The death of Kaoleioku Pauli, 1874.

O PAULI, ALOHA

This past Tuesday, the 30th of December, at 7 o’clock in the evening, Kaoleioku Pauli left this earthly body and silently went on to the hidden pathway of Kanaloa; to return to the slumber of Niolopua, the eternal rest.

He was a man who was often seen in the royal courts of Hawaii nei, and he was a chief born of the land as shown in the genealogy chart below:

Keawe (m) dwelt with Lonomaaikanaka (f), begot was Kalaninuiiamamao (m); Kalaninuiiamamao (m) dwelt with Kamakaimoku, begot was Kalaniopuu (m); Kalaniopuu (m) dwelt with Ahia (f), begot was Kekuehoa (f); Kekuehoa dwelt with Kamahinakauloa (m), begot was Kaiakuilani (f); Kaiakauilani dwelt with Puumahiole (m), begot was Haumea (m); Haumea dwelt with Paaluhi (f), begot was Pauli; and he married Wakeki, but they have no offsrping. But it is sad that it was revealed that his wife is now pregnant with child, and perhaps the blood of Pauli will be begotten anew, and the name Kaoleioku Pauli will be given.

Pauli was born at Keauhou, in North Kona, Hawaii, on the 22nd of November 1836, and therefore he reached 37 years old and 1 month and 7 days.

He began playing the band during the time it was lead by William Merseburgh [?? Uilama Olelo-e], and he was the only student left from the band of the Kings, from Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III to Lunalilo, and while in that occupation, he fell. He was a man that was skilled at singing, and he was the greatest of Hawaiians in his deep knowledge of singing; and he greatly assisted in leading the choir of Kawaiahao; and he was always seen in front of song concerts with the alii Pauahi and Kamakaeha.

He was assigned by the Board of Education as a singing teacher for the government school for the district of Kona, Honolulu, and while in that position he let go of his burdens.

Pau ka lohe ana i kana ohe,
Ke kani kapalili mai i Iolani,
Pau ka lohe’a ana o kona leo,
Ma na paia eehia o Kawaiahao,
E na keiki kula, ua hele ke kumu,
Ua hele ka makua nana e ao mai,
Ma na anuu leo o na leo mele,
E Pauli e, aloha, aloha pau ole!
Imia ou mau kupuna alii,
Aia ia i ka lewanuu i ka lewa lani,
Aia ma ke ala polikua a Kane,
Imiia a loaa ou mau kini,
I hookahi ka noho’na i ka hale anuanu.

[No more will we hear wind instrument,
Its trilling song from Iolani,
No more will his voice be heard,
In the solemn walls of Kawaiahao,
O Schoolchildren, your teacher has gone,
Went is the father who taught,
The intervals in singing,
O Pauli, aloha, our never-ending aloha!
Seek out your chiefly ancestors,
They are in the sky up above, the sky in the heaven,
On the dark path of Kane,
Search out and find your relatives,
You will live as one in the cold house.

This is not the Pauli Kaoleioku who was the son of Kamehameha I and Kanekapolei.]

(Nuhou, 1/6/1874, p. 6)

Nuhou_1_6_1874_6

Ka Nuhou Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Ianuari 6, 1874.

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Funeral of Lucy Lusia Lulea Kaiamoku Muolo Moehonua, 1865.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Funeral Performed.—Shortly after half past 3 o’clock, the funeral procession of Mrs. Lucy L. K. Moehonua began from their home until Kawaiahao Church, in the evening of the Sabbath, the 15th of this October. A short eulogy was read by the Rev. H. H. Parker [H. H. Pareka], and after that, the Rev. M. Kuaea rose and spoke on the passage 1 Thessalonians 4:18. It was not long after he was done speaking when the congregation was soon let out and the remains of Mrs. Lucy L. K. Moehonua were taken to be placed in her crypt, Hoakalei.

This crypt [hale kupapau] is the best in the cemetery of Kawaiahao, and in all of the nation of Hawaii nei. It is an unusual sight; it has four gables [kala] fashioned in the form of a cross; one gable faces the rising sun, one to the west, and the others to the north and south. And the cost for the building was nearly $800.00.

(Kuokoa, 10/21/1865, p. 2)

Ua Hoolewaia.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke IV, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 21, 1865.

