and building a home here to live in, and forever more leaving her own home in the state of Massachusetts, her husband agreed to her request. It was perhaps 1842 when the foundation was laid, but it was not completed until the beginning of 1846. And on August 5, 1846, Captain Dominis left again on a ship under his leadership, but after he left Honolulu for China, there was no word that his ship landed on any dry land until this day.

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More on Kamehameha III 100th birthday memorial, 1914.

CENTENARY OF KAMEHAMEHA III IS MARKED WITH IMPRESSIVE SERVICE

Handsome Tablet Is Unveiled Accompanied by Sacred Chant of Loved King

The unveiling of a handsome tablet of Hawaiian lava granite, to the accompaniment of sacred chants composed a century ago, marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kauikeaouli, the third of the Kamehamehas, which yesterday afternoon was observed at old Kawaiahao church by the Daughters of Hawaii. It was a fitting memorial to that ruler who, known to his subjects as the beneficent king, gave to the inhabitants of these islands their first written constitution, and, to make the observance further complete, the tablet will be taken to Keauhou, Kona, where it will mark the birthplace of ka moi lokomaikai.

The historical structure of Kawaiahao, around which is woven innumerable tales dear to the heart of the kamaaina, was occupied by more than 2600 persons, the majority of whom were Hawaiian. The memorial tablet occupied the center of the platform, hidden from view by the royal standard of Liliuokalani and High Chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt, both lineal descendants of the Hawaiian King who was the founder of the Kamehameha dynasty. Feathered cloaks of almost priceless value draped the chairs in which they sat.

The strange, yet beautiful, setting doubtless was a perfect replica of a court scene in the days of the old regime when the Kamehameha held sway. The costuming of the participants was perfect, and there was presented a spectacle in which was brought out many ancient and rare relics which today are treasured by Honolulu families and which are seldom seen other than in private homes, where they are held almost sacred.

Attired in feather cloaks and helmets, High Chief Fred Kahapula Beckley and High Chief Albert Kalaninoanoa Hoapili, the spear and kahili bearers respectively, occupied places just back of the queen and High Chiefess Pratt, representing the figures which are seen on the royal Hawaiian coat-of-arms. Both are lineal descendants of chiefs of the court of Kamehameha I, High Chief Beckley being a descendant of Kameeiamoku, and High Chief Hoapili a descendant of Kamanawa, the royal kahili bearer. Boys from the Kamehameha school, to the number of 16, acted as court attendants and kahili bearers, and occupied places on either side of the court representatives. They were attired in feather capes and other accessories adopted by the Hawaiian warriors of other days. Above this gathering was suspended the royal standard of Kalakaua, as well as other Hawaiian flags, their colors blending in perfect harmony with the vivid green of the palms and ferns with which the nave was banked.

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Public invitation to celebration of Centenary of Kauikeaouli, 1914.

Centenary of Kauikeaouli

Kamehameha III.

Kawaiahao Church, Tuesday, March 17,

at 4 p. m.

Under the auspices of

The Daughters of Hawaii

HER MAJESTY QUEEN LILIUOKALANI

and

HIGH CHIEFESS ELIZABETH KEKAANIAU PRATT

will assist in the unveiling of the tablet to the memory of

KA MOI LOKOMAIKAI

(The Beneficent King.)

A cordial invitation is extended to the public to be present at this celebration.

(Star Bulletin, 3/11/1914, p. 8)

Centenary of Kauikeaouli

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXI, Number 6840, Page 8. March 11, 1914.

Kauikeaouli’s 100th birthday at Kawaiahao Church, 1914.

TRIBUTE PAID TO MEMORY OF KING

Hawaiians Celebrate Centenary of Kamehameha III with Impressive Ceremony—Queen Liliuokalani Unveils Tablet to Mark Birthplace of Beloved Monarch

(From Wednesday Advertiser.)

The centenary of Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, was celebrated yesterday at Kawaiahao Church under the auspices of the Daughters of Hawaii. This old church, that has witnessed so many of the royal ceremonials of the Hawaiian people, was taxed to the utmost of its seating capacity. More than twenty-six hundred persons viewed the unveilling of the memorial tablet which had been prepared by the Daughters of Hawaii to mark the birthplace of “The Generous King” at Keauhou, in Kai-malino, Hawaii.

The tablet was hidden from view by the Royal Standard of Liliuokalani and a Hawaiian flag, both the property of and loaned by Hawaii’s venerable ex-queen for the sacred ceremonial.

The Queen and High Chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniau Pratt, both of whom are lineal descendants of Keawe, the ancient king of Hawaii, and founder of the Kamehameha dynasty, were seated on either side of the memorial stone in the nave of the church. The palace chairs in which they sat were draped with ancient Hawaiian feather capes of priceless value.

Oldtime Dignitaries Attend.

Back of the Queen and High Chiefess Pratt were High Chiefs Beckley and Hoapili, clad in the ceremonial feather cloaks and helmets of the Royal Courtiers. High Chief Fred Kahapula Beckley, the spear-bearer, is a direct descendant through his father’s side from Kameeiamoku. High Chief Albert Kalaninoanoa Hoapili, the kahili bearer, is a lineal descendant of Kamanawa, the royal kahili bearer. These two therefore, in yesterday’s ceremony represented the spear-bearer and kahili bearer who are shown on the Hawaiian coat of arms and are descendants of the two chief court alii of Kamehameha I.

On either side of the royal court representatives were the kahili bearers in ordinary, sixteen young men from the Kamehameha School for Boys, robed in feather capes and the costumes of the warrior of old, representative of the court attendants.

The chancel and pulpit were tastefully decorated with beautiful ferns and palms while above was the Royal Standard of Kalakaua and the Hawaiian flags, both now the property of and loaned by the Kapiolani Estate.

