About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

Octopus dead because of flood, 1915.

[Found under: “KELA AME KEIA”]

Because of there being so much water in the Wailua River, and this water running down here into Hilo Bay, there are a lot of octopus Continue reading

Huli Kalo of all varieties! 1913.

Taro Tops! Taro Tops!!

You can obtain Huli Kao of all varieties at the Hilo Boarding School. $2.50 for a thousand.

Inquire of the Principal of the Hilo Boarding School [Kula Hanai o Hilo].

Levi C. Lyman [L. C. Laimana]
Principal.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/2/1913, p. 3)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 31, Aoao 3. Ianuari 2, 1913.

I was asked once if other ethnicities put ads in Hawaiian language newspapers…

…I think if you wanted to sell your products, yes, you did.

 

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 39, Aoao 2. Feberuari 27, 1913.
The Hawaii Shokumin Shinbun, Number 484, September 6, 1912.
Hawaii Herald, Volume XVII, Number 22, Page 4. January 17, 1913.

On the first horses in Hawaii nei, 1852.

Who Brought the First Horses to the Islands?—In a valuable document presented by Stephen Reynolds, Esq., to the R. H. A. Society at its first meeting in 1850, the following passage occurs:—Horses.—I have not been able to find the name of him who introduced the first. It appears two were brought and presented to Kamehameha; the natives say Mr. Manine was in the vessel. Several were brought before 1823. From 1824 to 1838 many cargoes were brought from California. The horses born and reared on the islands are superior in all respects to those imported from California,—better limbs, better spirits, and tougher animals.” Continue reading

Animals introduced in Ka Lama Hawaii, 1834.

Pertaining to the Sloth [Hiamoe].

This strange animal is born and lives and dies amongst the branches of the trees. They are rare, and live in seclusion in the trees of the deep forests of South America. That is where it lives. Its front legs are long, somewhat like those of the arms of man, it does not reach a foot, its claws are long like fingers. Its hind legs are short. Therefore it cannot walk on land, it can only move by crawling. From that comes its name, the Sloth. Continue reading

Rev. William Kamau, oldest minister in the Hawaiian church, 1940.

[Found under “Aloha Pumehana”]

REV. WILLIAM KAMAU

He is the oldest amongst the ministers of Hawaii’s Churches.

The Haili Church gives its warm aloha to you, oh good father, and so too with Ka Hoku o Hawaii.

[Rev. William Kamau was one of the contributors to Bishop Museum’s Roberts Collection of mele. See this week’s He Aupuni Palapala blog for more information on a new exhibit about the collection and an better image of William Kamau!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/19/1940, p. 1)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 8, Aoao 1. Iune 19, 1940.