Aloha is a reciprocal thing, 1779, 1867 and beyond.

[From: S. M. Kamakau’s “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I: Ke Au ia Kalaniopuu A. D. 1779. No ka Make ana o Kapena Kuke, Oia Hoi o Lono.”]

Kalaniopuu treated Captain Cook generously, and gave him pigs, taro, sweet potato, bananas, and other things; he also gave him ahuula capes, mahiole, kahili, feather lei, fine wooden bowls, various fine kapa, ahu ao mats from Puna, and garments of hinalo—Captain Cook gave Kalaniopuu some rubbish—(It is said that the hat that Captain Cook gave to Kalaniopuu is in the head of the kaai of Keaweikekahialiiokamoku.)

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1867, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 5, Aoao 1. Feberuari 2, 1867.

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“E mau ka maluhia o nei Pae Aina,” 1872.

[Found under: “NA OLELO HOOLAHA.”]

Hawaiian National Anthem.—THIS MELE composed by the Hon. Mrs. Lilia K. Dominis has come in; there are many copies of this famous mele from San Francisco, and it can be had for the low price of a quarter, at the Book Shop of H. M. Whitney [H. M. Wini].

(Kuokoa, 12/14/1872, p. 3)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 14, 1872.

The grand celebration of the 64th birthday of Princess Ruta Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa Muolaulani Keikiheleloa Keanohalia Kaleonahenahe Kohalikolani at her newly completed Keoua Hale, 1882.

Birthday of Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani.

Her Royal Highness Princess Ruth Keelikolani celebrated, on Thursday last, her sixty-fourth birthday by a luau, or banquet in native Hawaiian fashion, given at H. R. H.’s new mansion in Emma-street, followed on the evening of Friday by a Reception and Ball. The occasion was indeed adopted for the “house-warming” the handsome and beautifully decorated house being only just ready for occupation. The event has been long talked of, and looked forward to, and has been the chief topic of conversation during the past week, almost to the exclusion of all others, causing the exciting events of the previous week to fall quite into the background.

The Mansion which was the scene of these festivities is situated on the land known as Kaakopua, which has a long frontage to the Ewa side of Emma-Street. It is a handsome structure of two main stories, on a high basement with an attic story and turret above. On the main floor on the mauka side of the house, are two drawing rooms which communicate with one another by a wide arch. Continue reading

A lei for Liliuokalani composed by Mrs. Nahaukapu, 1894.

He Lei No Liliuokalani

He lei he wehi nou e Kalani
O Liliu i ka walu o na lani
Aia i Hawaii ko lei alii
Ka onohi kaimana o ke aupuni
Mai puni oe i ka mali a ka u’a
A ka ili puakea o Maleka
Huli mai ko alo kapu e Kalani
E aloha i ke kupa o ka aina
Aia i ka poho o ko lima
Ke ola o ka lahui Hawaii
Ua ike Makalii me Kaelo
Ua lohe ka uwila ka pae opua
A he pua o Kalani aia iluna
Ke kiekie no i Halealii
Haina ka wohi nona ka lei
O Liliu i ka walu o na lani. Continue reading

Hui Aloha Aina o Kalawao me Kalaupapa, 1898.

[Found under: “LOKAHI IO NO KA LAHUI.”]*

Kalaupapa, Mar. 4, 1898.

Miss Lucy Peabody,
Treasurer for the Funds of the Hawaiian Delegates.

Honolulu,

Aloha oe,

We are sending by your hand thirty dollars ($30.00). That being $25.00 from the Patriotic League of Kalawao and Kalaupapa, and a $5.00 gift from the Angel Society, “Hui Anela” of Kalaupapa, with hopes that the sum reaches your hand in entirety. Continue reading

Donation from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, 1898.

ASSISTANCE FOR THE DELEGATES.

The Treasurer of the Delegates’ Funds, Miss Lucy Peabody, received from the Head Secretary of the Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina] of the Hawaiian Archipelago, fifteen dollars ($15.00) from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, Molokai.

[Even fifteen dollars was a great sum of money during those days.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/26/1898, p. 5)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Feberuari 26, 1898.

Aloha Aina! 1898.

ALOHA FOR REMEMBERING.

Yes, our hearts are awed and deeply moved seeing the beloved assistance of the patients of Kalaupapa for the Delegates of the lahui. This is a great gift for us for it arrived like manna from heaven; the little amount that they sent is far greater than the thousands and hundreds from those who are prosperous.  For their living is not in luxury, nor in joy, but in constant grief, sorrow, and anguish. And as there was encouragement to all Patriots urging them to give assistance to our Delegates, a feeling of excitement awoke in the minds of these frail ones to give aloha to their fellow men who are tirelessly working in the fury of Washington for the rights of the land, the people, and the monarchy of Hawaii. Continue reading