Lae Ahi, Leahi, Daimana Hila, uhe uhene, 1877.

[Found under: “Na Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Lae Ahi vs. Leahi—This is a question to the our oldsters of Hawaii, what is the correct name which we are calling Daimana Hila [Diamond Head]? Is it Lae Ahi or Leahi perhaps? Reply quickly with the correct answer.  Ninau. Continue reading

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“Eia o Awini pali alii hulaana,” 1924.

[Found under: “Hiamoe o Kamaka Stillman Iloko o ka Maha”]

The mele below is one of the things which proves that Kamehameha was raised by Kahaopulani and that he was raised at Awini, thus:

Eia o Awini pali alii hulaana,
E noho ana Kahaopulani,
Hanai ia Paiea he alii,
I kohola maloko Kekuiapoiwa, Continue reading

Genealogy of Kahaopulani, 1911.

CORRECTION OF GENEALOGY

This is a reprinting of the genealogy of Kahaopulani, the royal caretaker who raised Kamehameha I. at Awini; and so that the number of children given birth by Kamaka Stillman in a direct line, and not just one daughter as was shown in the earlier printing in Issue 19, Volume II of Ke Au Hou, May 10, 1911: Continue reading

Kamaka Stillman refutes the story about Naeole raising Kamehameha, 1911.

A Response by “O-u-ka-maka-o-ka-wauke-oi-opiopio.”

Mr. Editor of Ke Au Hou:

With appreciation:—Please allow me my clarification pertaining to the one who raised Kamehameha I that was shown in the newspaper “Kuokoa Home Rula” on the 10th of February past, 1911, which said that it was Naeole. But forgive me for the tardiness of my response, for I soon received my issue of that paper mentioned above from a friend last week, and in order that the actual person who raised Kamehameha I is made known, that it is not Naeole as is being stated, that is why I am publishing this without intent to elevate chiefly genealogy, for the rude statements are embarrassing; there are so many people who are associated with alii, and covetous of alii who have genealogies that are printed in books. Pertaining to the parentage of Kamehameha, here it is: Continue reading

Giant Powder is not only bad for the environment, 1882.

DIED WHILE GATHERING FISH USING GIANT POWDER.

Please accept my bundle that I put before you, and it shall be you that will give it your all out amongst the public so that our friends who enjoy news will know about it, from the rising sun at Haehae to Lehua where the sun is held back and done. And this is it: Continue reading

Fishing using explosives, 1895.

The Blasting of Fish Prevails.

Mr. Editor:

On the travels of the Circuit Court Judge of Maui, to Kaupo, Kipahulu, Hana, and all the way to the Koolau cliffs of Maui, to ask for money for the building of Wailuku, and we were lucky in what money was collected. I was one who went along on this journey. When we reached Kipahulu, to Hakuole’s place, a policeman, with his son, Kimo Hakuole who is a school teacher; the locals were very hospitable. Continue reading

54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading