Hula painting by Cogswell found in California, 1939.

Cogswell’s Model: J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., is anxious to know if the Hawaiian girl who posed for this painting by William Cogswell in 1892 is still living in Hawaii.—Star-Bulletin photo.

Rare Old Painting Found By Phillips in California

Another one of the works of William Cogswell, whose paintings of King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani are hung in Iolani palace, was discovered by J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., during his recent business trip to the coast. Continue reading

Advertisements

Where are these ten hula paintings? 1893.

HULA DANCE ON CANVAS.

A Series of Pictures of Native Hawaiians on Exhibition.

W. Cogswell, a well-known portrait-painter on the Pacific Coast, has on exhibition at the artrooms of Sanborn, Vall & Co. a series of ten pictures of native Hawaiians in their historical dance. Mr. Cogswell has been in Honolulu for the past two years Continue reading

Hula graduation [uniki] in Kahakuloa, Maui, 1875.

[Found under: “NO KE KALANA O KAHAKULOA A ME KONA MAU HIOHIONA.”]

Mixed-up news. On this 12th of June, there was a feast loudly given for a uniki for the hula uliuli, under the leadership of a youth, William Kamalahea; he is from the land of the Kilioopu wind, and he taught some from this District the hula uliuli, Continue reading

Hawaiians abroad and more criticism of the hula group I posted articles about a couple weeks ago, 1862.

[Found under: “Na Palapala.”]

A Letter

FROM OUR REPRESENTATIVE WHO RECENTLY WENT TO CALIFORNIA.

O Editor: From when I arrived here in California, I met with a few Hawaiians who I thought were here in California. And perhaps their friends will not fail to be happy to hear about them.

The first is William Kanui [Wiliama Kanui]. I wrote about him in the Hoku Loa some weeks ago. He is one who came back from Boston with Bingham folks in the year 1820. He arrived in California in the year 1849. He sought after money and he found it, and it disappeared once more. He lives as a Christian in California. In the past rainy season, he was very ill, and is a little better now; however, he is weakly because of his age. His hair is very gray, and his skin is fair from just living like a haole. He very much cannot fend for himself, and he is cared for by the Christian friends of the Bethel of Sacramento in San Francisco, in all his needs. Continue reading

Five hula schools in Heeia, 1876.

[Found under: “NA ANOAI.”]

Hula in Heeia.—There are five Hawaiian hula schools [pa hula Hawaii] here in this area under the leadership of five teachers, whose names are: Iopa from Iolekaa; Ioane Kaaiai from Ho-i; Laeula from Kealohi; Kanuku at the house of Kalei at Kikiwelawela, the teacher is from Manoa; at the house of Kaili is under the responsibility of C. Barenaba; Continue reading

Hula at Laie Maloo, 1876.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

In the evening of the 8th of this month, there was Hawaiian hula performed here in Laie Maloo by some kumu, they being Kiaimakani (m) and Kekulani (f), and their students were Kahinu (f) and Kalo (f), the two of them being girls. There were many who went to see this foolish act. This began at 3 o’clock or a little after; and at 5 p.m., the deputy arrived and proclaimed in a loud voice, like this: Continue reading

Latest from Waikapu, 1875.

[Found under: Na mea hou o na Waieha.”]

Pertaining to Waikapu.—On the 1st of August of this year, the Congregation of Waikapu decided to work on their church immediately, and these are the main things. The old church, to extend the stone walls 4 feet higher, and to arch the windows, and to fix the cracks in the stone walls. The carpenter that will do this is Ninihua; he says that the church will be completed for $2,300, and it is with this that the building will be complete along with his pay. According the this carpenter, with this money the church and the bell tower will be completed.

There are two Hawaiian hula houses in Waikapu; those who join in the hula are church members as well as non-church members. Many go to those houses, but the truly devout, they do not go. That is what I see when I visited this place, the land famous for the Kololio wind.

[This is part of a longer description by a person calling himself, Mose Malihinihele, of Honolulu.]

(Lahui Hawaii, 8/18/1875, p. 2)

LahuiHawaii_8_18_1875_2

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 34, Aoao 2. Augate 19, 1875.