The latest from Kalawao, 1909.

News From the Land of the Suffering.

To the Editor of the Aloha Aina Newspaper, Aloha:

Please allow my small parcel a space in your newspaper which is greatly enjoyed, and that is what is down below; let the paper take it proudly around so that our multitudes of friends may see.

Movies come regularly every Wednesday, and are shown on the evenings of Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday; and every Saturday in Honolulu. There has been a building erected for the patients to watch the movies. The patients are thrilled. They donated money to buy a first-class phonograph [pahu olelo]. They are very happy with singing, the sweet sound of the strings and the blare of the brass instruments.

There was an announcement made to the ones without the sickness or those partially afflicted that wanted to be examined by the Doctors who are coming into the settlement.

Some went to sign up, and some just looked on because they did not want to go back to where they came from, being there might be difficulties waiting ahead for them. And because of the small number of those going to sign up, the Superintendent of the settlement ordered someone to go to the houses to sign people up; the total of those people number 58, but I don’t have their names; the only names I have are those who went to sign up, and they number 55, along with their doctor.

THE PEOPLE WHOSE DOCTOR IS DR. WAYSON

[Names difficult to make out.]

THE PEOPLE WHOSE DOCTOR IS DR. GOODHUE.

The Men

[Names difficult to make out.]

The Women

[Names difficult to make out.]

The total number told to the writer is 108. This includes the people chosen by the Legislature [?]

With much aloha for my Lahui.

Sincerely,

S. K. MAIALOHA.

Kalawao, Molokai, Aug. 2, 1909

[Here is just another example of why the original newspapers need to be reshot clearly before the acid in the paper consumes all of the words, leaving us with crumbs…]

(Aloha Aina, 9/4/1909, p. 3)

Na Mea Hou o ke Kahua Ma'i.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XIV, Helu 36, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 4, 1909.

Kalaupapa a hundred years ago, 1912.

NEWS FROM KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI.

The S. S. Mikahala arrived yesterday, and turned around full of cargo for this port, and at Kaunakakai it put ashore the pai ai [pa‘i ‘ai], and most of the items will perhaps arrive the following week. The kokua went upside to Kaunakakai with the donkeys to fetch the pai ai yesterday evening, and last night the provision donkeys arrived, and this morning they left again for the remaining pai ai. The reason that that S. S. Mikahala could not land her cargo was because of the rough seas surrounding us; there was no harbor, only ocean, and the waves spreading across shore were towering, but an amazing thing was the request by the Vice Superintendent and Doctor W. J. Goodhue for the children and their skiff of the H. H. K. L. [?] and this request was granted.

Dr. W. J. Goodhue got on, along with the stout boys of the H. H. K. L. and they rowed out to try and get the Mikahala to throw over the pai ai to them; the amazing thing I spoke of was when the skiff came into view and before them was a huge wave, and that was when everyone held their breath, because it was as if the boat and the brave ones aboard would be pulled down, however with the blink of an eye, the skiff arrived triumphantly outside without harm, and Dr. W. J. Goodhue was seen waving his handkerchief to the people on land. And to Mr. Paahao, the helmsman went the people’s appreciation, because it was his steering that they faced the powerful waves and came out like a man-eating shark speeding atop the sparkling [hulala?] billows of the sea; and admiration also went to the boys who rowed, being that it was their strength which helped the helmsman greatly. This is just some news.

I understand that you sent the Calendars and they came, but there they go back again, and maybe we will get them next week.

There is a much Rain and strong Kona winds blowing, from last week until today, and it is this wind that caused the rough seas, and the rough seas are bringing up great rocks [aa?] and depositing them upland.

William Notley
Kalaupapa, Molokai, Feb. 2, 1912.

(Kuokoa Home Rula, 2/9/1912, p. 1)

NA MEA HOU O KALAUPAPA MOLOKAI.

Kuokoa Home Rula, Buke X, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 9, 1912.