Liliu’s National Anthem reaches New York, after a fashion, 1875.

Their National Hymn.

The words and music of the Hawaiian national anthem are both the composition of Mrs. Lila K. Dominis, the sister of King Kalakaua. The first part of the hymn we transcribe for the edification of our readers:

HE MELE LAHIU HAWAII.

Ka Makua Mana Loa,
Malin wai ia wakou,
E haliu aku rei.
We wa hian haahan,
E wan ka waluhia
O rei Pae Alna,
Wal Hawaiia Nuhan,
Mololo o Kou Malu. Continue reading

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More information from the December 28, 1891 meeting at Manamana, 1892.

[Found under: “Halawai Makaainana”]

Within that spacious structure at Manamana, gathered together was a huge crowd  because of a call out to all to an open meeting of the people on Monday night, December 28, 1891. Before the meeting time, there were songs performed by the Hawaiian band in honor of the meeting.

Here are the people who came that we recorded:

Hon. A. Rosa, J. L. Kaulukou, J. K. Kaulia, J. M. Poepoe, J. E. Poepoe, T. K. Nakanaela, W. C. Achi, J. Kalana, J. U. Kawainui, E. Johnson, I. D. Iaea, W. H. Kahumoku, J. A. Kahoonei, J. Kanui, S. K. Aki, J. B. Kuoha, Paulo Aea, J. Alapai, E. Naukana, J. Heleluhe, Rev. J. Waiamau, E. K. Lilikalani, S. L. Kawelo, S. K. Ka-ne, J. N. K. Keola, J. Nalua, D. M. Aea, G. L. Desha, Umauma, Mailolo, D. Malo, Haili, Lii, F. Meka, Continue reading

Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

Fish appear once more at Kaanapali, 1862.

Kaanapali’s fish have returned.

Those words are proudly placed above. Kaanapali’s fish have returned; so that our friends from Hawaii of Keawe to Kauai of Mano will know the news of the seasons. In this year that we are living, the native fishes of that land have come once more. They being the Kawakawa, Opelu, Muhee, Nehu. Continue reading

Hauoli La Hanau, e Mary Kawena Pukui! 1964.

Isle Scholar Celebrates Birthday With New Work

By MARY COOKE

Mary Kawena Pukui, dean of Hawaiian scholars, has two reasons to celebrate today.

It’s her 69th birthday, and the English-Hawaiian Dictionary, part of a project for which she started the research 30 years ago, is just out.

It is a companion volume of the Hawaiian-English Dictionary published in 1957. On both works her collaborator was Dr. Samuel H. Elbert of the University of Hawaii who studied the language with her. Both were published by the University Press.

“IT IS such a relief,” Kawena began in the light, unhurried conversational tones of a Hawaiian tutu, “to have the dictionaries finished.”

But her dark eyes sparkled with the intensity of the scholar as she added, “now I can go ahead with the Kamakau.”

She explained that some years ago she translated the writings on Hawaiian religion, arts and crafts by the early Hawaiian author, Samuel Kamakau. Now she is reviewing the work for publication with Dorothy Barrere of the Bishop Museum.

“AND THERE are lots of other things I want to do, too,” she said with characteristic forward-looking zeal.

Kawena is modest about looking backward. But the record shows 40 years of persistent, scholarly accomplishment as researcher, translator, compiler and writer of authentic Hawaiiana.

Thirty-seven titles in Bishop Museum listings covering ethnology, sociology, natural history and linguistics are the work of Mary Pukui alone or in collaboration with scientists and other writers.

HER MOTIVATION is the urgency she feels to research and record all possible knowledge of the indigenous culture of Hawaii.

When she began writing and translating years ago she started a card file of Hawaiian words “for whoever would do a new Hawaiian dictionary… I never thought I was going to be the one to do it,” she said.

Her source material was Hawaiian newspapers and magazines, the Hawaiian Bible, catechisms and religious writings of all denominations, legends, folk lore, chants and writings of early native scholars.

Legal terms and land law terms were translated, and from the modern Hawaiian vocabulary, such contemporary words as “air raid” and “blackout” were also included.

KAWENA, with Eleanor Williamson of the Bishop Museum, also traveled remote areas of the Islands with a tape recorder to garner all she could from living memories about pronunciation and meanings of words.

She says the Hawaiian language frequently is complicated by multiple meanings.

Advertiser Photo by Charles Okamura

MARY KAWENA PUKUI Continue reading