Faith, 1893.

THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

The Hawaiian people have faith in the righteousness and the justice of the Americans; therefore they have great trust that Minister Willis will come and make right the outrageous offense that Minister Stevens and Captain Wiltse committed against this upright peoples. Therefore the Americans will dispense justice for Hawaii in 1893 just as Great Britain did too in 1843. Continue reading

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The U. S. S. Boston, John L. Stevens, and the Hawaiian flag, 1893.

PROTECTORATE.

At nine o’clock this morning, and since the editorial matter of The Liberal was in type, the United States flag was hoisted upon the Capitol by Captain Wiltse of the U. S. S. Boston and a United States Protectorate was proclaimed over the Hawaiian Islands in the name of the American Government, pending negotiations now going on at Washington. The troops saluted the American flag first and immediately thereafter faced about and saluted the Hawaiian flag. The following is the text of the proclamation:

TO THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

At the request of the Provisional Government of the Hawaiian Islands, I hereby, in the name of the United States of America, assume the protection of the Hawaiian Islands for the protection of life and property, and occupation of the public buildings and Hawaiian soil, so far as may be necessary for the purpose of specified, but not interfering with the administration of public affairs by the Provisional Government.

This action is taken pending, and subject to, negotiations at Washington.

John L. Stevens,

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States.

United States Legation, February 1, 1893.

Approved and executed by

G. C. Wiltse, Captain U. S. N.

Commanding the United States Ship “Boston.”

(Liberal, 2/1/1893, p. 2)

PROTECTORATE.

The Liberal, Volume I, Number 41, Page 2. February 1, 1893.

Observations from an Englishman, 1893.

From a Travelling Englishman.

From the time I arrived in Honolulu until today, I’ve heard often of matters pertaining to those referred to as the circle of missionaries, and the dimness of their ideas; I’ve observed their actions very carefully.

I saw today in the Advertiser [Avalataisa] about the party being given for Captain Wiltse, and how they will sit at this party for two hours and a half with just wine to drink and nothing to eat.

Giving a banquet for a high ranking Captain without serving Glasses of Champaigne [Kamapeni] during all that time is like acting out Hamlet without the ghost.

This will not become something that is greatly ridiculed, but this goes back to the way of life of the old Missionaries, with  their humbling station of evil thoughts.

On the day after this party, I saw that Queen Liliuokalani was sent an invitation under the name Mrs. J. O. Dominis, and this is something quite vile by the Committee who did it; Should the Committee think that are considered adults, then it was improper of them to have sent such an invitation to the Queen.

The first thing taught to schoolchildren in Britain is not to kick a man when he falls down. But this is a woman they are kicking, and that woman is Queen Liliuokalani. This is action that can be called despicable of the meanest form, and should this Committee want to be freed of these words, then they must explain it from their side, or this contemptible act will be carried upon their backs.

Charles G. Nottage.

Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], Feb. 28, 1893.

[Perhaps this was meant to say that there was no wine, and only sparkling water? The article he seems to be talking about is found here on the Chronicling America site. PCA 2/28/1893, p. 2.

There is also reference to a separate party that he was invited to. The Queen is mentioned as “Mrs. J. O. Dominis”. This can be found also at Chronicling America, PCA 2/25/1893, p. 4.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 3/3/1893, p. 3)

Mai Kekahi Haole Pelekane Kaahele Mai.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 654, Aoao 3. Maraki 3, 1893.

The USS Boston leaves Hawaii, 1893.

That Wicked Eel Has Left.

On this day, the American warship Boston left the harbor and the land of which it assisted in persecuting and stealing its independence with the missionary descendants from Boston. Where could its previous captain [Gilbert C. Wiltse] be resting? According to the Calvinists, he is in Heaven, and perhaps the ship will go to fetch him.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 9/26/1893, p. 3)

Ua Haalele mai ka Puhi Ino.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 777, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 26, 1893.