About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

New firebrand hill, Nanaau, 1868.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Kauai.”]

New Firebrand Hill.—W. D. Kaipoleimanu of Hanamaulu writes to proclaim his witnessing of the hurling of firebrands atop a new tall hill named Nanaau. Continue reading

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English newspaper coverage of Lucy Ward car accident, 1912.

CAR CASUALTIES.

While Miss Lucy Ward was driving an automobile, containing besides herself Miss Kulamanu Ward, Miss Mabel Phillips and Curtis W. Hustace, out of the Old Plantation gateway on Friday evening, Continue reading

The moon was painted red by God, 1870.

Go look outside tonight, the moon is painted red once again!

nupepa

From Kauai.

Pertaining to the lunar eclipse. On the 17th of January, at 2:25 and 35 seconds in the morning, one body affected another body in the heavens, and its color turned strange, and we adults and children here in Lihue witnessed it; and here is my bit of humor, someone said: “The moon has been eaten by God.” And another said, “The moon was painted red with red paint by God.” And there was a lot of new things spoken of on that  night, but I cannot carry on about that.

[This article and another was written under the heading “From Kauai,” by S. K. Kahookalaopio of Lihue, Kauai, on January 19, 1870.]

(Kuokoa, 1/29/1870, p. 4)

Mai Kauai mai. Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IX, Helu 5, Aoao 4. Ianuari 29, 1870.

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Good roads down in Ewa, 1869.

The road of Ewa—There are perhaps no other people in the backside of town who are greatly blessed with good roads to travel upon like those who live in the Ewa side and all the way leeward. Leaving town, it is truly a pleasant ride by horse or carriage; the windiness of Moanalua, the descent of Kapukaki, Kalauao, and the rise on that side, and the descent of Waimalu; it is just fine; there are no obstructing boulders that block or hold up the trip. There is great confidence in the efficiency of our Road Supervisor [Luna Alanui], and we hope that the days will not be far away when the roads all over the island will progress as well.

[This is the first time I have come across “maikakaʻi,” which I am guessing is a reduplication of maikaʻi. Any other thoughts?]

(Au Okoa, 1/21/1869, p. 2)

AuOkoa_1_21_1869_2.png

Ke Au Okoa, Buke IV, Helu 40, Aoao 2. Ianuari 21, 1869.