More on the commemorative tablets, but from the pen of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani himself, 1907.

COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE AT KAWAIAHAO

Memorial Tablets to the Alii of the Land are Unveiled.

This past Sunday the Kawaiahao Church was filled to listen to the commemorative program for John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea, and Ululani; the people whose names are inscribed on the marble tablets placed in the church.

On the wall mauka at the pulpit of the pastor is where the marble tablet of John Ii is placed, and mauka of the central door to enter into the chapel [keena pule] is where the tablet of the last three names.

The Kaahumanu Society came in great numbers on this day, and one side of the church was filled with them, and there were many visitors who came to witness the events held on that day.

It was Rev. H. H. Parker who introduced the two that gave the speeches about the history of those who were being memorialized on that day, they being Rev. S. L. Desha and the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani.

Rev. S. L. Desha’s speech relied heavily upon his introductory words that morning about the woman who anointed the feet of Jesus, and just as the words of the Lord speaks of the actions of that woman becoming something remembered, in that same way Desha presented things about John Ii.

He spoke of the story of this man from his childhood, and he was one of the intelligent ones who gave great assistance in guiding the nation forward.

When the missionary teachers urged the King to educate him, he chose John Ii to be educated along with the younger brother of the King; this showed the King had much trust in this man.

In the administration of the nation, John Ii was the first amongst the Hawaiians who the King chose for an important post. When a commissioner was being chosen to give lands to the people, he was one who was selected, and he rose to the position of judge on the Supreme Court.

When the King received instruction from San Francisco to send someone from Hawaii to sit in the jury of that city pertaining to the crime committed by a Hawaiian [Harry Kaheleiki], it was indeed John Ii who the king chose to send to hear this case, and this man’s abilities and intelligence was seen through his actions.

In his attitude towards religion, he was a man who always stuck to what was right, and he gave sermons at the Church of Ewa. It is said that if it was heard that he was the one to be speaking, the church would be filled, and people stood outside, and on one Sunday when he went to go pray, when he was headed home, he fell from his horse and broke a rib, and that was his ailment which persisted until his death.

It is said in the history of this man, he was a man of strength, and the Alii were of great importance to him. As a result of an accident involving one of the Alii, that being the Alii falling from a horse, he did not wait to find out the cause of this distress to the Alii, but his outrage was focused upon the horse, and in his anger, with but one punch he struck the horse and it died.

After the words about John Ii was done, the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani stood and read the story of the second part of the events of that day, and we are printing what he presented for them, just as he read, and here it is below:

Whereas:—The second portion of the events of this day is the dedication of the commemorative tablet for Ululani and Haalelea which is affixed to the wall in front of this church.

This gift was not on account of just one person, but it is a present from the people. It is the members, intimates, and friends of the Kawaiahao Church showing the family of the ones who died their aloha and their never-ending remembrance of Ululani Haalelea.

The reason and the cause that this endeavor was carried out by the members and it was decided to place it here in this church of Kawaiahao:

Whereas, Ululani did a great deed for this church and its members, over a long period of time, during her lifetime, and she was a brethren of this Church.

With the auspices of the Church, along with this commemorative speech, will be attached the history of her life, her birth, her fine works, and the list of names of the intimates and friends who were involved, and will be gifted to the family of Ululani Haalelea here in Honolulu and in other places.

(See page 8.)

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 1)

ANAINA HOOMANAO MA KAWAIAHAO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 1. Okatoba 18, 1907.

COMMEMORATIVE SERVICE AT KAWAIAHAO.

(From page 1.)

Ululani was born in they year 1842, in the month of July on the 21st, at Hilo, Hawaii. Sixteen years later, in the month of June, she was married to the alii, Levi Haalelea.

They lived in the holy covenant of matrimony until 1864, when Haalelea died; therefore, she only lived with her husband for six years, and they had not children.

In that very year, and a just before that time, Henry H. Parker came from his position as teacher at Lahainaluna College.

He was to serve as kahu of Kawaiahao Church, and it was then Ululani Haalelea was included into the church by this Henry H. Parker; she was the first fruit for righteousness in her confession of faith [hoike manaoio], and she became a member of the Kawaiahao Church.

