Mele and King Lunalilo, 1883.

ROYAL MELE.

COMPOSED BY KING LUNALILO.

1

Hawaii Ponoi,
Nana i kou Moi
Ka Lani Alii
Ke Alii
Makua Lani e
Kamehameha e
Na kaua e pale e
Me ka ihe.

2.

Hawaii Ponoi
Nana i na Alii
Na Pua a kou muli
Na pokii
Makua Lani e
Kamehameha e
Na kaua e pale e
Me ka ihe.

3.

Hawaii Ponoi
E ka Lahui
O kau hana nui
E ui e
Makua Lani e
Kamehameha e
Na kaua e pale e
Me ka ihe.

[It is interesting to note that i could not find any article in any paper protesting the attribution of this song. In the same issue is the National Anthem by Princess Liliuokalani.]

(Koo o Hawaii, 8/15/1883, p. 2)

KE MELE MOI.

Ke Koo o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Augate 15, 1883.

Follow up to Hawaiian National Hymn, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

Good Will.—We are always delighted to release to the public all kind deeds done for the benefit of the people, and therefore, we are showing at once the great kindness of the Honorable, Chief William C. Lunalilo, in his donating the ten dollars he received for composing the National song that was published in our Issue 11, to aid the Queen’s Hospital.

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Lokomaikai.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1862.

More on the Hawaiian National Hymn, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn.

William Charles Lunalilo, whose death we briefly announced in our last issue, was descended from the highest of the Royal line of Hawaiian Chiefs. His mother was Kekauluohi, known as Kaahumanu III., Kuhina Nui (Premier) under Kamehameha III., and was married to Charles Kanaina, from which marriage two sons were born Davida and William. The former died when quite young. William, soon after his mother’s death, when about eight years of age, was placed in the Royal School, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, where he received a liberal English education, and as he possessed naturally, a quick mind, he became one of the best scholars in the school. For English classical literature he had great fondness, and his familiarity with the English poets was remarkable. It was this taste that led him to indulge in writing poetry, some of which was well composed. On one occasion, twelve years ago, he called on us in our editorial sanctum and sat down at our table. In the course of the conversation, we suggested that he become a competitor for the best prize which had been offered for the best Hawaiian version of “God Save the King.” He took a pen and in fifteen or twenty minutes handed us his verses, which we enclosed in an envelope and passed with ten or twelve others to the judges, who awarded it the prize, and this is known now as the Hawaiian National Hymn “God Save the King.” We instance this to illustrate the extraordinary mental qualities with which he was endowed.—Gazette, Feb. 11.

E Ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

HAKUIA E KA MEA KIEKIE WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

1. Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai
Ko makou nei Moi,
E ola e!

2. Ka inoa kamahao
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Kou eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

3. Imua ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na Alii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ke ea e
O ke aupuni nei,
E ola mau makou,
Me ka Moi.

God Save the King.

TRANSLATED BY REV. L. LYONS.

1. Eternal, mighty God,
Bless, from thy bright abode,
Our Sovereign King;
May thy all-powerful arm
Ward from our Sire all harm,
Let no vile foe alarm,
Long may he reign!

2. Royal, distinguished name,
Our beauteous diadem,
Long life be thine;
Thy wing spread o’er our land.
From every wrong defend,
For thee our prayers ascend,
Long live our King!

3. Before thee, King of Kings,
Of whom all nature sings,
Our prayer we bring;
Oh, let our kingdom live,
Life, peace and union give,
Let all thy care receive;
Bless thou our King!

(Friend, 3/2/1874, p. 24)

Hawaiian National Hymn.

The Friend, New Series, Volume 23, Number 3, Page 24. March 2, 1874.

Hawaiian National Hymn, 1862.

E ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

Composed by WILLIAM C. LUNALILO.

Ke Akua mana mau,
Hoomaikai, pomaikai
I ka Moi!
Kou lima mana mau,
Malama, kiai mai,
Ko makou nei Moi
E ola e!

Ka inoa Kamahao,
Lei nani o makou,
E ola e!
Ko Eheu uhi mai,
Pale na ino e,
Ka makou pule nou,
E ola e!

Haliu, maliu mai,
Nana mai luna mai
Kau Pokii nei;
E mau kou ola nei,
Ke Akua kou kiai
Ka Pua nani e
Hawaii nei!

Imua Ou makou,
Ke ‘Lii o na ‘Lii,
E aloha mai;
E mau ka Ea nei
O keia Aupuni,
E ola mau lakou,
Ia oe no.

January 4, 1862.

(Kuokoa, 2/8/1862, p. 1)

E ola ka Moi i ke Akua.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 11, Aoao 1. Feberuari 8, 1862.

Beginnings of the Anglican Church in Hawaii, 1862.

Pertaining to the 28th of November¹

This day known to everyone, the day of the return of independence to the Islands and the day chosen by the Monarchs as a day for the two of them to join the new faith which has recently arrived.

On the morning of that day, at the hour of 10½, the Alii arrived at the Church and the National troops [koa o ke Aupuni], the Honolulu Rifles [koa Rifles?], the Hawaii Kiai [?], and the Cavalry [Puali Kaua Lio] were all lined up.

When the Alii arrived and passed through the entrance, the Bishop came and layed his hand and blessed them. They then entered within and sat down; following them was a procession, and they entered while chanting one of the psalms. After this was done, the laying on of hands began, and they were confirmed as brethren of the new church.

The beauty that is imbued in all creatures of the earth is what left all of their subjects who went there awe-stricken. Some wept, some fled [hoonaholoholopoo?], some were downcast, and some shuddered in awe, appearing as if the spirit from the heavens was accepted in the Monarchs joining into the circle of eternal life.

Present was Her Highness Princess V. K. Kaahumanu, the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa, the Honorable R. C. Wyllie, the Honorable Chief Justice E. H. Allen, the Honorable C. R. Bishop and his wife, the Honorable C. Kapaakea, the Honorable Colonel D. Kalakaua, Colonel McKibbin Jr., Colonel W. C. Lunalilo, Major Hasslocher, Kekaaniau, the Dowager Queen K. Hakaleleponi, Mrs. Haalelea, the wives of the Supreme Court Judges, and the Honorable Ii. There also was W. W. F. Synge and his wife, along with the Consuls of Foreign Nations.

The building was filled with those wanting to witness the joining of the Monarchs as brethren, and everyone felt much appreciation for the beauty of the Royals, the Alii, and the ceremony performed. God save the King.

¹La Kuokoa [Hawaiian Independence Day]

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 12/4/1862, p. 2)

No ka la 28 o Novemaba.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke 2, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 4, 1862.