Two marriages, Chung Hoon/Akina & Koki/Kuaea, 1896.

Bound Together as One.

This past Thursday night, as we mentioned earlier, mauka of the residence of Rev. H. H. Parker, William H. Chung Hoon (Uilama Kanahana) and Miss Alo Akina of Kohala, Hawaii, were bound together by him (Parker). The husbandʻs neighborhood held a reception at Kauluwela, which was followed by a feast.

On that same night, after that marriage above, in the church of Kaumakapili, joined together by the Rev. H. H. Paker, was Solomona Davida Koki to Miss Esetera U. K. Kuaea. The couple arrived at 8, and it was performed immediately. There was much waiting until the church was filled with the crowd. The young girl is the organist of the church, and a student of W. Tela [W. Taylor? W. Tell?]. W. Tela played the organ while the marriage ceremony took place. There was a reception held after at the girlsʻ school of Kawaiahao, and a feast the day following at Waikahalulu. The couple boarded the Kinau of this Saturday morning to spend their first days of marriage in the land of the husband, at Waimea, Hawaii.

(Makaainana, 12/14/1896, p. 1)

Uoia a Lilo i Hookahi.

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI----Ano Hou, Helu 24, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 14, 1896.

Liliuokalani plays the first organ at Kawaiahao Church, 1867.

First Playing of the Organ of Kawaiahao Church.

At 10 in the morning of the 25th of December, the great musical instrument of Kawaiahao was played before the great crowd who gathered there to hear it being played for the first time. A great assortment of people came to hear and to see for themselves.

The Organ was played by the Princess, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia Kamakaeha Dominis, the royal leader of the Kawaiahao choir, and she was honored by her royal younger sister, Likelike, as well as the Honorable Mrs. Pauahi Bishop, who sat in the choir.

A song of gratitude was sung while the two pastors walked up to the pulpit, they being the Rev. E. Kekoa and the Kahu of the Church. The name of the hymn was “No Iehova ka Honua.”

After the singing of the hymn, nicely and fearlessly by the royal one who performed it, albeit this was the first time she played the organ before a crowd; then Rev. E. Kekoa stood and explained briefly the fulfilling of the dream of the Kawaiahao Choir, the church members, and the public, who helped with their 25¢ and their 12½¢ so that we could have this Great Instrument which is being played.

At the closing of this speech above, the Kahu of Kawaiahao stood and explained to all the birth of the King of kings, and the Lord of lords in the city of David, and expanded on things related to the birth of that Prince of Life.

At the conclusion of his speech, a hymn was given, and that alii lept into action, like she was very accustomed to it; and we are greatly appreciative for her advancement in musical instruments; and this was followed by a prayer, and then the congregation was released. The 7 foreign language speaking haole [?] gifted to Rev. H. H. Parker, $100.00 after the end of the prayer.

PRESENTING OF A GIFT.

After the congregation was let go, the Kawaiahao Choir went up to the Residence of their royal leader, to Washington Place, with a gift they wanted to present to her, a medal [?] bracelet with words engraved upon it, thusly:

“A GIFT
AN EXPRESSION OF ALOHA
BY
The Kawaiahao Choir
TO
MRS. LIDIA K. DOMINIS.”

which was [….] by W. Ka, and it was placed on the right hand of that royal one with the words below [….] by A. H[…..].

O Princess:
The Honorable
Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis.

Aloha oe:—We are your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, we show our aloha for you by presenting you with this gift of a small part of a Medal [?]; but it is not with thoughts of your servants, that their giving you this gift is something that should give you more honor, or that perhaps it will increase your already beautiful nature, but as a true expression of the things below:

One. We, your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, show our deep aloha to our Princess, and our Leader, with this small gift, as a symbol for your leaving your true Alii status [?]

Two. Your servants, the members of the Kawaiahao Choir, constantly think of your everlasting patience as you face the heavy rains of the winter, the scorching sun of the summer, the pitch dark nights of Town, and the bright moonlit nights, as you lead us in our Hymns.

And for these reasons, we ask of you, should your servants have the aloha of our Princess, the Honorable Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis, then let the Army of the wide Heavens watch over you. With aloha.

The Kawaiahao Choir.

Honolulu, Dec. 25, 1867.

—————

The Princess Replied Like This:

“I am joyful at your combined thought in gifting me with this present; it is a symbol of your true love for me.”

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1867, p. 3)

Ka Hookani mua ana o ka Ogana o ka Halepule o Kawaiahao.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 52, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 28, 1867.