About nupepa

Just another place that posts random articles from the Hawaiian Newspapers! It would be awesome if this should become a space where open discussions happen on all topics written about in those papers!! And please note that these are definitely not polished translations, but are just drafts!!! [This blog is not affiliated with any organization and receives no funding. Statements made here should in now way be seen as a reflection on other organizations or people. All errors in interpretation are my own.]

It is almost Mothers’ Day, and I just came across this article, so…, 1863.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Prizing the Lahui.—We have heard that the Honorable R. C. Wyllie is considering presenting medals to some women living on his lands at Hanalei; the reason for him doing so is because of the great number of children these women gave birth to, that being 15 children of one, and the same for the other; and a majority of the children survive. Continue reading

On the name Kamehameha, 1838.

I just ran across this article yesterday [again], and was just as excited about it as the first time… 2021

nupepa

KAMEHAMEHA.

That is the name of the Alii nui of Hawaii nei. This name is known to the native people, but the spelling by the haole is confused; in their letters, this and that one’s spelling is strange. Here are what ten haole have written, each are different. All of them are old-timers. They are taken from haole documents.

1. Tameamea

2. MaihaMaiha

3. Cameamea

4. Comaamaa

5. Tomyhomyhaw

6. Tamaahmaah

7. Hameamea

8. Tomooma

9. Tamahama

10. Tamehameha

(Kumu Hawaii, 9/12/1838, p. 31.)

KAMEHAMEHA. Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 4, Pepa 8, Aoao 31. Sepatemaba 12, 1838.

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A mele for Kalanianaole on this holiday proclaimed in his honor, 1910.

HE MELE NO KALANIANAOLE.

He inoa nou e Kalanianaole,
Ka hoku hele o ka Pakipika.
Ua like no oe me ka uwila,
Ke telegarapa ha’i manao.
Akaka ka Elele ike e ka po,
Ua ike ka lani me ka honua.
Ua na’i oe apuni na moku,
I pono nou hoa makaainana. Continue reading

On William Shakespeare, 1867.

[Found under: “NUHOU KULOKO: Honolulu.”]

Praise for Uilama Hoonaueueihe.—We saw in the English Government paper praise of the translation of the stories from English to Hawaiian of the man whose name is above. It is our desire to have our readers enjoy fine and proper moolelo. Continue reading

Victoria Hose marries John N. Keola, 1918.

[Found under: “MARRIED.”]

KEOLA-HOSE—In Laie, Oahu, August 31, 1918, John N. Keola and Miss Victoria Hose. Elder William K. Apua of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, officiating; witnesses—Enoka Waa and Mrs. Enoka Waa.

(Star-Bulletin, 9/10/1918, p. 6)

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXVI, Number 8239, Page 6. September 10, 1918.

Victoria Keola’s obituary from the Star-Bulletin, 1921.

OBITUARY

MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA

Funeral services for Mrs. Victoria Keola, wife of John N. Keola, 318 Iolani St., who died at 11 o’clock Sunday evening following an operation for appendicitis, were held yesterday, interment being in Nuuanu cemetery. Mrs. Keola was a native of Kona, Hawaii, and was 31 years old. She is survived by a widower and four children. Continue reading

Death of Victoria Keola, 1921.

OUR BELOVED DAUGHTER, MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA HAS PASSED ON.

MRS. VICTORIA KEOLA.

Mr. Editor of the Kuokoa Newspapers, Aloha oe:—Please may we ask you to be patient and give us an open space of the Kuokoa for our parcel, and the paper will carry it upon the billows of the ocean until it reaches land, so that the family and friends of the beloved daughter of ours will see, whereas we, her parents were living at ease without dreaming of this ahead of time. On Monday, Jan. 17, while her father was getting ready to get on this horse to go into the mountains to perform his usual duties of seeking out steer, his female employer called out, “E Paahana, there was a wireless telegram from Honolulu saying Mrs. Victoria Keola is dead. That was a time for sadness and grief. From there, her father turned back for home and told the sad news to the family, there was a telegram telling of Victoria’s death. He got on the Kilauea of Monday, Jan. 17, with the great desire to see her remains, but no, her body was gone on the 17th while her papa was sailing on the sea. When he reached Honolulu, he got on a car and travelled straight for the house of his children [? daughter]; he saw his son-in-law and his grandchildren, but his beloved daughter, Mrs. Victoria Keola, he did not see, and his tears of love flowed and he went up to Maemae and saw the grave of our beloved, and his tears flowed; aloha for his daughter who went afar! Continue reading

A kingdom of literacy, 1869.

Hear this.

May our newspaper readers of this past year see this; while we are busy fulfilling your subscriptions for the time, if you do not receive this year’s newspapers in some of your districts, do not be puzzled, but think first about not paying for the year being the reason newspapers have not been sent, however if you are prepared to pay your debts of the past and for this current year, then newspapers will be handed over with no delay as you per your wishes. Continue reading

O Ku! O Ka! O Ku! O Ka!

Patience Bacon standing in front of Hawaiian Hall at the 7th Annual Bernice Pauahi Bishop Awards Dinner, where she was presented with the Robert J. Pfeiffer Medal. July 23, 2005. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 215864.
He Hoʻālohaloha no Patience Elmay Namakauahoaokawenaulaokalaniikiikikalaninui Wiggin Bacon.

An expression of aloha for our dear Aunty Pat who left on the path of no return on January 23, 2021, at the age of 100. Within her lived the legacies of those committed to preserving the invaluable knowledge of the past. Her own dedication to this noble calling came with a life devoted to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, hula, mele, and cultural knowledge…

[Continuation of the words of aloha for Aunty Pat put forth by Bishop Museum today can be found by clicking here.]

Will Rogers and Hawaiian independence, 1932.

ROGERS SAYS LET HAWAII ISLES ALONE

(Special Star-Bulletin Wireless)

SANTA MONICA, Cal., May 2.—Well, about all you can see in the papers is Honolulu. The whole thing just proves that the islands haven’t got any use for the navy and the mainland.

Of course, I guess I am all wet, but I never have seen any reason why the U. S. or any nation should hold under subjection of any kind any islands or country outside of our own. Continue reading