Kamaka Stillman refutes the story about Naeole raising Kamehameha, 1911.

A Response by “O-u-ka-maka-o-ka-wauke-oi-opiopio.”

Mr. Editor of Ke Au Hou:

With appreciation:—Please allow me my clarification pertaining to the one who raised Kamehameha I that was shown in the newspaper “Kuokoa Home Rula” on the 10th of February past, 1911, which said that it was Naeole. But forgive me for the tardiness of my response, for I soon received my issue of that paper mentioned above from a friend last week, and in order that the actual person who raised Kamehameha I is made known, that it is not Naeole as is being stated, that is why I am publishing this without intent to elevate chiefly genealogy, for the rude statements are embarrassing; there are so many people who are associated with alii, and covetous of alii who have genealogies that are printed in books. Pertaining to the parentage of Kamehameha, here it is: Continue reading

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Fishing using explosives, 1895.

The Blasting of Fish Prevails.

Mr. Editor:

On the travels of the Circuit Court Judge of Maui, to Kaupo, Kipahulu, Hana, and all the way to the Koolau cliffs of Maui, to ask for money for the building of Wailuku, and we were lucky in what money was collected. I was one who went along on this journey. When we reached Kipahulu, to Hakuole’s place, a policeman, with his son, Kimo Hakuole who is a school teacher; the locals were very hospitable. Continue reading

This letter to the editor of the Nuhou is interesting in so many ways. 1873.

NOT GOOD.

When I saw the newspaper Nuhou Hawaii; I was greatly gladdened to see it. When I took a close look, I was very happy. I talked with my wife, “Hey, this paper, Nuhou Hawaii, it is very good for us to subscribe to this paper.” Please don’t be upset at my bad writing. Gibson, I have much appreciation for you; at your great strength in saying that they should not give Puuloa [Pearl Harbor]. I talk in Chinese; all of Honolulu is appreciative of you. Continue reading

Words of advice from a concerned Hawaiian, 1944.

SINGING HAWAIIAN SONGS

Editor The Advertiser:

As a Hawaiian I enjoy listening to the sweet Hawaiian music on my radio from 7:30 a.m. to midnight. But I agree with many other Hawaiians who I have heard complain about our young peoples singing nowadays. Perhaps there might be a way to help these young generation and also the future generations keep up the proper way of singing our beloved Hawaiian songs and not to murder them or change them as they are being changed by jazzing or perhaps boogle them. Why not keep them as the composer intended to express their feelings. For example the song, “Kahuahuai.” It is not a war chant. It’s a love song telling of their love for each other and how they had weathered the cold together among the fragranted ferns, etc. Continue reading

Memorial of Protest from the women of Hilo, 1898.

KUE MEMORIALA.

O makou o na Komite o ka Ahahui Aloha Aina o na Wahine i kohoia e ka halawai i noho ma ka la 29 o Sepatemaba 1898, ma Hilo Taona.

Ma keia ke kue loa aku nei i ka Memoriala a ka Ahahui Kuwaena o ka Ahahui Aloha Aina o na Wahine o Honolulu, malalo o na kumu kupono. Continue reading

From the Ahahui Aloha Aina Kuwaena o na Wahine, 1898.

THE UMBILICAL CORD OF THE SIBLINGS ARE CUT.

This is something we made known from the very beginning, during the days when the tender-eyed ladies of the Women’s Central Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina Kuwaena o na Wahine] were drawing away [huki laweau]; when their kindling was not placed where the flames were burning, and now we received by way of the Kinau on Saturday night, that the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo requested to dissolve their membership under the Women’s Central Patriotic League here in Honolulu; they, who we restrained from the beginning, not to do what the majority of the nation does not want, and here is the result; the umbilical cords of the siblings are cut, by way of a Memorial from there, and that is what is below, so that it is seen by everyone without fail.

(Aloha Aina, 10/8/1898, p. 3)

AlohaAina_10_8_1898_3

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 41, Aoao 3. Okatoba 8, 1898.