Expulsion from Ahuimanu College, 1876.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Ahuimanu College—Published in our paper last week was a letter written by some of the boys of that school, pertaining to the boarding, the education, and the work at that school. This week, we report that the tree and the fruit was seen. The words in the paper were taken to each student, and they were asked, “Are the words in our newspaper true?” Those who said yes were expelled, Continue reading

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Clarence A. Crozier did not like what he saw on Niihau, 1946.

Isolation Of Niihau Is Blasted

(Additional Story on Page 2)

The pall of isolation that has made Niihau a forbidden island will be torn asunder if Santor Clarence A. Crozier, Maui, has his way.

A member of a senatorial party which visited the island Tuesday, Senator Crozier did not like what he saw and promised to do something about it.

“Niihau, which has been preserved for three generations by the Robinson family as a last refuge of primitive Hawaii, is 80 years behind the times,” Senator Crozier said.

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Rev. Ella Wise Harrison visits Niihau, 1946.

Rebuttal.

Due to what was spread some time ago about Niihau people, like the Committee selected to watch Niihau. Those committees returned and submitted their report.

Rev. Ella Wise Harrison, the kahu of the Akua Ola Church, left for Niihau and spent three weeks there with family and friends. Continue reading

Suggests back a suggestion to Maui News, 1903.

We do not need any of your sarcasm, Mr. Man of the Maui News. It may have been well meant, yet we fail to see it in that light, for “scholarly” we do not claim to be, but surely, we are “scholarly” as far as our own mother tongue is concerned, which is something that you, aged malihini, cannot touch nor express yourself upon.

Continue reading

For those who believe anything on Facebook. 1908.

That letter from Kalawao.

The English article that was printed in one of the English newspapers of Honolulu nei, from S. K. Maialoha of Kalawao, Molokai, is clear to the editor of this paper, that it is not a letter written in English by S. K. Maialoha, because the editor of this paper is familiar with S. K. Maialoha, and he is not someone skilled in English. Continue reading

Makee Aupuni responds to that Mrs. W. Hall, 1893.

That Minneapolis Letter.

Editor Bulletin:—

It is not easy to realize the fact that any woman having an atom of regard for that high sense of honor of which truth is the basis could pen such a letter as you published on Saturday, even though it were not intended, as may be supposed, for publication. Is this Mrs. W. Hall, who now traduces the Queen, in innuendo too utterly vile and baseless for repetition, the same Mrs. W. Hall who for years has been the seeming friend of the Queen, and members of the same religious organization? The public will remember that about a year and a half ago the W. C. T. U. [Women’s Christian Temperance Union], of which Mrs. W. Hall is a leading light, conceived the brilliant idea of opening a coffee-shop in the Queen Emma Hall. The enterprise was ushered in with a great flourish of religious trumpets and the usual benedictions were pronounced on the undertaking, and the creme de la creme of local “Christian business men promised to boom up the good work. But, lo, there are expenses confronting the ladies of the “Union” in starting the movement and to whom do they go? Not to the millionaire merchants their husbands and others, but to the Queen. Yes, to Queen Liliuokalani, gentle reader in Minneapolis, did Mrs. W. Hall and her sisters of the Honolulu W. C. T. U. go for the fifty-two dollars for the license, and the gift of a bag of Kona coffee and other incidentals necessary to the starting of that enterprise which was to do so much for temperance and didn’t; for after having flickered through a feeble existence of four or five months the Queen’s bag of coffee gave out, and the “movement” ceased to  move, and the word “closed” was written on the front door of the “enterprise,” and the Queen’s money might have been as well thrown into the sea, and the only residue of this coffee episode is a reminder that between pious temperance and professional missionary the kaleidoscopic picture of “Christian” character as presented by the latest local doctrinaires must appear to the Hawaiian “very pronounced” indeed, as a compound variety of intolerance, hypocrisy and unmitigated greed. Continue reading