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Monument to Kauikeaouli on his 100th birthday, 1914.

UNVEILING OF THE DONATED TABLET

The Populace Gathers in Kawaiahao on the Evening of this Past Tuesday.

It was a scene from the sacred times when the Islands were ruled under monarchs, that was before a great crowd of people which arrived at Kawaiahao Church in the afternoon of this past Tuesday, when a memorial service for the hundredth birthday of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III was held, and unveiled was the stone tablet dedicated to him that will be stood at the place of his birth at Keauhou, North Kona, Hawaii.

Before the hour set aside for that remembrance, at four o’clock in the afternoon, the crowd entered the church: from the members of the organizations of this town, the students of the Kamehameha Schools, the heads of the government, to the general public, filled up the church, with some people standing.

Outside of the church grounds was the Royal Hawaiian Band entertaining the people, with a majority of the people there, because they could not get a seat in the church.

Before the pulpit stood a painting of King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, and right below the painting was the tablet with clear lettering that said: “Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, ke keiki a Kamehameha III ame Keopuolani. Hanauia i Maraki 17,1814. Ka Moi lokomaikai.”

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Queen Liliuokalani, 1902.

SUPPORTS THE DELIVERER OF THE PEOPLE.

QUEEN LILIUOKALANI.

THE PICTURE ABOVE IS THE NEWEST OF QUEEN LILIUOKALANI, TAKEN RECENTLY BY MR. DAVEY, THE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THIS TOWN.

THE ROYAL AUNT LILIUOKALANI REVEALED HER THOUGHTS TO THE ALII KUHIO, SAYING: “IF YOU KNOW THAT THIS IS THE MEANS TO GAINING OUR WELL-BEING, THEN DO IT.”

(Kuokoa, 10/24/1902, p. 1)

KAKOO I KA HOOPAKELE O KA LAHUI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 24, 1902.

Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole, 1902.

THE DELIVERER OF THE HAWAIIANS.

PRINCE KALANIANAOLE.

THE PICTURE ABOVE IS OF THE PRINCE KUHIO KALANIANAOLE, THE NEPHEW OF QUEEN LILIUOKALANI; HE IS THE REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR THE REPRESENTATIVE TO WASHINGTON RUNNING THIS SEASON.

BEFORE HE AGREED TO JOIN THE REPUBLICAN PARTY, HE WENT FIRST TO HIS ROYAL AUNTY, THE QUEEN, AND EXPLAINED TO HER ALL OF HIS THOUGHTS, AND ASKED FOR HER THOUGHTS.

(Kuokoa, 10/24/1902, p. 1)

KA HOOPAKELE O KA LAHUI HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 24, 1902.

Stopping by at Washington, D. C. on the way to see the Queen, 1887.

KING KALAKAUA’S WIFE.

QUEEN KAPIOLANI ARRIVES AT OUR NATIONAL CAPITAL.

Arrangements Made for the Queen to Call on the President and Mrs. Cleveland—A Benevolent Creature on Her Way to Visit Victoria—Queen Emma.

QUEEN KAPIOLANI.

Washington, May 4.—Queen Kapiolani, of the Hawaiian Islands, who arrived in San Francisco on April 20, arrived in Washington to-day and immediately went to the Arlington Hotel. Arrangements have been made for the queen to call on the president and Mrs. Cleveland at noon on Wednesday. The queen and suite will arrive here early Tuesday evening and go at once to the Arlington. A time will be appointed by the queen during her stay here for the diplomatic corps to call on her, and she will also probably receive calls from the naval officers who have been stationed at Honolulu, all of whom have met her majesty, and many of whom have danced with her.

After spending a few days here sight-seeing she will go to New York. From there she goes to England to be present at the Queen’s jubilee. She has never been out of her own country before, and is quite anxious to see the “greatest woman on the face of the earth,” as she calls Queen Victoria. Queen Kapiolani is not of what is known as royal blood in Honolulu. Strictly speaking neither is King Kalakaua of royal blood, as he was elected to the throne and did not inherit it. Continue reading

A mele by Liliuokalani, 1896.

Ke Aloha Aina.

He lei he aloha keia la,
No kuu one hanau,
Kona mau kualono uliuli,
Na lau nahele kupaoa.

Hui—Puili mai a paa iloko,
Ke aloha i ka aina,
Haliu i ka Mea Mana,
A e ola no ka lahui.

He aloha la he aloha,
No kuu lahui oiwi,
I hookahi puuwai,
Kupaa me ka lokahi.

He aloha la he aloha,
Ka makani o ka aina,
I ka pa kolonahe mai,
A ka makani la he Moae.

E alu ka pule i ka Haku,
Me ka naau haahaa,
E noi me ka walohia,
E maliu mai no Ia.

Na ke Aliiaimoku.

[Patriotism.

A song of adornment, a song of love,
For my homeland,
Her verdant mountainsides,
The fragrant forest foliage.

Chorus—Embraced and held tightly within,
Love for this land,
Look towards the Almighty,
And the lahui shall live.

A song of love, a song of love,
For my native people,
Of one heart,
Steadfast in unity.

A song of love, a song of love,
The wind of the land,
Blowing gently
The wind, the Moae.

Pray as one to the Lord,
With humble hearts,
Beseech with reverence,
He shall pay heed.

By the Ruling Alii]

[Sometimes just doing a search using terms like "Liliuokalani," "Liliu," "Liliuonamoku," "Liliuonalani," "Moiwahine," &c., will not bring up all there is to find...

It would be very useful if there perhaps was a central place where people could add their finds to various topics, like in this case, mele by Liliuokalani.]

(Makaainana, 10/5/1896, p. 1)

Ke Aloha Aina.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI—-Ano Hou, Helu 14, Aoao 1. Okatoba 5, 1896.