Medical school for young Hawaiians, 1870.

Kahunas.

We understand that one of our physicians, who is thoroughly conversant with the native language, has been authorized to form a class of eight or ten Hawaiian young men, (graduates of the highest schools,) for instruction in the principles and practice of medicine.

There has never been made, that we are aware of, any systematic or earnest effort to instruct Hawaiian youth in the medical art. The knowledge that is necessary to be acquired to make a skillful and thoroughly competent practitioner is not to be obtained in this country, which as yet, does not possess medical schools and colleges, and the difficulties in the way of sending Hawaiian pupils abroad to obtain a medical education, are so various and insurmountable, as almost to preclude any hope of being overcome. Continue reading

The function of warships, 1856.

[Found under: “Ka Hoku Loa o Hawaii”]

What is the nature of a warship [Manuwa]?—Is it something that destroys? It is supplied with weapons of war to bring punishment upon the unethical [kolohe] lands who act unethically towards the land to whom the ship belongs. It is something that protects those who go to foreign lands to Trade, so that the way of life and trade there is protected. That is its main purpose when there is no war. Let us not be mistaken, it is something that brings destruction. Like a proper chief, it brings protection to the land, and it punishes those who are unethical in that it makes them afraid to overthrow righteousness; that is a proper warship. Continue reading

On working together to accomplish a task that a few cannot do alone, 1866.

Work together.

“E alu like, work together” is what a man said to his grandchildren, as he greatly desired for them to work in the manner of the title of this outlook, saying, All the time you do things, work together, help one another. Look at a carriage with four driving horses; they all help each other, pulling all in one direction; that way the carriage moves quickly. If the horses did not pull in unison, then it is clear, the carriage will not go. Therefore, O Young ones, work together and help one another. Continue reading

Passing of Charles Pelenui Mahi, 1944.

Passed On, He has Gone

We had no clue that the Angel of death was so close to the door of the bodily home of one of the finest fathers, that being our friend, Charles P. Mahi. The English messenger of Hilo announced that he left this worldly life.

Because of our fondness for the character of this fine father, we therefore publish a little thing so that the multitudes may know of the true nature of this father. Continue reading

Things were looking grim for Hawaiian language, 1906.

Do Not Forsake Your Mother Tongue

The native language of a people, like the Hawaiian Language for the Hawaiian lahui, is called the mother tongue of the Hawaiians. From what we know, how many Hawaiian youths educated in our High Schools and outside as well are truly well-supplied in knowledge and are skilled in the mother tongue of their land of birth?

We see these days that are going by, the children are grasping English, while they really have no desire to seek out the native tongue of their land of birth. It is very clear that because the Hawaiian language government schools have been put to an end, the large water sources [poo wai] that fed into all the water ditches [auwai] of knowledge in that language for the youth of Hawaii nei have closed up.  Continue reading

Rich treated differently? 1881.

WHAT IS WITH THIS?

This past Sunday, the steamer “City of Sydney” arrive in this port, and aboard was the millionaire Spreckels [Ona Miliona] from San Francisco. He came to visit his property here in Hawaii nei. But this Tuesday, he boarded the Likelike and sailed for Kulaokamaomao without being quarantined as per our quarantine law. What is with this? Is this action by the Minister of the Interior [Kuhina Kalaiaina, H. A. P. Carter] to let him go unequally? Continue reading

Notice calling for help to bury the dead, 1853.

NO. 5.—NOTICE.

WHEREAS, much difficulty is found in procuring aid to bury the dead, the Royal Commissioners of the Public Health hereby give notice that all able-bodied men, if recovered from the Small Pox, or already completely exposed thereto, are liable to be called on by them, by their Sub-Commissioners, by the Police, or by any of their agents, to render assistance in burying the dead, without remuneration. Any person so called on, refusing to assist, shall be liable to a fine, not exceeding 25 dollars, or imprisonment not exceeding six months. Continue reading

Spread of the flu on Kauai, 1919.

THE SICKNESS IS RAMPANT IN MAKAWELI, KAUAI.

From the news of the past 27th of this month, it reported of the great spread of the Spanish sickness [Spanish flu] at the Sugar Plantation of Makaweli on Kauai, and the number of those who contracted this sickness reached five hundred people, rising sharply every day. And twelve died of this sickness and pneumonia. Continue reading