Double wedding at the home of Samuel Parker, Minister of Foreign Affairs, 1892.

Double Wedding.

At the hour of 11 in the midday, April 26, at the festooned residence here in Honolulu nei of His Excellency [ka Mea Mahalo ia] Samuel Parker, Minister of Foreign Affairs, joined together by Rev. A. Mackintosh were Charles Maguire and Miss Mary H. Parker, the first born of the Minister, honored by the groomsman and bridesmaid [ku aoao], Palmer Woods and Miss Kamakee Cummins. At the same time and place, by that same pastor, Mr. Robert R. Hind Jr. and Miss Hannah Low were joined together, honored by the groomsman and bridesmaid, William Wright and Miss Hassinger. Amongst those who came to witness this distinguished marriage were the Alii the Queen, Continue reading

J. W. H. Isaac Kiha report from Puuanahulu, 1921.

NEWS OF PUUANAHULU

The ever-shining Hoku of beloved Hawaii. The famous Editor and the outstanding skilled metal-type team. Much esteem!

Christmas day has gone with its wondrous nature, and gone too are the first whirling blustery winds of Christmas and the drenching raindrops. Continue reading

More on Aunty Elizabeth from Bishop Museum’s post today, 1959.

‘Aunty Elizabeth,’ Kalakaua Ave. Lei-Seller, Dies

Another familiar face in the fast-changing Waikiki scenery passed from view Saturday with the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hoopii Delovio—”Aunty Elizabeth” to thousands.

The 54-year-old woman and two others were the first to set up a lei stand in Waikiki some 35 years ago. Continue reading

More on the prayer of Rev. Akaiko Akana, 1920.

An Official Prayer From Hawaii

PROCEEDINGS of the House of Representatives were opened the other day by the Rev. Akaiko Akana, chaplain of the Senate of Hawaii, in a prayer of rather unusual character. He quoted Kipling and referred to ancient nations which, before the discovery of this country, “had risen skyward in the splendor of their accomplishment and in the glory of their might, but because God was forgotten, they fell and today the remnants of their broken structures lie heaped upon the ruins of their desolation with their names buried beneath and spelled in cold letters on the pages of history.” This is a fine piece of rhetoric addressed to the Throne on High, but intended for human ears, and it evokes many memories of the Western world. Continue reading

Akaiko Akana offers prayer before the Congress of the United States, 1921.

HAWAIIAN PASTOR GIVES PRAYER

In a letter from Princess Elizabeth Kalanianaole from Washington received by Mrs. Julia Desha reported that the Rev. Akaiko Akana was requested by the Speaker of the House of Representatives in Washington to give the opening prayer on a morning when the proceedings of the House of Representatives were opened, and that solemn voice of prayer given by the Hawaiian Pastor was listened carefully to by the distinguished Members of that Body. This was a great honor given to the Kahu of the Kawaiahao Church, and it was the very first time the first words of prayer given by a Hawaiian Pastor was heard in that world-renown Legislative Building. Continue reading