Honokaa School May Day, 1942.

MAY DAY & LEI DAY

Honokaa School Park
Friday, May 1, 1942

Mr. Herman Larsgard, Principal
Mrs. Hattie L. S. Reinhardt, Chairman
Mr. Roy Mitsuka, Announcer
Miss Sueko Higashi, Information & Phone
Mr. Robert Main, Carpenter, Stage

9:30–11:30 A. M.

Sound of bugles or shell horns announcing the
Appearance of May Queen, Miss Hannah Akini
(Everybody clapping hands)
May Day & Lei Day Prayer, Reverend Abraham Poepoe

Sound of bugles everybody steps into his place for the
May Day & Lei Day Parade

May Day Queen leads the parade with her attendants,
followed by the rest in the other of the parade

Queen walks to her chair on the stage, her attendants stand in
their places, the Queen bids ALOHA to everybody and asks
them to sit in their places

Chant:—HOOKUPUS to the MAY QUEEN
(Queen thanks for the HOOKUPUS)

Hawaiian Hulas, Mrs. C. Hermann & Girls
Hawaiian Music, Auna Family Troupe
Impersonation, Don Blanding, originator of
Lei Day in Hawaii, Dr. C. L. Carter
Song: “May Day is Lei Day in Hawaii,” The whole Honokaa School (Led by Mrs. Carl Braun)
May Day and Lei Day Cheerio, Mr. Kim and Cheer Leaders

Hawaiian Games:
Mrs. A. G. Robertson, 1A—Hawaiian Menehunes at work and disappear behind stage
Mrs. Annie Awong, 2A—Hawaiian Yo Yo
Mrs. M. Hayakawa, 1B—Gathering flowers and ti leaves
Mrs. Daisy Souza, 2B—Stringing leis
Mrs. M. Meyers, 2B—String games
Mrs. L. McGillivray, 4A—Slapping game
Mrs. H. Reinhardt, 4B—Play Pio
Mrs. E. Montgomery, 3A—Hawaiian May Pole Dance
Mr. C. Kobayashi, 3B—Uma, Skip rope
Mrs. J. Fraser, 5A—Make flower kahilis, paper capes
Mr. J. Souza, 5B—Sling shots and send runners to get the maa stone and return them to Queen
Mrs. C. Gordon, 6A—Make flower kahilis, paper capes
Mr. Robert Hayakawa, 7—Fishing: rod & line, throw net, torch fishing, hukilau
Surfing with surf boards, Spearing fish
Hawaiian School, Mrs. Hattie Reinhardt
Hawaiian Hulas & Hawaiian Songs, Auna Family Troupe
Mrs. Kekoalani & Girls
Musical Selections (8 or 10 pieces), Army Band
Leader, Sgt. Mitchell
Hawaii Ponoi
Star-Spangled Banner

ORDER OF MAY & LEI DAY PARADE

JUNIOR POLICE
American Flag
Honokaa Unit Soldiers
Majorettes (2) Juliet Paiva, Catherine Paiva & Antonina Figueroa
Army Band
Scout Boys, Elder Weeks—Scout Girls, Mrs. Virginia Torres
Mrs. A. G. Robertson, 1A Pennant “ALOHA”
Mrs. A. Awong, 1B Pennant, “LEI DAY IN HONOKAA”
Mrs. M. Hayakawa, 2A, Pennant, “MAY DAY IN HONOKAA”
Mrs. D. Souza, 2B, Pennant, “Hauoli Kakou”
Mrs. M. Meyers, 2B, Pennant, “MINOAKA”
Mrs. Montgomery, 3A, Pennant, “HULA HULA”
Mr. C. Kobayashi, 6B, Pennant, “Penei Hoi”
Mrs. L. McGillivray, 4A, Pennant, “Auwe Nohoi Oe”
Mrs. H. L. Reinhardt, 4B, Pennant, “Lanakila”
Mrs. J. Fraser, 5A, Pennant, “Hele Malie”
Mrs. J. Souza, 5B, Pennant, “MANAOLANA”
Mr. R. Hayakawa, 7, Pennant, “Lawaia”
7th grade and teacher,
8th grade and teacher,
9th grade and teacher,
10th grade and teacher,
11th grade and teacher,
12th grade and teacher.
Scouts lead Army to bleachers and all the children to their seats on bleachers.

Mr. I Fukuda, Type Programs
Miss M. Genung, Girl Reserves
Mrs. M. Chen, Make ilima paper leis
Mrs. H. Spalding, Red Cross
Mrs. Kobatake, Majorettes (Juliette Paiva & Sisters)
Miss Takano, Make paper leis
Mrs. C. Braun, Make paper ilima leis
Mrs. Ethel Blackadar, Chairman, Decorate Stage
Mr. Yamauchi, Mr. K. Hayakawa, Janitors, Helpers
Mrs. Mollison & Mrs. Torres, Prepare May Day Lunch
Mr. R. Kim, Pennants

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/29/1942, p. 4)

MAY DAY & LEI DAY

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVII, Number 1, Aoao 4. Apelila 29, 1942.

