More on Queen Liliuokalani and the Red Cross, 1917.

Liliuokalani Becomes Red Cross Member As Whistles Signify 8000 Mark Is Reached

Queen Liliuokalani receiving a Red Cross card from Mrs. Gerrit Wilder after her contribution of a $100 check to the fund.

Her Majesty Queen Liliuokalani today became a patron member of the American Red Cross.

Seated in her wheel chair on the broad lanai of her home at Washington Place she handed over to Mrs. Gerrit Wilder, chairman of Division No. 1, the hundred dollar check which gave her patron membership in the national organization. Mrs. Wilder in turn placed one of the little Red Cross cards in the venerable lady’s hands and thanked her for the generous gift.

“It is with the deepest appreciation that I accept this gift from you on behalf of the Red Cross,” said Mrs. Wilder. “This is another of your many deeds of kindness and generosity.”

Queen Liliuokalani bowed gently and a sweet smile came over her face. She spoke a word or two in answer, turning to Mrs. Wilder and to Mrs. William Todd and Mrs. E. White Sutton, the other member of the visiting committee.

Curtins P. Iaukea, the queen’s secretary, pointed to the card which she held, telling her that she was now a member of the organization for which it stood. People all over the city are giving to this cause, he said.

Just then another of the whistles that were announcing the swiftly increasing subscriptions began to blow. Col. Iaukea inquired and was told that this was the whistle signifying 8000 had been reached.

“That is 8000 now,” said the secretary. “Eight thousand members this morning.”

“Eight thousand,” said the queen, pronouncing the words slowly and distinctly, and her face lighted.

“And you are the eight thousandth,” Col. Iaukea told her.

Queen Liliuokalani was gowned this morning in black, with a small white shawl over her shoulders. About her neck was a beautiful pink and white lei of flowers, while a crown-shaped comb held her white hair.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 9/29/1917, p. 2)

Liliuokalani Becomes Red Cross Member As Whistles Signify 8000 Mark Is Reached

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7945, Page 2. September 29, 1917.

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Liliuokalani’s personal adornments sold, 1924.

Liliu’s Gold Necklaces are Auctioned Off.

In accordance with the wishes of the deceased Queen Liliuokalani, the board of trustees of the estate of the the deceased announced the auctioning off of the gold adornments of the deceased queen. In one of the rooms on the bottom of the Young Hotel in Honolulu, on this Tuesday, March 25, the auction began of the adornments: the diamond rings, the diamond bracelets, the diamond necklaces, the earrings, the stickpins, and many other items. Colonel C. Piehu Iaukea made known the wishes of Liliuokalani to build a house to care for orphaned girls of all ethnicities, in Honolulu, and the Hawaiian girls were the first in her heart.

On the first day, this Tuesday, $11,360.50 was made. The auction was continued on another day. It is not known what the total is at this time.

The houses intended for these orphaned children probably cannot be built with just the funds from these jewels, because these valuables were sold in Honolulu at a place where it was believed that they would go for cheap, and the gold craftsmen of Honolulu said that the prices bid on these treasures of Hawaii nei were just like throwing them away. If it was held in a town of ten million people or more, like London, New York, or Paris, where millionaires reside, then proper prices might have been gotten, however, here in Hawaii, where there are no millionaires, high prices are not attained.

Perhaps if it is included with the rest of Liliuokalani’s estate, then it will be enough to build this type of facility, for it will need over a hundred thousand more dollars for that kind of place. On top of that is the expenses for the care taking and for the executives, which would be some hundreds of thousands of dollars more, and where would this all come from? The treasures from the tomb of King Tutankhamen, Pharaoh of Egypt, who died over 3,000 years ago, is estimated at over a billion dollars today.

(Kuokoa, 3/27/1924, p. 2)

Na lei gula o Liliu ua kudala ia

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XVII, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Maraki 27, 1924.

Woah. This is some story! Hawaiian living abroad comes home to visit… after 38 years. 1915.

THAT HAWAIIAN RETURNS TO SEE HIS HOMELAND ONCE MORE.

JOHN BELL WILSON

After leaving Honolulu thirty-eight years ago, that Hawaiian, John Bell Wilson is his name, returned to see once again his family and homeland while he was still in good health, on the steamship Matsonia this past Wednesday, filled with shock at how the places he was familiar with in his childhood had changed.

John Bell Wilson left Honolulu nei when he was a youngster of twenty-three years in age on a sailboat, because there were few steamships in his day, but it was upon a beautiful steamship that he returned to see the land of his birth and his friends, as he was shocked at the change of Honolulu from an almost nothing town which he left to a beautiful town which one admires.

His eyes met up with new sights of Honolulu and ethnicities which were unfamiliar to him; and as he travelled here and there, there were no friends who he knew in his youth, except for but a few who were still living which he met up with, those friends who he went around with in those days gone by.

Heard of the Death of His Mother

When John Bell Wilson returned to see his homeland, he had one big thing on his mind, that was meeting affectionately with his mother, who he thought was still living, but she was not, and this left him heartbroken.

Mr. Wilson was depressed at the death of his mother, being that from the time he left this land until his return, he did not write his mother; and when he asked his friends when he landed ashore about his mother, this was when he was told she had passed long ago to the other side, three years ago.

He went immediately to find the grave where his mother was laid to rest, and he planned to build a memorial to her, as a show of remembrance from a thoughtless child for his beloved mother.

Not Recognizing Honolulu

According to the words of Mr. Wilson after he saw the scenery unfamiliar to him, he could not recall the old Honolulu, because the town had changed so much from when he left, however he did have recollections of the major streets of town.

When he travelled about looking here and there, those scenes were not familiar to him, except for just a few people who went around with him and played with him in the days of his childhood. The small children he left behind were now very elderly and some of them had white hair.

Some of the familiar people who he saw on the first day he

(See page four.)

(Kuokoa, 2/5/1915, p. 1)

HULI HOI MAI IA KANAKA HAWAII E IKE HOU I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 5, 1915.

RETURNED TO THE HOMELAND

(From page one.)

stepped once again on the soil of Hawaii, were J. K. Kamanoulu and East Kahulualii who work at the newspaper printing office.

In the days of his childhood, he went often to the old Kaumakapili Church, and he was enrolled at Lahainaluna School, and according to him, C. P. Iaukea is one of his friends who is still living.

Became Wealthy in a Foreign Land

When he left the land of his birth, he got off at Sutter County, California, and there he sought very hard until he became well off.

He married his wife, and they currently have five grown children, and he provided a good home for his family. He is the one who supplies the market of Sacramento with fish and meat, and he also makes profits from the farming industry.

Kalakaua was the King of Hawaii nei at the time he last saw Hawaii, and Lorrin A. Thurston was but a child.

There are many people from Hawaii who have met up with him in California, and in the year 1891, in the town of San Francisco, he met with King Kalakaua there, and they dined together, drank and talked, and just a few days after that was when King Kalakaua died.

Did Not Forget His Mother Tongue

Mr. Wilson is now sixty-one years old, so he was living thirty-eight years abroad, and he has not forgotten his native language, he is still fluent in Hawaiian, just as the people here are.

According to him, he will spend three months staying in Hawaii before returning to his family who await him.

(Kuokoa 2/5/1915, p. 4)

HULI HOI MAI I KA AINA HANAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIII, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 5, 1915.