Building for movies and entertainment to be built in Kalaupapa, 1915.

ANNOUNCEMENT

Because of the benevolence of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], by them taking up the building of a Movie and Entertainment House for the Patient Colony [Kahua Ma’i] here, we therefore revoke our Requests put out by us to the Fundraising Committees which were approved by us. As for the Committees that collected money for this endeavor, please send it to the Secretary of the Committee, Mr. Joseph Aiona, or to the Superintendent [Lunanui] of this Patient Colony, Mr. J. D. McVeigh.

By way of the Committee, the people of the Patient Colony send their boundless thanks to the Fundraising Committees [Komite Ohi Dala] for this work, and to all those who gave their donation. May God bless us all in the Name of Jesus, Amen.  JOSEPH AIONA,

Secretary.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/30/1915, p. 3)

OLELO HOOLAHA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 10, Helu 30, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 30, 1915.

Pidgin from down in Kalaupapa, 1882.

NEWS OF MOLOKAI.

O Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation, the lightning that flashes over the cliff brows of the islands. Greeting between us.

In the area of Puuhahi, Kalaupapa, Molokai, there were deplorable incidences, and those where these. There was sweet potato being fermented in pots, and this made the dormitory into a place of fighting because of drunkenness, along with the speaking of these words:

“Kokami iu palali kanaka! Iu anu faita, ai am solon, mi kivi iu kut polo, mi inilis man,” while he punched the wall of the building.

These are people who were appointed with positions from the Board of Health [Papa Ola] with the thought that it would be of help. Then this reprehensible thing happened between the locals [kamaaina] and the leprosy patients.

The gray-haired old men of Kalaupapa are surfing these days, and the land is being left fallow in the sun [??? ke hele la a mauakea (?? mahakea) i ka la.]

To the metal type-setting boys goes my aloha.

W. S. Kekuni.

Puhahi, Molokai, Nov. 18, 1882.

[Any ideas what is being said in pidgin? I will post what I think it says tomorrow morning.]

(Kuokoa, 12/9/1882, p. 3)

NA MEA HOU O MOLOKAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXI, Helu 49, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 9, 1882.

Robert K. Bonine film, 1921.

Leper Settlement is Shown in New Aspect

An attractive and unusual film of scenes from the Molokai settlement has been displayed to a party of friends by Robert K. Bonine, Honolulu photographer and pioneer in the exposition abroad of Hawaii through the moving picture, reports the Advertiser. Among those at the “first night” at Mr. Bonine’s studio in the Oregon building were Dr. A. L. Dean, president of the University of Hawaii, Frederick E. Trotter, president of the board of health, and Dr. G. A. Barton. Continue reading

More heirs to leprosy patients, 1902.

EXECUTIVE NOTICE

ANNOUNCEMENT OF HEIRS.

The heirs of the Leprosy Patients who died at the Leprosy Colony on Molokai, whose names appear below, are wanted to put before the Office of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], Kapuaiwa Hale, their claims to the remaining money of the estate of the ones who died, within two weeks from this day.

ARTHUR KAWAIELI (m) from Honolulu; 38 years old; taken to the Kahua Ma’i on July 25, 1893; died, March 5, 1900.

PILA PELO (m) from Puowaina, Honolulu; 22 years old; taken on October 25, 1898; died, August 18, 1900.

AH PAT (m) from Lahaina, Maui; 50 years old; taken on March 22, 1893; died, February 6, 1901. Continue reading

Heirs of those who died at the leprosy colony, 1900.

PROCLAMATION OF HEIRS.

The heirs of the patients who died in the leprosy colony, Molokai, named below, are wanted to put before the Office of the Board of Health [Papa Ola] with proper validation, their claims for the remainder of the estate of the ones who died, within six (6) months of this day, or the money will go to benefit the Treasury of the Government.

Akoi Akamu (m) from Wailuku, Maui, 29 years old; taken to the Colony of the Sick [Kahua Ma’i] on July 15, 1891; died on January 24, 1900.

Arthur Kawaieli (m) from Honolulu, 38 years old; taken to the Colony of the Sick on July 25, 1893; died on March 5, 1900. Continue reading

Dogs and the Leprosy Colony, 1903.

DOGS TO BE TAKEN

The Board of Health [Papa Ola] released a new rule which was approved by Governor S. B. Dole, ordering each and every leprosy patient and kokua of the leprosy colony of Molokai, that they may not keep more than one dog. The supervisor will enforce these new rules of the Board of Health.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 6)

HOPU IA NA ILIO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 6. Aperila 25, 1903.

Kokua being sent out of Kalaupapa, 1903.

Desire to Live in Kalaupapa

According to reports, most of the assistants [kokua] and the people who have been diagnosed not to have leprosy have requested of the Board of Health to remain in Kalaupapa.

Amongst these requests, four have staunchly opposed their being removed from the place of the sick. In accordance with the thought of the Board of Health, some requests were granted while others were denied.

The petitions of Mrs. Jessie Kaeana and Mrs. Lahela Amaka for their husbands to go to the colony as kokua were approved, and Superintendent McVeigh [Lunanui Maka-we] helped in this.

C. Kopena, a kokua that was ordered by the Board of Health to leave, asked that the decision be changed. The Board of Health gave the 31st of August as his last day to live in the colony. Kopena stated that he lived there for a long time and has not in the least gone against the Board of Health. When he left for the colony, he sold all of his assets, believing that he would spend the rest of his days there; and now, he is unable to return to the outside world unless he has supplies. If the Board is set upon his leaving, he needs to be given a home outside, and if not, he will become a vagabond of the earth.

According to Superintendent McVeigh, Kopena refuses to work, and has tried to join in with the rest of the kokua to defy the power of the Board of Health. For this reason, the request was denied.

McVeigh stated that when telling Kopena the Board of Health decided to remove him from the colony, Kopena said, “ko ke hele”┬╣, and that he would be staying.

That was not the case of Mr. and Mrs. Imihia. They asked the Board to allow the two of them to live there because they have no ohana left living, and they don’t have enough money to sustain them for two days.

Mr. McVeigh asked that they live in the colony and he said that Imihia works hard and is a farmer. The request was approved.

The request of Simms was denied for him to continue living in the colony, because he was suspected of having leprosy, but he will be released after he receives his clearance.

According to the explanation of McVeigh, Simms is one of the most lazy blacks that he has seen, and he should be sent out to work for himself.

The request of Sam Kaaiko and his wife was approved to go to the colony to visit their child.

Mrs. H. K. Aylett’s request was denied to take her young child to the colony.

┬╣Hawaiianization of the phrase, “go to hell.”

(Kuokoa, 8/7/1903, p. 3)

Ua Makemake e Noho i Kalaupapa

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 32, Aoao 3. Augate 7, 1903.