Chicken fight, 1939.

Apprehended

When cargo ships from the Matson Shipping Company make a stop here in Hilo, there is always a shipment of some boxes of chickens that are brought ashore. When they are brought to the place where they are cared for in the American Railway Express Office, there is not just one box of chickens or just one chicken, but there are  many boxes of chickens with about four chickens per box. These chickens that are being sent are only fighting chickens. They are chickens with fine feathers; most are dark red [ulahiwa]. Continue reading

A new Hawaiian language newspaper to be printed on Kauai? 1909.

A NEW HAWAIIAN NEWSPAPER

In the office of the Attorney White [John D. White] of Kauai, announced was the idea to publish a Hawaiian newspaper for the Sun-Snatching Island [Kauai], however, the name of the newspaper to be published was no revealed.

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Medical treatment 100 years ago, 1920.

THE POOR SICK

While we were in the Office of the County Attorney [Loio Kalana] of Hawaii, a poor Hawaiian Mother appeared with her weakly daughter, and she expressed to the County Attorney of Hawaii. Because of the debility of her daughter, the daughter was in Hilo Hospital for forty days, and when she got a little better, she was discharged even if we could see that the young girl had not conquered her wasting away from sickness. Continue reading

Continuation of Theodore Kelsey’s lament, 1948.

A Hawaiian Lament
By THEODORE KELSEY
II

A little seaward of this forbidden domain the face of the father valley-ridge is sadly disfigured by a large quarrying scar, obliterating the interesting light-colored formation of Ka Upena a Maui—Demi-god Maui’s Fishnet.

Continuing down the road a short distance we come to the place where, on the upper side, the large sacred rock of Kane-hoa-lani has been split up. Continue reading

Mail delivery in Kona, 1869.

Pertaining to the Letter Carriers in Kona.

I have great praise for the work of the Letter Carriers from Kealakekua to  Waiohinu; great as well is my praise for the vigilance of the people of South Kona in regard to their Letters and Newspapers. At each group of houses [kauhale] all the way to Manuka, there is a Mail Box on the side of the rode, and it is there that the Letters that the kamaaina want to send are left, and it is there too that Letter Carrier leaves the Letters and Newspapers for that place. There are perhaps twenty Mail Boxes on that road. This is as per the decree of the Postmaster General [Luna Leta Nui], to carry the Letter Bag partially empty, delivering and picking up at each group of houses. This happened within this year in South Kona. But in North Kona, this is not happening, and perhaps in other places as well. Continue reading