And from then on she remained a member of the Church until her recent death in 1904; she was a member for 40 years, in her 62 years of life.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a chiefess who was steadfast in the righteousness of God. She was humble with aloha. She was pleasant and benevolent, she was a mother for the Christian good in Hawaii, she was a famous chiefess and prominent among the Courts of the Monarchs, and the high chiefs of the land, she was an attendant of Queens, and held honored positions in the courts of those days.

Mrs. Ululani Haalelea was a leader and an adviser of the Beneficent association of this town, from the Beneficent Associations of the haole, to the haole women and to the Hawaiians; she was the vice president of the Ahahui Hoola Lahui of Kalakaua and Kapiolani, she was a distinguished member of the board of trustees of the Maternity Home, and a president of the Choir “Hawaii Noeau.”

In 1893, a difficult situation fell upon the membership of Kawaiahao, that being the Kahu realized the state of the church at that time; it was old and the wood all over the building was rotting.

He fetched carpenters and they came and looked; they said that shortly services could not be held in the near future; it was just a matter of time before it fell.

Therefore, that very year, the doors of the church were shut. And the meetings of the members were held in a coconut front lanai upon this grounds.

Looking on, there was nothing left to do; the members ordered the building be torn down from top to bottom, leaving only the stone walls.

There were two big problems at the time. 1. The poor and needy state of the Church; there was no money to reestablish and rebuild the church. 2. the overthrowing of the Monarchy of Hawaii that year. The thoughts of the Hawaiians and the haole were cleaved in two, the unity was broken, and aloha was broken into bits, and feelings of rage and anger grew. The church members were split in two with one group being patriots while the other group being for annexation.

Because of these problems, there grew many doubts and predictions of disaster. Kawaiahao would not be built anew for the land and the people were in turmoil. But Ululani Haalelea had no doubt, she stood up and holding a plow in her hand, in righteousness, and she set up the very first money-making event to rebuild Kawaiahao Church, among the many words of doom from the haole and Hawaiians alike.

Six months later, in December 1893, a great Fair [Aha Fea] was held in the uplands of Manamana, under the direction of Ululani assisted by Mrs. Annie Dowsett and the mothers of Kawaiahao, and the effort went smoothly.

Subtracting the expenses from the profits, what was left was $2000 in the funds to build the church.

At the same time, the members took action by figuring out on paper their donations. Some put $20, some $10, some $5, some $1.00, and so forth, and in the month of April of 1894, in the coconut frond lanai, the members gave their donations which totaled to $890 in cash, and $400 on paper.

When the wealthy haole amongst us living in Hawaii nei as well as in foreign lands saw that the members of Kawaiahao were taking action at the urging of Ululani Haalelea, they said, [“]We will now give you aid, O Kawaiahao, for we see that you are working and putting in great effort.[“]

Therefore, from Britain, from Theo. Davies, came $1000; from his wife $500; from C. R. Bishop $1000; and some others.

In that same year, the members chose a committee for the building of the church: The Kahu, Chairman; Ululani Haalelea, E. K. Lilikalani, D. L. Naone, Mary Adams, W. R. Castle, and P. C. Jones was the treasurer for the funds to build the church.

In the closing months of 1894, the church was completed, and the members entered after nine months of holding services in the Coconut frond  hut [hale papa’i Launiu]. The church was complete with the total expenses being $14,000. In the famous history of this church, it was King Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III who first set up the building of this church in the year 1839, and it was complete in 1843 and consecrated to Jehovah. Its head was Rev. Hiram Bingham [Rev. Hiram Binamu].

In 1892, the Jubilee of the old Kawaiahao was held. And it was torn down in 1893. Therefore the old Kawaiahao stood for 51 years before it was razed.

And in the reconstruction of the New Kawaiahao, Ululani Haalelea was the one with a steel heart of aloha in the works for the Lord who inspired the brethren, [“]Let’s rebuild the Church.[“] And this is what we see now, that it is better than the previous Kawaiahao. And Rev. H. H. Parker is the Kahu, the leader; therefore I say that Ululani Haalelea is a Chiefess who is ranked in the List of famous chiefesses of the land.

