The beginnings of Punahou School, 1841.

SCHOOLHOUSE FOR THE MISSIONARIES, AT KA PUNAHOU.

The rooms are explained by the numbers,

1, a library; 2, 3, 4, 5, for the teachers; 6, kitchen; 7, 8, 9, 10, for the students; 11, 12, for Mi. Mika [?] the woman helper; 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, for the students; 18, cafeteria; 19, school room; 20, room for entertaining guests; 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 for the students. A, E, wide areas to play.

This will not be completed quickly at this time; the places with solid lines are being constructed, and the areas surrounded by dashes are left to complete at a later date. The most tiny rooms are solitary rooms.

[Earlier, i posted a diagram of the layout of the Chiefs’ Children’s School. Here from about the same time is the school for missionary children at Kapunahou, the precursor to today’s Punahou School.

The school began instruction on July 11, 1842, with 5 boarders and 12 day schoolers.]

(Nonanona, 11/23/1841, p. 44)

KA HALE KULA NO NA MISIONARI, AIA MA KA PUNAHOU.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 11, Aoao 44. Novemaba 23, 1841.

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett, Kauai boy, becomes a doctor, 1914.

ANOTHER KAUAI BOY MAKES GOOD

A. H. Hanchett who is a Lihue boy, born in a house on the site of the present bowling alley, will graduate from the medical department of Harvard at the end of this month and will, on July 1, enter upon his duties as interne of a great hospital at Providence, R. I. He stood an examination, with 56 others, for that place and came out first best.

Young Hanchett’s father still lives on Kauai, at Waimea; and he is a half brother of W. O. Crowell, of Waimea. Prior to leaving the Islands, he graduated from both Kamehameha school and Oahu College. He next took a four-years course in Harvard, graduating A. B.; after which he took up the medical course, which he is now about to complete.

It is Dr. Hanchett’s hope and present intention to return to the Islands as soon as his two-year term with the Providence hospital is completed.

(Garden Island, 6/9/1914, p. 2)

ANOTHER KAUAI BOY MAKES GOOD

The Garden Island, Volume 10, Number 22, Page 2. June 9, 1914.