Hawaiian woman returns from Europe after many years away, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Hawaiian Woman in Europe.–Early morning on this past Thursday, Kahula (woman) returned from Germany, on the foreign Laura & Louise. She lived many years away from her home lands; she left perhaps in 1857. She said she went to America, Britain, Germany, and her life was comfortable, living with her employers, that being L. H. Anthon, Esq. (Luika), that foreign language speaking haole who lived in Hawaii before.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1862, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Okatoba 25, 1862.

Joseph Puni writes to the father of Diamond Kekona, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN.

Opera House,
Dudley, England,
Nov. 4, 1916.

To my true friend, Dick Kekona,

Aloha oe:–Perhaps you are surprised receiving this letter. I have tried all means to release your beloved son Diamond from the British armed forces. I appeared before the American Consul in the countryside here in England, telling them that Diamond is an American. They responded that they will put my request before the head consul in London. On the 17th of September, I went to the Consulate in London, they told me that the consul could not order the British government to release Diamond because he is 25 years old; only those below 20 years old, if they are American citizens. These past days, I decided to have your daughter-in-law (Amy Kekona) to come to see me, and get together with her to think of a way to release her husband; for these good reasons, I ask that you send me his birth certificate, or to go to the governor of Hawaii to write to the Hawaiian Delegate Mr. J. K. Kalanianaole in Washington D. C., to go to the State Department in Washington and have the American Ambassador in London investigate the circumstances of his enlisting in the armed forces, and you verify that your first-born son is a true Hawaiian. He had a document in the city of Paris, France, from the office of the American General, written on the 13th of February, 1914, attesting to the fact that he is a Hawaiian. If he finds these documents, he will be victorious. Do not neglect this, for I am still regretful not having his acting. He has much knowledge in this area, and his showing this to the world would bring fame to the Hawaiian Lahui. I will organize everything here and send it to London. With our sleuthing, I believe everything will progress; may God watch over and keep safe the life of your child until we meet again, amen.

With aloha to your family and the Hawaiian Nation.

JOSEPH PUNI.

Write me at your daughter-in-law’s, c/o 143 Baxter Ave., Kidderminister, England.

(Aloha Aina, 1/19/1917, p. 3)

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 3, Aoao 3. Ianuari 19, 1917.

Too much news today, 1880.

Knowledge Seeking Youths.

We received letters from the youths who traveled in search of knowledge. They are in the city of Cincinnati, State of Ohio, on the past 9th to the 16th of September. They tell of how their travels are going well, the beauty of everything, and their joy and that they are full of hope. We want to tell everything in full pertaining to these Hawaiian youths, but our paper is full, therefore wait for another when we receive letters from them again.

[These youths are Robert Wilcox, James Booth, and William Boyd.]

(Elele Poakolu, 10/6/1880, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke I, Helu 5, Aoao 5. Okatoba 6, 1880.

Henry Grube Marchant, 1893.

Henry Grube is heading back to the land of his birth. He was sent to increase his knowledge in engraving. And it seems that next month, October, is when it is believed that he will return home.

[Henry Grube Marchant was one of the youths sent abroad to Boston to learn engraving as part of King Kalakaua’s Education of Hawaiian Youths in Foreign Countries.]

(Lei Momi, 8/28/1893, p. 3)

Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Augate 28, 1893.

Wailaahia travels to China with her husband, 1866.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”]

A Hawaiian Woman in China:—With the arrival of a trade ship from China this past Saturday, we saw a Hawaiian woman aboard. She was back in China with her husband, where they went to visit, and for her to see the land of her husband. There were many people who showed her around in Hong Kong [Honokaona], being that it was something new seeing a Hawaiian woman in those parts. What a good thing for that Hawaiian woman to see the “aina pua”* of her husband. The people probably spoke unintelligibly as her husband spoke unintelligibly back, all the while she was cut short. The name of this Hawaiian woman who went visiting is Wailaahia.

*Literally, “Flowery Kingdom,” [華國]

(Kuokoa, 10/13/1866, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 41, Aoao 2. Okatoba 13, 1866.

Aquai divorces Wailaahia, 1869.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

Whereas I have divorced my wife, whose name is

WAILAAHIA.

Therefore, I will not pay her debts from this day forth.

AQUAI.
Honolulu, Feb. 24, 1869.

(Au Okoa, 3/18/1869, p. 3)

Ke Au Okoa, Buke IV, Helu 48, Aoao 3. Maraki 18, 1869.

King Kalakaua’s Study Abroad Program, 1936.

[Found under: “E MAU ANA ANEI KA OLELO HAWAII”]

King Kalakaua Gave His Support to Educate His Lahui

While King Kalakaua was upon the throne, as a result of him speaking with his Cabinet, and also approved by the Legislature of 1882 or 1883, there were many Hawaiians who were sent to far away lands in seek of education. It feels like it happened between the years 1883 and 1884. Some of these boys went at the government’s expense, and some under the expense of the Father Missionaries.

1. Robert W. Wilcox and Robert N. Boyd, were sent to military school in Italy.

2. Matthew Makalua and Piianaia, were sent to Oxford in England, to medical school. Piianaia did not graduate, but Makaula did graduate and became a very great doctor in England. He married a woman and he had a number of children. He is dead now. He did not return to Hawaii.

Continue reading

Captain Samuel Mana, 1900.

A MAN WHO PERSEVERES AT HIS OCCUPATION

CAPTAIN SAMUEL MANA IS ADMIRED

KAPENA SAMUEL MANA.

Sam Mana is one of the Hawaiians who is employed in the Sailing Profession as a Captain, and he is the only one among us who has been at it from a very long time ago, and because of his fortitude, he has been promoted by his foremen, and has now become the Captain of the ship the Concord. Continue reading

Hawaiians who died at sea, 1858.

People who died on ships. Mahoe, aboard the ship “Baltic.” Kalua fell from that ship and died in the ocean, on the 8th of May.

On the 22nd of June, Nahau died aboard the ship “Corea.” C. S. Bartow Esq. was who reported this.

(Hae Hawaii, 12/1/1858, p. 138)

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 3, Ano Hou,—Helu 35. Dekemaba 1, 1858.

Mrs. Elizabeth Kahele Nahaolelua to return home, 1897.

RETURNING.

Aboard the Australia of this past Tuesday, there was a letter received by the family and friends of Mrs. Kahele Nahaolelua, Queen Liliuokalani’s lady-in-waiting [mea lawelawe], on Her [the Queen’s] voyage to seek what is right for Her people, who is staying in Washington; saying that she [Nahaolelua] is returning because of her illness, Continue reading