About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

Death of David Kailihiwa, 1922.

DAVID KAILIHIWA

David Kailihiwa of 1017 Kawaiahao street died at his home at 3:15 o’clock last Tuesday, pneumonia being the cause of death. Services will be held next Sunday afternoon at Silva’s mortuary chapel, Kukui, near Nuuanu street, interment to be in the South King street Catholic cemetery.* Kailihiwa, who was a municipal employe in the garbage department, was married, and was born on March 3, 1861, in South Kona, Hawaii, being 61 years, 9 months and 23 days old at the time of his death. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Sarah Akau Kailihiwa.

*It is interesting that this cemetery is no longer known by its old name, Koula Cemetery [Pa Ilina o Koula].

[A Hawaiian announcement was posted earlier. It included an image of David Kailihiwa. See the post by clicking this link.]

(Advertiser, 12/28/1922, p. 7)

Honolulu Advertiser, 64th Year, Number 12,508, Page 7. December 28, 1922.

Death of Mrs. Sarah Kawehiwehi Kailihiwa, 1924.

ONE YEAR REMEMBRANCE OF MY DEAR MOTHER.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Solomon Hanohano; Greetings:—I ask for your graciousness and your benevolence, to insert my thoughts in one of the columns of the favorite of the lahui, pertaining to the one year remembrance of my dear mother who has passed on, Mrs. Sarah Kawehiwehi Kailihiwa. Continue reading

Medical school for young Hawaiians, 1870.

Kahunas.

We understand that one of our physicians, who is thoroughly conversant with the native language, has been authorized to form a class of eight or ten Hawaiian young men, (graduates of the highest schools,) for instruction in the principles and practice of medicine.

There has never been made, that we are aware of, any systematic or earnest effort to instruct Hawaiian youth in the medical art. The knowledge that is necessary to be acquired to make a skillful and thoroughly competent practitioner is not to be obtained in this country, which as yet, does not possess medical schools and colleges, and the difficulties in the way of sending Hawaiian pupils abroad to obtain a medical education, are so various and insurmountable, as almost to preclude any hope of being overcome. Continue reading

Medical school for Hawaiians, 1870.

Medical School.—In the English government newspaper of Wednesday last week, we saw an editorial pertaining to the building of a medical school for young Hawaiians, for maybe eight or ten of them. After inquiring, we were told that Dr. G. P. Judd was given the authority to establish this kind of fine school Continue reading

Death of Clarence William Kinney, 1942.

Isle Composer Dies; Aged 63

Clarence W. Kinney Victim of Heart Attack

Clarence W. Kinney, 63, died of a heart attack at the home of his son, Clarence P. Kinney, 1133 First Avenue, late Saturday afternoon. The body will be on view at the Borthwick Mortuary after 9 a. m. Monday. Funeral services will be conducted by William Waddoups of the Latter Day Saints at 2:30 o’clock, burial in Diamond Head cemetery. Continue reading

Names of Maori visitors, 1920.

MEMBERS OF PARTY OF VISITING MAORIS

Wiremu “William” Duncan and wife of Dannevirke, New Zealand. He will go with President Lambert to Salt Lake City shortly. He is a manufacturer of cheese and his product took first prize in London in competition with the world.

Eriata Nopera and wife of Dannevirke, New Zealand, a wealthy sheep owner. Continue reading

Clarence W. Kinney reports on the visit of the Maori entourage, 1920.

MAORI WHO CAME TO HAWAII.

On the morning of the 16th of May, fourteen Maori arrived, six men and eight women, aboard the ship the Niagara, from New Zealand. After the examination by customs, they were taken to the mission house of the Church of the Latter-Day Saints at Auwaiolimu.

When they entered the church, the eyes were fixed of everyone who gathered, and the crowd was filled with happiness and aloha. Continue reading