Queen Liliuokalani’s composition not credited here in original or translation, 1867.

Hawaiian Music.—It is something to hear of Hawaiians, who but a few years ago, as a nation, possessed no other songs but the semi-barbarous Meles of their ancestors, and no other music than the montonous “ah—ah,——o—oo—u—uu,” of former years,—it is something pleasingly new to have to note the appearance of a neatly lithographed sheet of music for sale in the bookstore, both the words and music of which were composed by a Hawaiian lady. The title describes the sentiments expressed in the composition—”He Mele Lahui Hawaii,” or, in English, “A Hawaiian National Hymn.” Continue reading

Hawaiian National Hymn, 1883.

KE MELE LAHUI.

Composed by Her Highness
Princess Liliuokalani.

1.

Ka Makua Mana Loa
Maliu mai ia makou
E Haliu aku nei
Me ka naau haahaa
E mau ka maluhia
O nei Paeaina
Mai Hawaii a Niihau
Malalo o Kou malu
E Ola! E Ola ka Moi!

Cho.—E mau ke Ea o ka Aina
Ma Kou pono mau
A ma Kou mana nui
E Ola! E Ola ka Moi. Continue reading

Political Ad, 1903.

ABRAHAM FERNANDEZ

ABAELAHAMA

SUPERVISOR AT LARGE [LUNA KIAI HOLO LAULA].

He was born in Honolulu, Oahu, June 22, 1857, educated at the Royal School of Kahehuna. He was a storekeeper for the store of E. O. Hall & Son, for many years. He was a member of the road board during the Monarchy. He was a member of the Privy Council of the Monarchy in the year 1892. Continue reading

Death of Colonel Sam Parker, 1920.

SAMUEL PARKER DEPARTS FROM THIS LIFE

Death is Victorious Over Him, Following a Long Sickness

HIS BODY RETURNED TO WAILUA IN MANA, HAWAII

Escorted by his Grandchild David Kalakaua Kawananakoa and His Family

After suffering from a stroke some years ago, Colonel Samuel Parker grew weary of this life, on the night of last Friday, at his home outside of Waikiki, and his body was returned aboard the Mauna Kea of this past Wednesday to be laid to rest in his family cemetery at Mana, Waimea, Hawaii.

When he passed on, he was 66 years old, 10 months and 12 days. Continue reading

Peter Kalani, new bandmaster, 1915.

QUEEN CONGRATULATES BANDMASTER KALANI

Peter Kalani, the newly appointed bandmaster, beat the measure with his official baton yesterday for the first time, at a morning concert given in Queen Liliuokalani’s grounds. Continue reading

Birth of the new Alii, 1875.

The Hon. A. S. Cleghorn was blessed with being gifted with a beautiful daughter by his wife, the Alii Likelike Cleghorn. This is a new Royal Offspring in the era of King Kalakaua. Our humble plea is for the Heavens to watch over and bless Hawaii,

(Lahui Hawaii, 10/21/1875, p. 3)

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 43, Aoao 3. Okatoba 21, 1875.

The bells of the city rang a merry peal, 1875.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23.

ON SATURDAY morning last, the 16th instant, Her Royal Highness the Princess Miriam Likelike, sister to His Majesty the King, and wife of the Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, was safely delivered of a daughter. At four P. M. all the bells of the city rang a merry peal in honor of the infant Princess.

(PCA, 10/23/1875, p. 2)

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XX, Number 17, Page 2. October 23, 1875.

The pillow mele for Kaahumanu, and the power of the newspapers, 1907.

One reason why the newspapers were/are so important was because they were “immediate,” just as I suppose Facebook and Twitter is today. One person claims something in the newspaper one day, and a few days later you could see more information or contradicting information by someone else, and not necessarily even in the same newspaper. Because people back in the day wanted the latest news, they would subscribe to the different newspapers being printed at the time, or at least would share them with each other. Continue reading

Birth announcements, 1880.

Captain W. P. Kalolina was blessed with being presented with by his “Eve,” two boys on the 5th of this September. Those who bear fruit of their loins are fortunate for it is an expansion of the lahui [hooulu lahui] in this era of King Kalakaua. The names of these offsprings are Kealiipunikuhina and Keliialohamakaainana. Continue reading