More on mele, 1860.

Through mele, one can understand the way of life of the people of very long ago, and the stories of the land as well!

Don’t forget to answer this short survey from the Bishop Museum Library and Archives. And if you are in a language class, in a hula class, in a history class. Why do you look at mele? Why don’t you look at mele? Send this survey around.

[Click the link below:]

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdL2lT4hbMOyYOk0NwYtGPeIgOHj5k6ShE1N8Ub9EmrnzRWqA/viewform?usp=sf_link

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Pertaining to Mele

Perhaps the mele of old are almost all lost; those who know them are but few. This is something to be regretful of for in those mele, one can understand the way of life of the people of very long ago, and the stories of the land as well. The means for these mele to continue and not to be lost is by printing them in books and newspapers perhaps; in that way, the new generations can read them and contemplate over it and see the misconceptions of their kupuna and to not follow in their misguided ways. We wish to print the old mele and new mele, as long as they are good, and we ask of those who have mele and the composers of mele to send them to us and we will print them. Write the letters very clearly, and insert punctuation where they…

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