    1. Her Highness Victoria Kamamalu, was the one to establish the first Kaahumanu Society of women here in the town of Honolulu in 1864, just as you all on this day, and she was extremely intelligent and famous for her knowledge in singing and musical instruments.
    2. Queen Ema Kaleleonalani, was the one who established the Queen’s Hospital which is called by her name, a place of refuge for their [Queen Emma and Kamehameha IV] citizens in times of trouble.
    3. Her Highness, Princess Pauahi Bishop, dedicated all of her wealth for the Kamehameha Schools. A blessing for the generations of youth of her lahui.
    4. Queen Kapiolani was the one who established the Kapiolani Maternity Hospital called by her name, the place of rest for Hawaiian women for their periods of difficulty.
    5. And the Chiefess Ululani Haalelea, the second cornerstone, the one who lead her fellow laborers of good, [“]Let’s rebuild the Kawaiahao Church,[“] by establishing the first Fair [Fea], and the proceeds from it was dedicated to the funds for the construction of the church, and this was carried out, and it was built, and the Building was completed in time and paid off with no debt.

And we all are witnesses who see firsthand the famous works of these chiefesses. Those words of the Lord Jesus Christ about that woman who anointed him in oil were fulfilled: Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her.

In that way we are remembering Ululani, with this stone monument for her, for Haalelea, her own husband, and for Haalilio; along with the monument to the Hanai Parent of the chiefs, Ioane Ii, the great Judge of the Supreme Court during the reign of Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III,  a member of the National Boundary Commission, a member of the House of Nobles, and a native born chief. It was for all of them that the speeches of commemoration on this day were given, people who give pride to this land.

E. K. LILIKALANI.

[It is interesting to compare this account by E. K. Lilikalani with the account presented earlier in the PCA on 10/14/1907.]

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1907, p. 8)

HE ANAINA HOOMANAO MA KAWAIAHAO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLII, Helu 42, Aoao 8. Okatoba 18, 1907.

Restoration Day celebration, day number 2! 1844.

SECOND DAY OF THE FESTIVAL, AUGUST 1ST.

Thursday morning, Aug. 1st, at 10 o’clock A. M.—a procession was formed of all the juvenile members of temperance societies to the number of one thousand eight hundred of all ages and both sexes. They were well dressed, and divided into companies bearing appropriate banners, marching in couples to the fort, where they were joined by Their Majesties, the King and Queen, Her Royal Highness the Premier, and the chief nobles and officers of the court and kingdom. Attended by the military, they marched to the stone church, which was crowded to excess, inside and out; doors, windows and every available space being occupied by the eager multitude; and a more pleasing sight than so many happy children, (with their gratified parents) zealous in the noble cause of temperance, and sustained both by the precept and example of the highest magnates of their country, was never witnessed at these Islands. The King and Premier both addressed the audience, and their remarks were received with fixed attention. It was remarked that his Majesty spoke with much spirit and feeling and with a very happy…

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 46)

SECOND DAY OF THE FESTIVAL, AUGUST 1ST.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1.—Number 12, Page 46. August 10, 1844.

…effect. Mr. Ii, of his Majesty’s Privy Council, then spoke, and commanded the attention of all present by his grace and eloquence. Mr. Ii is an orator by nature, and to native vigor of expression, adds the charm of polished and commanding action. We are sure, that none who understood the Hawaiian language, could fail of deriving great pleasure and profit from his remarks; and those who were unacquainted with it, scarcely less of the former from his peculiarly impressive manner. The address referred to the great and glorious change brought about by the adherence to the tee-total principle by the chiefs and people generally, and the striking contrast between the former periods of wild mis-rule and intemperance, and the bright days of order and prosperity that are now dawning upon the kingdom. All spoke with feeling, because it was a subject that came home to their hearts—bitter and sweet experience, both were theirs—the former, past—the latter, present. Dr. Winslow addressed the audience also, in some appropriate remarks and bestowed a high compliment upon the government and people, and also upon G. P. Judd, Esq., for the zeal and success with which he had labored in their cause. But want of space compells us to be brief. A temperance glee was sung by the young chiefs, accompanied by one of them on the piano, which afforded great satisfaction to their royal auditors. Rev. Mr. Armstrong asked the children if they were going to continue to keep the pledge. The thousands rose en masse, and made the lofty roof ring and ring again with their loud and enthusiastic “ae.” The whole exercises were of the most interesting nature, and we are happy to add, gave great pleasure to the strangers present. The procession then returned to the fort, and there dispersed.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., a procession was again formed at the Fort, to march to the Feast which was given to the subjects of His Majesty, in the same house as the day before. His Majesty’s household guards, in neat uniform—150 strong—headed the procession, commanded by Colonel Stephens; next came the band. Her Majesty, the Queen, supported by the King, and the Secretary of State. The Premier, attended by C. Kanaina and her pages, with kahilis. The Governess of Kauai, by Governor Young and Mr. Ii; the other female chiefs, according to their rank, attended by officers of the government, (on their right, the Royal standard bearers and guards: outside of them, and on both sides, His Majesty’s body guard) the governors, chiefs, and officers, generally, in full uniform, (the commanders of the soldiery, and the aids of Governor Kekuanaoa, on horseback,) and a long procession formed by those invited, (black being the costume of the ladies,) and escorted, on either side, by double files of soldiers, in white uniforms. The procession marched through the principal streets, which were crowded by the concourse of spectators, to Beretania, where the guests were seated at the feast, in nearly the same order as the day before. The first toast was

