Despicable, 1917.

HEINOUS ACT

Honolulu,  Nov. 1—One of the most heinous acts was carried out by some people who know nothing of honor, or who know no fear of doing evil, by them breaking down the door of the Crypt of King Lunalilo at Kawaiahao, Continue reading

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Law on naming, 1863.

Pertaining to Names.

Because we come across all sorts of names, and because we believe that the Law passed on the 24th of August, 1860; that being the Law called, “An Act to regulate names” [“He Kanawai e hooponopono ana i na inoa”] has not been followed, therefore, we wanted to discuss this Important matter with our friends. So that our friends do not fail to recognize this, we print the aforementioned Law, and here it is:

AN ACT
TO REGULATE NAMES.

Be it enacted, By the King, the Nobles and Representatives of the Hawaiian Islands, in Legislative Council assembled:

Section 1. All married women now living, and all that may be married hereafter on these Islands, shall, from and after the passage of this Act, adopt the names o f their husbands as a family  name.

Section 2. All children born in wedlock after the passage of this Act shall have their father’s name as a family name. They shall, besides, have a Christian name suitable to their sex.

Section 3. All illegitimate children born after the passage of this Act shall have their mother’s name as a family name. They shall, besides, have a Christian name suitable to their sex.

Section 4. All children up to the age of twenty years shall adopt the names of their fathers as a family name.

Section 5. All names so adopted shall be reported to the agents appointed to take the census of the people during the present year.

Section 6. It shall not be lawful to change any name adopted or conferred under the law. It shall also not be lawful to change any name adopted or conferred before the operation of this.

Section 7. The father or mother of any child born subsequently to the passage of this Act, shall report the name or names of such child to the Registrar of births for the district in which such child was born, within three months after the birth of such child.

Section 8. This law shall take effect from and after the date of its passage.

Approved this 24th of August, A. D. 1860.

KAMEHAMEHA,
KAAHUMANU.* Continue reading

Missionary advice about mele, 1860.

Pertaining to Mele

Perhaps all of the mele of the olden days are almost gone; those who know them are but a few. This is regretful because through those mele we can know how people lived a long, long ago, and the stories of the land as well. The means by which the mele will survive forever and not disappear is by printing them in books and maybe in newspapers; that way the future generations can read and contemplate and know of the misconceptions of their kupuna and not follow in their misguided footsteps. Continue reading

What will happen to the people suffering from leprosy? 1893.

PERTAINING TO THE MA’I LEPERA.

What will become of the friends who are suffering from being dealt with that hand of grief and sadness from here on. We are now under a new government and new Board of Health [Papa Ola], but their Commissioners are in Washington where they are trying to annex us with America, and if we are indeed annexed, what will happen to our friends who are afflicted with this sickness? That nation is very frightened and hateful of those who have the disease, and what in the world will be the outcome?

(Hawaii Holomua, 3/11/1893, p. 3)

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Scholarships from the government, 1892

ANNOUNCING.

This is a list of the few children who are at some schools, with the names of their parents and where they came from. Whereas the Legislature set aside $6,000 for the tuition of these children.

Oahu College [Punahou], 9.

E. A. Rosa, Samuel Mahelona, R. Ross, Margaret Mossman, Florence Carter; Edward Woodward of Honolulu, Oahu.

C. K. Farden, Makawao, Maui; M. Sunter, Kona, Hawaii; Edward Hapai, G. W. A. Hapai, Hilo, Hawaii.

Kamehameha School.

Robert Baker, H. R. Baker, Honolulu, Oahu; S. Kupau, J. K. Kupau, Waianae, Oahu; Eli Pihi, Rev. S. Kapu, Wailuku Maui; W. Makakoa, W. K. Makakoa, Waihee, Maui; J. Kauka, Kauka, Makawao, Maui; Alfred Kahilialau, M. Kane, Halawa; William Beers, J. W. Moanauli, Honokaa, Hamakua. Continue reading

Fourth of July in Hawaii, 1894.

THE FOURTH OF JULY.

A Very Tame Celebration.

All true Americans residing in Honolulu, regret the manner in which their national holiday was celebrated. The bastard attempt of Mr. Dole to mix local politics into the ceremony with which Americans at home or absent remember the day on which a legitimate and a truly popular republic was born, resulted in a dead failure.

The town has never on a similar day presented a more quiet and peaceful front. The Hawaiians who generally have been lively participators in celebration of America’s National day staid at home, and refused to join the crowd who were forgetting the lofty principles of the great republic by rejoicing in the establishing of a rich man’s oligarchy. Continue reading

Mele and education according to Andrew K. Poepoe, 1930.

Modern Teacher Tells How Old Hawaiians Were Taught

By A. K. POEPOE

(This is the second article by Mr. Poepoe, a Normal school instructor, telling of Hawaiian tone production methods.)

A story obtained from Kona, Hawaii, and recorded by the late Dr. Emerson, mentioning one of the methods used for the training of the chanters conveys to me several fundamental principles vital to vocal art, that aid in verifying the distinct tone focus and timbre in the Hawaiian voice.

“It refers to a little pool of shallow water in the rocks by the sea at Kailua, Hawaii, where the sun was reflected late every afternoon for a considerable interval. This and similar pools were called ‘poho na’u,’ poho, meaning both a depression in the surface and to blow gently. These pools were great swimming centers in olden times. Continue reading