Makalei Cave, North Kona, Hawaii, 1924.

ENJOYMENT OF TIME

DESCRIPTION OF MAKALEI

This is a cave to the south of the hill of Akahipuu, and it was there that a man named Ko’amokumoku-o-hueia [Ko'amokumokuoheeia] lived, who came from Koolau and settled here, living as a newcomer.

And he lived here with his family: his wife, whose name was Kahaluu; and their two daughters; and one young son named Makalei.

And it was for this boy that this cave is called the cave of Makalei until this day.

While this man was living here, he began to farm taro, sweet potato, banana, sugar cane, and awa; and it all appeared to be well watered.

The natives of the area came to him and said, “The problem with this land is the water; it is a land without water, and you have to get water from the cave, but the places to store water here are kapu and cannot be fetched from in secret; if you are caught, you will be killed by the one who the water belongs.

Ko’amokumoku-o-heeia heard this talk of the locals, and this caused him to contemplate about where he and his family could get their water; and therefore, he made a reservoir [pa-o wai ?] for himself, and when the rains returned, water would fill receptacles [haona] then be held in the reservoir.

While living there with the family, one day, the boy went to relieve himself at a ravine behind their house, and while he was throwing the old waste into a plain old hole, right then wind blew out from that hole, and Makalei examined it and saw this deep, dark hole.

This boy was however not frightened at all; he stood up and went to where his father was farming and said:

“I went over there to defecate, but this is the astonishing thing, there was a lot of wind coming from that pit, maybe it is a hole of winds.”

“Where?” the father asked. “Down there,” and the father went to see.

When Ko’amokumoku-o-heeia reached the area and cleared away the stones covering the hole, he saw that it was a deep cave and wind rose from it as if it came from the mountains.

He turned and said to the child, “We have our place to hold water for our life here in this land without water, and I will make a hole for us to defecate in.”

The mouth to the cave was finished off nicely and there they defecated; while one side of the opening was made so that a person could enter.

No kamaaina knew of this cave, and he did not tell his wife, and nor did he talk of it again to his son; he totally refused to speak of the things pertaining to this cave.

One day, he entered the cave and saw the great vastness, and that he could walk upright without his head touching the wall above, and there was a lot of water dripping down; he decided to make containers [waa] of ohia, and containers of wiliwili.

In the night he fetched wiliwili and carried it on his back inside the cave, and it was inside of the cave that he dug until he made the opening of the wiliwili water container; the ohia chosen was dug out by the farmer and he carried it on his back into the cave. The inside of the cave grew criss-crossed with water troughs of wiliwili and ohia; there was just so many of the water containers that continued to be fitted inside.

When the dry season of this land returned as always, he did nothing other than farm, and he had ample water and had no problems with it.

It was at night that he fetched water and filled containers and gourds [olo], until the reservoir was full, and this was their drinking water for the month, and so forth.

The locals were suspicious about where these people go their water from, being that they did not see the source of their water, and they spoke often about the water of these malihini.

This cave still remains, and the entrance is very small but made like the entrance to a house, but within is very spacious and the walls are very tall.

When Maguire lived at Huehue, a great water catchment was built inside of the cave and a pipe was laid from the catchment until his house because he wanted cold water like ice water; also, pipes were laid above the catchment so that more water would go into it.

The story of this boy, Makalei is a beautiful one, along with his father, and it is a very long story; and should the writer have time to write this touching entertainment, then Makalei will be seen, the one whose name this cave is named after, Makalei Cave.

Here we will list the famous storied places [wahi pana kaulana] of these ahupuaa, from the sea until the summit of the mountain of Hualalai. With their names that they were called by the people of old.

1. Kileo hill.

2. Kaaialalaua.

3. Kapuukao.

4. Pahulu.

5. Moanuiahea.

6. Puumamaki.

7. Puuiki.

8. Puukoa.

9. Kaiwopele [Kaiwiopele].

10. Puuuhinuhinu.

11. Kahuaiki.

12. Kamawae.

13. Hikuhia, in the uplands of Napua.

14. Uau pooole [Uaupooole].

15. Na hale o Kaua [Nahaleokaua].

16. Kipuka o Oweowe.

17. Pualala.

18. Kawahapele.

19. Keoneeli.

20. Hinakapoula.

21. Kalulu.

22. Na puu Mahoe [Napuumahoe].

23. Kumu mamane [Kumumamane].

24. Kaluamakani.

25. Pohokinikini.

26. Hopuhopu.

27. Kipahee.

28. Hanakaumalu.

29. Kapuu o Honuaula [Honuaula Hill].

30. Ka puu o Hainoa [Hainoa Hill].

31. The summit of Hualalai and the pit of Milu.

32. Kipahee.

33. Makanikiu, Hill.

The pit of Milu [lua o Milu] spoken of is the pit which Hikuikanahele went to fetch Kawelu under the [Nuu ?] of Milu, the chief of the dark night; this is the round pit atop the summit of Hualalai which still remains to this day; it is a very deep hole and if you drop a rock down the pit, you will not hear the rattling of the rock.

