Words of advice from a concerned Hawaiian, 1944.

SINGING HAWAIIAN SONGS

Editor The Advertiser:

As a Hawaiian I enjoy listening to the sweet Hawaiian music on my radio from 7:30 a.m. to midnight. But I agree with many other Hawaiians who I have heard complain about our young peoples singing nowadays. Perhaps there might be a way to help these young generation and also the future generations keep up the proper way of singing our beloved Hawaiian songs and not to murder them or change them as they are being changed by jazzing or perhaps boogle them. Why not keep them as the composer intended to express their feelings. For example the song, “Kahuahuai.” It is not a war chant. It’s a love song telling of their love for each other and how they had weathered the cold together among the fragranted ferns, etc. Continue reading

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Memorial of Protest from the women of Hilo, 1898.

KUE MEMORIALA.

O makou o na Komite o ka Ahahui Aloha Aina o na Wahine i kohoia e ka halawai i noho ma ka la 29 o Sepatemaba 1898, ma Hilo Taona.

Ma keia ke kue loa aku nei i ka Memoriala a ka Ahahui Kuwaena o ka Ahahui Aloha Aina o na Wahine o Honolulu, malalo o na kumu kupono. Continue reading

From the Ahahui Aloha Aina Kuwaena o na Wahine, 1898.

THE UMBILICAL CORD OF THE SIBLINGS ARE CUT.

This is something we made known from the very beginning, during the days when the tender-eyed ladies of the Women’s Central Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina Kuwaena o na Wahine] were drawing away [huki laweau]; when their kindling was not placed where the flames were burning, and now we received by way of the Kinau on Saturday night, that the Women’s Patriotic League of Hilo requested to dissolve their membership under the Women’s Central Patriotic League here in Honolulu; they, who we restrained from the beginning, not to do what the majority of the nation does not want, and here is the result; the umbilical cords of the siblings are cut, by way of a Memorial from there, and that is what is below, so that it is seen by everyone without fail.

(Aloha Aina, 10/8/1898, p. 3)

AlohaAina_10_8_1898_3

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 41, Aoao 3. Okatoba 8, 1898.

Stephen Reynolds supports education of half-castes, 1847.

[COMMUNICATED.]

Mrs. Gummer’s School.—On Monday last an examination of Mrs. Gummer’s scholars took place at the residence of Stephen Reynolds, Esquire, Consul for the city of Bremen. This gentleman has for years distinguished himself as the active benefactor of children belonging to the class familiarly known as half-castes. It was he who first suggested the idea of a school to Mrs. Gummer, in which children of that class and of whites should be received indiscriminately. The preliminary difficulties to its establishment were overcome, mainly, through his exertions and the perseverance of Mrs. Gummer. Continue reading

Expulsion from Ahuimanu College, 1876.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Ahuimanu College—Published in our paper last week was a letter written by some of the boys of that school, pertaining to the boarding, the education, and the work at that school. This week, we report that the tree and the fruit was seen. The words in the paper were taken to each student, and they were asked, “Are the words in our newspaper true?” Those who said yes were expelled, Continue reading