Fishponds seen on travels around Molokai, 1893.

[Found under: “Huakai Makaikai i ka Mokupuni o Molokainui a Hina.”]

FISHPONDS.

When I travelled from Kawela to Pukoo, it was perhaps ten or so miles, I saw 30 or more fishponds [loko ia] in the ocean, set apart by rock walls like the ponds at Kualoa, Koolau, Oahu. Some of the ponds I saw were almost a mile long. They [the walls] were five feet tall and four feet wide. Continue reading

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“He make no ka ka haole, a he ola no hoi; pela no na Kahuna Hawaii.” 1872.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

LET ALL MEN know the thoughts of the Hawaiian Medical Practitioners [Kahuna Lapaau Hawaii], they who number one hundred and fifty. O Ke Au Okoa, speak their thoughts. About how we will bear this immense right of ours impeccably, without deceit. Let them be instructed to put behind these evil thing: evil sorcery [anaana], imitative magic [hoopiopio], sending spirits [hoounauna], and the deification of all evil things; Continue reading

Aloha is a reciprocal thing, 1779, 1867 and beyond.

[From: S. M. Kamakau’s “Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I: Ke Au ia Kalaniopuu A. D. 1779. No ka Make ana o Kapena Kuke, Oia Hoi o Lono.”]

Kalaniopuu treated Captain Cook generously, and gave him pigs, taro, sweet potato, bananas, and other things; he also gave him ahuula capes, mahiole, kahili, feather lei, fine wooden bowls, various fine kapa, ahu ao mats from Puna, and garments of hinalo—Captain Cook gave Kalaniopuu some rubbish—(It is said that the hat that Captain Cook gave to Kalaniopuu is in the head of the kaai of Keaweikekahialiiokamoku.)

(Kuokoa, 2/2/1867, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VI, Helu 5, Aoao 1. Feberuari 2, 1867.

Let’s move forward, and not backward. 1897.

[Found under: “KE ALEALE NEI KA WAI.”]

All the while the circle of annexationists are reviling the Asians, they majority of them are employing those people as servants. How are you being deceived of the truth of their desires, O United States of America? What hypocrites!

(Makaainana, 2/8/1897, p. 4)

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Ka Makaainana, Buke VII—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 8, 1897.

Pressured by their teachers, 1893.

THE SCHOOLS OF SAINT LOUIS AND KAMEHAMEHA.

We were told that the students of Saint Louis School [ke Kula o Sana Lui] were prohibited from placing the ribbon of the annexationists upon their chests. And we were also informed that the students of Kamehameha

Continue reading

Hannah Baker in Hilo starting Hawaiian quilting clubs, 1941.

A FINE THING FOR HAWAIIAN MOTHERS

Here in Hilo is Mrs. Hannah Baker now, and she established some Hawaiian Quilting Associations. The first of her Associations was established at the YWCA Building and the second in Keaukaha.

From what was said, there are many who joined these clubs because they were interested in how to quilt Hawaiian blankets, and others perhaps because they wanted to obtain the knowledge of how to cut patterns of all sorts. Continue reading

Remarks on the state of the United States.

Some newspapers are trouncing the Captain and Clerk of the steamboat Globe for refusing a seat at their breakfast table to Haalilio, Embassador from the King of the Hawaiian or Sandwich Islands to this Government—the said Envoy laboring under the original sin of being copper-colored. Of course, the steamboat men were wrong—but was it indeed their fault, or that of a diseased public opinion—a ridiculous and disgraceful popular prejudice? Suppose this Haalilio had been a mulatto native of the United States—a free voter and ‘sovereign’ of this Country—the son, for instance, of our late Vice President—these same papers would probably have abused the Captain if he had given him a seat at the common table, and even stigmatized the passengers for consenting to eat with him! And why is not a cleanly and well-bred American freeman as good as a Sandwich Island dignitary?—There is no Country on earth where Social Aristocracy is more exclusive and absurd than here, and the less manhood a person has the more he plumes himself on his external and factitious advantages over some one whom he tries hard to look down upon.

[It sounds like things really have not changed so much.]

(New York Daily Tribune, 1/28/1843, p. 2)

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The New York Daily Tribune, Volume II, Number 250, Page 2. January 28, 1843.