Lei Day in Lahaina, 1944.

[Found under: “Na Hunahuna Mea Hou O Maui”]

Lei Making is Held

Last week, an event was held to commemorate Lei Day by the classes of Lahainaluna School.

The May Day queen was Kuulei Bechert and her attendant was Theone Freeland.

The featured things at this event were the display of items of koa, the lei, lauhala and applique quilt [kapa apana]. The koa display was from Mrs. G. Alan Freeland, and lauhala was done by Mrs. C. K. Kunane. The lei were done by some classes of the school watched over by Hannah Reimann.

Also undertaken was the selling of war bonds and the proceeds reached $10,000.

The quilt, “Ka Lama o Lahainaluna” [The Light of Lahainaluna] was on a dark background with a pattern of kukui leaves, fruit, and torch, which was spread out to be seen.

Mrs. John T. Moir, Jr., was the adviser of this event, and Mrs. Alice Banham was her assistant along with William McWayne; they were the supervisors of this program.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/17/1944, p. 1)

Malama Na Hana Lei

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIX, Number 4, Aoao 1. Mei 17, 1944.

University of Hawaii Lei Day Queen, 1936.

Hilo Girl Is Lei Queen At University

Flanked by her six retainers, Esther Waihee, of Hilo, first freshman ever chosen lei queen of the University of Hawaii, is shown as she appeared ruling over the university Lei Day pageant. The girls are left to right, Puamana Akana, Ellen Stewart, Mele Aiona, Miss Waihee, Carol Ross, Rosalind Phillips and Kaliko Burgess.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/13/1936, p. 1)

Hilo Girl Is Lei Queen At University

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXI, Number 3, Aoao 1. Mei 13, 1936.

May Day in Hilo town, 1942.

Our Lei Day

According to what we understand and hear pertaining to the celebration of Lei Day, that being this Friday, the show put on will be great.

There will be two hula groups that will hula on that day, that being the hula troupe [Hui Lokelani] of Mrs. Rose Kuamoo and the Hui Huapala led by Albert Nahale-a. Other than these groups will be the Police Glee Club led by William K. Kahimoku (Kualii), and also the children of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kalima, and also perhaps some duets and some solos.

Last year, this show was held in the evening, beginning at 6:00, but this year, it can’t be put on in the late evening, but instead will be held at 3:00  p. m. This is times of blackout in this land, and we are not to turn on lights outside.

This show and hula will be held at Kalakaua Square, and we are lucky to have the military band join in and commemorate this day. There is nothing to be said about our County Band, for they have not dropped out of the activities of the day.

The activities of the day will begin with a concert put on by the military band at port here in Hilo, at 2:30 p. m. until 3:00 p. m., and the County band until 3:30 p. m. and followed by the other parts.

Here below is the program of events of that afternoon

MAY DAY IS LEI DAY
IN HAWAII
Directed by the Hawaiian Civic Club of Hilo
Friday, May 1, 1942,
at the Hour of 3:30 P. M.
KALAKAUA PARK

Part I, Old Hawaiian Hula

1. “Ka La o Mei He La Lei Ia Ma Hawaii” [May Day is Lei Day in Hawaii] Police Glee Club, Lokelani, and Huapala.

2. “Oli” by Mary Ahiena

3. Old Hawaiian Hula, by the Hui Lokelani.

a. Olapa — Niihau, Pua Hau o Maleka

b. Puili — Malualua

c. Iliili — Kona Hema

d. Uliuli — Moku Kia Kahi, Alekoki

4. Combined Old Hawaiian Hula, by the Hui Huapala

a. Puili & Uliuli — Nani Wale Na Hala

5. “Pua Mohala” by the Hilo Police Glee Club

Part II, Hawaiian Hula of Modern Times

1. “Kuikahi” by Huapala

2. A Hula for President Roosevelt, Lokelani

3. “Ua Hoomaka lakou i Kekahi Mea,” Frank Kahili

4. Holoholo Kaa, Huapala

5. “Loke Honesakala,” Ernest Hanaike and his Guitar

6. Nani Hilo, Lokelani

7. “Mele Maka Lalau” by Baby Kaieie

9. “Wiliwili Wai,” William Kualii

8. Aloha Ia No O Maui, Lokelani

10. Kona Hema, Huapala

11. My Sweet Sweetie, Three Children of Kalaima

12. Oahu, Lokelani

13. Ke Kali Nei Au, duet by Miss Kuaana Nathaniel and Joseph Kalima

14. Maikai Wale No Kauai, Lokelani

15. “TAHUAHUAI,” Abraham Laeha

16. Sasa & Somemore o Samoa, Huapala

17. THE CONCLUSION

a. Hilo March — Lokelani

b. “I Lei Nou” — Police Glee Club

c. Leahi, Hanohano Hanalei — Huapala

18. ALOHA OE

19. STARS SPANGLED BANNER

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/29/1942, p. 2)

Ka La Lei O Kakou

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume 37, Number 1, Page 2. Apelila 29, 1942.