The width of the mouth of this pit is perhaps about 6 to 7 feet in my estimation as I am familiar with those regions.

The water of Kipahee is a pit which goes down and reaches a spring.

It is not rippling water from which to scoop water out of, but it is moss [limu] which you collect until the container is full and then return to the top.

Climbing back up is troublesome; should you try to go straight up thinking you will exit immediately, you won’t be able to because you will keep sliding back until you are sitting after exhaustion from sliding down. In order to return to the top with ease, you have to climb zigzag, turning to the right and then to the left, and that is how you climb back to the top easily.

(Not complete.)

[This article continues into the next issue (6/5/1924, p. 4) and is signed: "Ka Ohu Haaheo I na Kuahiwi Ekolu. Kona Hawaii, April 30 1924."]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/29/1924, p. 4)

NA HOONANEA O KA MANAWA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XVIII, Helu 1, Aoao 4. Mei 29, 1924.

Replanting of native plants, 1901!

HAWAIIAN PLANTS WILL BE GROWN AGAIN.

Under the direction of Mr. Haughs, the nurseryman of the government, the planting of Hawaiian plants in the valley of Nuuanu will be attempted, to make that valley verdant once again with native plants, so that it will be just as beautiful as it was fifty or more years ago. These seedlings were sent by Ebena Lo [Eben Low] from his residence at Puuwaawaa, Hawaii, to Commissioner Taylor, those being aaka, holei, aalii, ohia, kolea, opiko, akia, alahee, kauila, uhiuhi, iliahi, lama, and olapa.

It is said that it has been about 50 years that these plants were growing in abundance in Nuuanu Valley, for with the influx of animals and the mass cutting of trees for firewood, the beautiful forest of times gone by became a barren field.

The government will spend a sum of money to grow and foster this new forest, however, we believe that there is no way that the beauty of the forest which God grew originally and which was damaged by man will be attained by this new forest which is intended to be grown.

(Aloha Aina, 12/7/1901, p. 4)

E HOOULU HOU IA ANA NA LAAU HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VII, Helu 49, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 7, 1901.

Another Wooden Kii found, 1868.

Akua Kii from Kalia.

Most of the people reading Ke Alaula have not seen an akua kii, but a small fraction have seen one, and some of you saw this image that is shown here in this issue. Last year, this god idol was found by the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa on the banks of a fish pond at Kalia in Paalaa Uka in Waialua. That large piece of wood was set down and covered with soil near the sluice gate of that large fish pond. When that big piece of wood was unearthed, lo and behold, it was a carved god. It was brought to Honolulu nei, and through the goodwill of the Alii Elder who owns Kalia fishpond, that kii was given to the college of Kapunahou [Punahou], and there it stands in the exhibition room of curiosities at Kapunahou. When some of you go to visit Kapunahou, ask the children there about the kii from Waialua, and it will be shown to you where it stands.

This kii was probably thrown into the pond of Kalia in the year 1819; that is the year when there was the kii of Hawaii nei were greatly abandoned. Some of them were burnt in fire and some were thrown into the sea.

These ohia wood images were worshiped by previous generations. The kupuna of the educated children of Waialua Sunday School were probably those that knelt down and worshiped this piece of wood.

How astonishing are the actions of the people of all of the pagan lands, who worship idols that are carved or molded by their own hands. That is how all lands are where the word of God has not reached.

Pieces of wood, fragments of rock, chunks of silver, chunks of metal, or perhaps chunks of iron turned into images—those are the gods cared for by millions of people, in heiau, houses of god, mountains, caves, banks of rivers, and in forests; they worship before them thinking that from these gods come well being, wealth, and life in body and spirit.

Here also is a picture of a Hindu man worshiping his godly image; it is a snake carved into a rock.

This is something that pains the heart to see the darkness and trouble of those that don’t know of the God the Savior, the one who came down to save all man. Because they don’t know him, they seek salvation from rocks and pieces of wood and from actions that hurt their very own bodies. When you pray, “Thy kingdom come,” remember the pagans so that the light reaches them quickly.

[Could this Akua Kii be the one now at the Bishop Museum which was found in Waialua and presented to Punahou?]

(Alaula, 1/1868, p. 39)

KE AKUA KII O KALIA.

Ke Alaula, Buke II, Helu 10, Aoao 39. Ianuari, 1868.

Wooden Kii found in Haleiwa, 1906.

[Found under: "This and That"]

Rev. W. D. Westervelt found a wooden akua image made of ohia that was 8 feet in length in a taro patch near the Haleiwa Hotel. This kalaipahoa was sent was sent to the museum of Kamehameha School.

(Na’i Aupuni, 8/30/1906, p. 3)

Ua loaa mai nei ia Rev W D Westervel...

Ka Na'i Aupuni, Buke II, Helu 76, Aoao 3. Augate 30, 1906.