About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

Hawaii news from 1837.

From the Sandwich Islands.—We have received a file of the Sandwich Island Gazette to March 11. The Gazette contains a recommendation to the inhabitants of the island to erect a monument to the memory of Captain Cook, at Hawaii, on the spot on which he was killed. The Gazette of Feb. 25, announces the marriage, by Mr. Bingham of Kauikeauli [Kauikeaouli], King of the Sandwich Islands, to Kalama, daughter of Naihekukui. Continue reading

The passing of Queen Hazaleleponi Kalama Kapakuhaili, 1870.

Death of the Alii, the Dowager Queen Hakaleleponi,* Kalama, Kapakuhaili.

The responsibility has fallen upon us to carry the bundle of grief, sadness, and woe, and with regret, we report to you of the death of the Alii, the Dowager Queen Hakaleleponi, Kalama, Kapakuhaili, at 11:02 on the past 20th of Sept., at her residence at Haimoeipo, Honolulu. Continue reading

News of Kapoina Dandridge heading back to Hawaii, 1900.

FORTUNE

For Colored Woman.

Will Go to Sandwich Islands.

Disappearance of a Barberton Man. [unrelated story]

(Special Correspondence.)

Barberton, Oct. 5.—Mrs. Smith Dandridge, an estimable colored lady, who formerly resided here, until a year ago, and also in Akron, has gone to the Sandwich Islands to obtain a fortune, which has been willed to her. Continue reading

Francis Hyde Ii Brown (lengthy) political ad, 1926.

Francis H. Ii Brown

(Ii of Kahalelaukoa)

A Republican

SENATORIAL

Candidate

Give Your Ballot for Him

“A True Descendant of Yours, O Hawaii”

Make Him Your Servant

IT IS RIGHT TO SUPPORT HIM AND TO ELECT FRANCIS II BROWN AND THAT HE BECOME A SENATOR FOR THE ISLAND OF OAHU.

The great question that the voter will give his thought to before giving his support and vote, that is understanding and knowing first what is right; and when knowing what is right, then the support and votes will be gotten, but if it is known and understood that it is not right, then the person running for a position will lack support and votes. This is a long-standing lesson and it is something that is well fixed, something that one cannot avoid; some people have reasons why they give their support to some candidates running for some positions, while the thoughts of some voters wander about looking to arrive at a place of all the truths, and who is most appropriate to give their support and vote to so that they are voted into the various posts they are after. Continue reading

Passing of Margaret Kapoina Dandridge, 1926.

Following an illness, Mrs. Maggie Kapoina Dandridge, the mother of Mrs. J. K. Mokumaia, grew weary of this life in the morning of this past Tuesday at the age of 77.

(Kuokoa, 10/28/1926, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXV, Helu 43, Aoao 5. Okatoba 28, 1926.

Death of a different George Makalena, 1878.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

Death of G. C. McLean.—This past Tuesday, Keoki Makalena [George McLean], a haole very familiar to there people here in Honolulu, died; and he was the one who owns the Shop called, “Ka Halekuai Bolabola.”*

[Oftentimes foreign people were given Hawaiianized names like Makalena for McLean, Wilikina for Wilson, or Poe for Boyd. I have started tracking some of these names, because I think it would be helpful when doing research in Hawaiian language documents. See the list by clicking here.]

*George Christie McLean was also known to Hawaiians as Bolabola. His store seems to have been known in English as George C. McLean’s Store.

(Kuokoa, 12/14/1878, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVII, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 14, 1878.

George Makalena and others with the Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show want to come home, 1899.

Hawaiian Rough Riders

Four of the Hawaiians who were with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show are at San Francisco rooming in a big building opposite the Occidental on Montgomery. The boys, who hope to get off for home by Manoa, are: K. Nakea, Hoapili, Kipi and Makalena. Continue reading