Captain Samuel Mana, 1900.

A MAN WHO PERSEVERES AT HIS OCCUPATION

CAPTAIN SAMUEL MANA IS ADMIRED

KAPENA SAMUEL MANA.

Sam Mana is one of the Hawaiians who is employed in the Sailing Profession as a Captain, and he is the only one among us who has been at it from a very long time ago, and because of his fortitude, he has been promoted by his foremen, and has now become the Captain of the ship the Concord. Continue reading

Hawaiians who died at sea, 1858.

People who died on ships. Mahoe, aboard the ship “Baltic.” Kalua fell from that ship and died in the ocean, on the 8th of May.

On the 22nd of June, Nahau died aboard the ship “Corea.” C. S. Bartow Esq. was who reported this.

(Hae Hawaii, 12/1/1858, p. 138)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 3, Ano Hou,—Helu 35. Dekemaba 1, 1858.

Mrs. Elizabeth Kahele Nahaolelua to return home, 1897.

RETURNING.

Aboard the Australia of this past Tuesday, there was a letter received by the family and friends of Mrs. Kahele Nahaolelua, Queen Liliuokalani’s lady-in-waiting [mea lawelawe], on Her [the Queen’s] voyage to seek what is right for Her people, who is staying in Washington; saying that she [Nahaolelua] is returning because of her illness, Continue reading

Kamehameha II and Kamamalu return aboard the British ship Blonde on May 4, 1825.

Remembrances.

On the 22nd of May in the year 1824, King Liholiho and his attendants landed in Portsmouth, England. On the 26th [of May] of that same year, Kaumualii, the King of Kauai, died at Honolulu, and Lahaina is where he was buried. Continue reading

More on the prayer of Rev. Akaiko Akana, 1920.

An Official Prayer From Hawaii

PROCEEDINGS of the House of Representatives were opened the other day by the Rev. Akaiko Akana, chaplain of the Senate of Hawaii, in a prayer of rather unusual character. He quoted Kipling and referred to ancient nations which, before the discovery of this country, “had risen skyward in the splendor of their accomplishment and in the glory of their might, but because God was forgotten, they fell and today the remnants of their broken structures lie heaped upon the ruins of their desolation with their names buried beneath and spelled in cold letters on the pages of history.” This is a fine piece of rhetoric addressed to the Throne on High, but intended for human ears, and it evokes many memories of the Western world. Continue reading

Akaiko Akana offers prayer before the Congress of the United States, 1921.

HAWAIIAN PASTOR GIVES PRAYER

In a letter from Princess Elizabeth Kalanianaole from Washington received by Mrs. Julia Desha reported that the Rev. Akaiko Akana was requested by the Speaker of the House of Representatives in Washington to give the opening prayer on a morning when the proceedings of the House of Representatives were opened, and that solemn voice of prayer given by the Hawaiian Pastor was listened carefully to by the distinguished Members of that Body. This was a great honor given to the Kahu of the Kawaiahao Church, and it was the very first time the first words of prayer given by a Hawaiian Pastor was heard in that world-renown Legislative Building. Continue reading

The return of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1920.

SHE IS RETURNING

This coming Friday, the Matsonia will stop in Hilo nei, and aboard that Californian Steamship returns Mrs. Aima Nawahi and her family, after spending several months in the State of California. The readers of the Hoku have been blessed by the kindness of this Hawaiian Matriarch in sending some news of their travels in that famous State of California, and in this issue, some news of this travel is published. Continue reading

Oliver H. Kapau, Clarence J. Olds, and James Akana Ai off to Georgia, 1927.

THREE OF NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS HERE TO INFANTRY SCHOOL

Three members of the Hawaii national guard (298th Infantry), will go to Fort Benning, Ga., to attend the infantry school which will be held at that post from February 28 to May 28, according to orders received from the secretary of war by Col. Percy M. Smoot, commandant. They are Capt. Oliver H. Kapau, Capt. Clarence J. Olds and Master Sgt. James Akana Ai. Continue reading

Stephen L. Desha reflects on the death of Stephen William Kekuewa, 1920.

REV. S. W. KEKUEWA HAS PASSED ON

Rev. Stephen William Kekuewa let go of this life at 4 o’clock in the afternoon of this past Wednesday, Nov. 3, 1920, and let go of this worldly life at the home of his beloved daughter, Mrs. John P. Kupua, on North School Street, in Honolulu. Continue reading