And more yet from Lei Day in Hilo, 1928.

The lei that took first prize and made with great skill by Mrs. Lulu Kawelu—that truly beautiful lei was made from the flowers called “Ka ui o Olaa”¹ [Olaa Beauty], and it was made in 4 hours and a half by Mrs. Kawelu.

¹This plant is also known as “Nani o Olaa”.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/8/1928, p. 2)

O kela lei i lilo ai ka makana helu ekahi...

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXI, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Mei 8, 1928.

More Lei Day in Hilo, 1928.

DAY TO CELEBRATE LEI IN HILO

On Tuesday last week, Hilo held a celebration and display of flower lei of all sorts, and this was done at the Bank of Hawaii in Hilo. All types of lei were brought down and they were made will all kinds of flowers of all types, and prizes of all kinds were prepared of gold coins [dala gula?].

The doors of the Bank were opened at seven in the morning, and lei of all types were brought in from then on until 10:00 A. M. of that morning, and then the doors were closed to bring in the judges.

However the bringing in of lei to put on display by others after that was not barred. Entered were all types of lei of all sorts; for instance, lei made of various flowers, and some lei were woven with the buds of the lehua, and lei hinahina, and lei pukamole of all sorts. Also brought for display were some oo bird feathers, and feather lei of various birds, but they were not there for judging, they were just there to show the many beautiful kinds. Some of those lei of oo bird feathers are valued at $1,700 for one.

The placing of the various lei were organized by the Committee chosen earlier, and also chosen before were the judges who would decide which lei won the prizes, and they were Miss Ivy Richardson, Mrs. Emily Sexton, and Mrs. S. L. Desha, Sr. Also selected was the one who would announce the winning lei and he would also hand out the prizes decided upon by the lei judges.

From the time when the Bank was opened until the time when the awards were given, there was approximately five-thousand visitors who entered to look at the many lei, and voices of appreciation were heard from the mouths of many attendees, and the crowd expressed their joint feelings to rouse this new Hawaiian spirit, and that this event will be commemorated always from now on. There were countless [hewa i ka wai] lei that were crafted of all sorts, and it was truly a difficult task for the Judges to give their decision on some of these lei.

When the many lei were brought in, the name of the maker was immediately announced, and a number was given to the lei, so therefore the judges did not know who strung the lei, or crafted them with great skill.

When the period for the competition lei to be entered was over and the doors were closed to the entry of lei competing for the various prizes, the judges began to examine each lei, paying attention to make up of the lei, and how it was crafted, and how cleanly it was made and how neat they were as well. [They were judged] not on just how pretty the flowers were, but on how the lei were made.

In the examination by the Judging Committee, their job was tremendous, being that there were just so many beautiful-looking lei of all sorts, but some were distinguished by how they were made, in that they were woven with true craftsmanship, or by how the flowers were sewn into the lei. By those qualities did they hand down each of their judgements.

There were two competition divisions that were entered, those being lei entered by individual lei makers, and lei entered by a group, and many different schools entered their lei. The Judges awarded the First Place Prize to the beautiful lei entered by Mrs. Lulu Kawelu, and that was a prize of $30.00 and the second place prize went to Miss Charlotte Lyman, $20.00.

To the Women’s Association of Hilo went the first prize of $20.00, for the lei entered by a group; and the First Place Prize of $20.00 for the beautiful lei entered by a skilled maker of lei—to Mrs. Susie Naope with a lei of Red Lehua skillfully woven  and wound with white lehua, and by weaving this lei, that prize went to her.

As for the schools, the prize of $15.00 went to the Mauna Huihui School, and the second place to the school children of Puumaile Home, a prize of $10.00.

To Hilo Junior High School went the first place, and to Kapiolani School the second place; $15.00 was the first prize and $10.00 was the second prize. The school that was the luckiest was the Kurtistown School, whose principal is Miss Mary Nailima—to them went the first prize and second prize, $15.00 and $10.00.

Kahu S. L. Desha, Sr. announced the winners of the prizes and it was he who presented the prizes. Some people had all sorts of ideas regarding the decisions of the judges, but the Judging Committee did as they thought was right. It is difficult indeed to please everyone, but they did what they could, and should you, O Fault Finders, be in their place, there mostly surely would be those faulting your decisions. The thing sensed by the crowd there at that time was the new Hawaiian spirit; and this event will become something that reawakens the spirit of Hawaii of times past.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/8/1928, p. 2)

KA LA HOOMANAO LEI MA HILO

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXI, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Mei 8, 1928.