Death of Edward Kamakau Lilikalani, 1917.

Edward K. Lilikalani Left this Life Behind

On the Fourth of last week, Edward K. Lilikalani left this life at sixty-eight years of age at his home on 415 Queen Street, and on this Sunday his body was carried from Williams’ place [mortuary] for the cemetery of Kawaiahao where the last service will be held over his body by the kahu of Kawaiahao, H. H. Parker. Continue reading

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Mele for Kalakaua, the King, 1874.

KUMULIPO KALAKAUA

He inoa Lani, he inoa Haku,
O Kumulipo o Kalakaua,
E lohe ko ke ao a puni,
O Kalakaua, oia ka Moi.

Cho.—E ola o ka Lani,
E ola ka Moi,
E lohe ko ke ao a puni,
O Kalakaua, oia ka Moi. Continue reading

On the 100th anniversary of the passing of Queen Liliuokalani, 1917-2017.

[Found under: “LILIUOKALANI. A Published Interview With Her.”]

The Hawaiians are my people, and I am still their Queen. To the Hawaiians I shall always be Queen while I am alive, and after I am dead I shall still be their Queen—their dead Queen. But Hawaii is not in the hands of its people. From other countries all kinds of people have come—some wise, some foolish, some good, some very mean. They found fortunes in my county under the protection of my fathers, and then they robbed me of my throne.

[This quote is taken from an interview by Jule de Rytiler originally published in the American Woman’s Home Journal. For the entire interview as published by the Independent, see here.]

(Independent, 4/1/1897, p. 4)

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The Independent, Volume IV, Number 547, Page 4. April 1, 1897.

 

Hawaii State Archives collection of Queen Liliuokalani photographs now online, 2017.

Queen Liliuokalani Photograph Exhibition

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of Queen Liliʻuokalani, Hawai‘i’s last reigning monarch, the Hawaiʻi State Archives is pleased to announce the digital release of the Queen Liliʻuokalani Photograph Exhibition.

[Go check it out here!]

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Hawaii State Archives, Photograph Collection, PP-98-13-019

Kaiulani Elementary School celebrates the birthday of the Princess, 1899.

KAIULANI SCHOOL

Pupils Have a Holiday Next Monday.

Exercises This Evening In Honor of the Princess’s Birthday—Program for the Occasion.

Monday being the anniversary of the late Princess Kaiulani’s birthday, the pupils of the Princess Kaiulani school will be given a whole holiday.

Exercises will be held this evening in the large hall, but owing to the lack of seating accommodation no invitations have been sent out to parents or friends this year. The program is the work of the pupils entirely. They devoted a good portion of yesterday to obtaining ilima leis and maile to decorate the picture of the late Princess. Continue reading

Patriotism, 1893.

THE PEOPLE OF HAWAII HAVE ALOHA FOR THEIR ALII.

From ancient times, from all the way into the realm of po, from early on, from the very beginning, born was the aloha of Hawaiian Men, Hawaiian Women, and the Offspring of their loins, for their Alii, all the way until this very day; it would seem that it is greater than anything else pertaining to their sovereign, and it would seem there is no greater proof than the words pronounced by our King Kauliluaikeanuwaialeale [Kalakaua], when he went on that famous trip around the world in the year 1881, and upon his treading once more upon his birth sands; this is what he stated:

KE KAENA A KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ua kaahele au maluna o ka ilihonua me ka moana,
A Inia mamao, a me Kina kaulana,
Hoea i na aekai o Aferika, a na palena o Europa,
A halawai me ka ikaika o na aina a pau,
A ia’u i ku ai ma ka aoao o na Poo Aupuni,
Ka poe mana maluna o ka lakou ma ka hiehie Alii,
Hoomaopopo iho la i ka uku-iki, a nawaliwali o Ko’u,
Me Ko’u Nohoalii i hookahuaia maluna o kahi puu Pele,
A ma kahi o na miliona i hooko i ka keia mau Moi,
He mau tausani wale iho no malalo o Ko’u malu,
Aka, ka upu nei loko, Na’u ke Kaena hiki,
Aia he mau nani maloko o na poai o Ko’u mau aekai—
I oi aku ka makamae i ka O’u mau hoa Moi,
Aohe O’u kumu hopo maloko o Ko’u Aupuni,
He hiki ke hui me Ko’u lahui me ka weli ole,
Aohe maka’u No’u iho, me ke kiai pili-paa ole ia,
A Na’u ke Kaena, he momi i hoounaia mailuna mai Na’u—
Eia ia’u ke aloha oiaio o Ko’u Lahui.

[The first time I heard these powerful words was from a Palani Vaughan record (and looking back, I think he is one of the many reasons why this blog exists today). I heard it and thought man, that is definitely not a boast that could seriously be claimed by any other of his fellow leaders of his time (so much less by those of today). And when I first saw Kalakaua’s words restated in this article after the overthrow, it made the statement even more profound. This, by the way, was so important that they reprinted it again on 1/21/1893!

For the English version from an article right after Kalakaua’s return, click here! Learn the stories!! Pass them forward!!!]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 3. Ianuari 18, 1893.