Fourth of July in Hawaii, 1894.

THE FOURTH OF JULY.

A Very Tame Celebration.

All true Americans residing in Honolulu, regret the manner in which their national holiday was celebrated. The bastard attempt of Mr. Dole to mix local politics into the ceremony with which Americans at home or absent remember the day on which a legitimate and a truly popular republic was born, resulted in a dead failure.

The town has never on a similar day presented a more quiet and peaceful front. The Hawaiians who generally have been lively participators in celebration of America’s National day staid at home, and refused to join the crowd who were forgetting the lofty principles of the great republic by rejoicing in the establishing of a rich man’s oligarchy. Continue reading

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Kamehameha Day, 100 years ago, 1917.

KAMEHAMEHA DAY.

According to Chairman Edgar Henriques of the Celebration Committee for the coming 11th of June, the Program for the Celebration has been prepared; starting on Sunday the 10th will be the memorial in Kawaiahao Church, and on the following 11th will be the parade from Aala Park to the Palace Grounds, in this manner:

8:30 A. M. The procession of all of the Hawaiian Associations from Aala Park to the Kamehameha Statue, and from there to the Palace Grounds where speeches of the day will be held. Continue reading

Commentary on Hawaiian Music and Liliu’s “Mele Lahui Hawaii,” 1867.

Hawaiian Music.—It is something to hear of Hawaiians, who but a few years ago, as a nation, possessed no other songs but the semi-barbarous Meles of their ancestors, and no other music than the montonous “ah—ah,——o—oo—u—uu,” of former years,—it is something pleasingly new to have to note the appearance of a neatly lithographed sheet of music for sale in the bookstore, both the words and music of which were composed by a Hawaiian lady. The title describes the sentiments expressed in the composition—”He Mele Lahui Hawaii,” or, in English, “A Hawaiian National Hymn.” The words are not rhyme, but read smoothly, with the euphony characteristic of the Hawaiian tongue, and the music is very sweet, the first few bars resembling those of the popular song of “Hazel Dell.” When sung by a full choir of natives, many of whom, male and female, have well managed voices of peculiar sweetness of tone, the “National Hymn,” expressing as it does both piety and patriotism, cannot fail to become popular. The lithography is very creditably done at Newcomb & Co’s book-bindery. We subjoin a translations of the words:

Almighty Father, bend thine ear,
And list the nation’s prayer,
That lowly bows before thy throne,
And seeks thy fostering care.
Grant thy peace throughout the land,
O’er each sunny sea-girt isle;
Keep the nation’s life, O Lord,
And upon our Sovereign smile. Continue reading

News out of Lahaina, 1867.

From Lahaina.

Pertaining to the Queen.—Queen Emma has returned from her tour of Wailuku on this past Tuesday evening of May, and it was at 8 o’clock that she reached here in Lahaina. She was accompanied by the distinguished ones of the valley shade [ka malu hekuawa], and she returned with her attendants who went along, His Ex. P. Nahaolelua, Col. D. Kalakaua, Hon. P. Y. Kekuaokalani, Hon. A. M. Kahalewai and Mrs. Kalakaua.

Exhibit of paintings.—This past Thursday night, there was a great exhibit of illustrations at the School of the English Mission; there were many portraits shown that night, all of Hawaii’s Alii; and we admired all of the paintings, and they were done with skill; in attendance as well was the Queen.

A Party.—On the evening of Thursday, Reverend G. Mason held a party to honor the Queen, and those who were instructed, and everything carried out at the party was gracious, and the tables were laden with things of all sorts, and we ate until satiated, and a most was leftover. Continue reading

Liliu’s National Anthem reaches New York, after a fashion, 1875.

Their National Hymn.

The words and music of the Hawaiian national anthem are both the composition of Mrs. Lila K. Dominis, the sister of King Kalakaua. The first part of the hymn we transcribe for the edification of our readers:

HE MELE LAHIU HAWAII.

Ka Makua Mana Loa,
Malin wai ia wakou,
E haliu aku rei.
We wa hian haahan,
E wan ka waluhia
O rei Pae Alna,
Wal Hawaiia Nuhan,
Mololo o Kou Malu. Continue reading