By Her Royal Highness, the Premier:—”His Hawaiian Majesty, Kamehameha III.”—”God save the King”, by the band;—21 guns, and [?????] cheers.

The second toast was

By the Secretary of State:—”Her Royal Highness, the Premier.” Music, and loud applause.

The third toast was

By the Attorney General:—”Her Majesty, Kalama, Queen of the Hawaiian Islands.” Music, and shouts of applause.

Great good humor prevailed, and toasts followed in quick succession.

His Majesty gave:—”The prospective King, Queen, Premier, and Rulers, of the Kingdom”,—which was received with loud cheers—three times three.

“The Hon. Secretary of State,”—”The Officers of the Government,”—”The absent Envoys, Messrs. Haalilio and Richards,”—and many other toasts, were drunk with great applause, and called forth several short, but spirited addresses.

“The Memory of ‘Kamehameha, the Great,'” standing, and in silence.

After remaining two hours at the table, His Majesty arose, the procession was reformed, and returned to the Fort, where the King was received with loud cheers by his subjects; after which the trops were dismissed, and the company dispersed.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

effect. Mr. Ii, of his Majesty's...

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

The marriage of Kauikeaouli to Kalama Kapakuhaili, 1837.

MARRIAGE OF THE KING.

Honolulu, Feb. 2, 1837.

KAUIKEAOULI the King of the Hawaiian archipelago and KALAMA, the daughter of Naihekukui was wed by Mr. Bingham [Binamu].

At the stone house of Kekauluohi and Kanaina, the aunty and uncle [makua] of that girl, is where their marriage took place, and the wedding reception of the Alii, and the singing of the marriage hymn. After that, they went to pray at the church that night at the great assembly. “Marriage is honourable in all.” And this marriage is greatly respected by their true friends.

Long live the King!

May his kingdom have great peace.

(Kumu Hawaii, 2/1/1837, p. 72)

KA MARE ANA O KE LII.

Ke Kumu Hawaii, Buke 2, Pepa 18, Aoao 72. Feberuari 1, 1837.

Alatau Tamchiboulac Atkinson, organist for Kawaiahao Church, 1873.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU KULOKO.”]

Mr. A. T. Atkinson has been made the organist [hookani ogana] for the Kawaiahao Church, and beginning this week, he will perform alone for the first time.

[This is just a tiny episode in the amazing life of Alatau Atkinson. There will be a talk on his life given by visiting author and journalist Nick Fielding at the Center for Biographical Research, UH Manoa today from noon to 1:15 at Henke Hall!]

(Au Okoa, 1/23/1873, p. 3)

Ua hooliloia iho nei...

Ke Au Okoa, Buke VIII, Helu 41, Aoao 3. Ianuari 23, 1873.

Lunalilo Crypt, 1875.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Crypt of Lunalilo.—Because of the request by the Executor of the Will of the Deceased dearly beloved King Lunalilo to Kawaiahao Church, for a place to build his crypt, as per his will, therefore, an open space in front of the church was given, makai of the circular yard right in front of the entrance to the church. There will be built his crypt and he will sleep there with his people in the same cemetery. How sad this is!

(Kuokoa, 9/19/1875, p. 2)

Hale Kupapau o Lunalilo.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 38, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 19, 1874.