More on the prayer of Rev. Akaiko Akana, 1920.

An Official Prayer From Hawaii

PROCEEDINGS of the House of Representatives were opened the other day by the Rev. Akaiko Akana, chaplain of the Senate of Hawaii, in a prayer of rather unusual character. He quoted Kipling and referred to ancient nations which, before the discovery of this country, “had risen skyward in the splendor of their accomplishment and in the glory of their might, but because God was forgotten, they fell and today the remnants of their broken structures lie heaped upon the ruins of their desolation with their names buried beneath and spelled in cold letters on the pages of history.” This is a fine piece of rhetoric addressed to the Throne on High, but intended for human ears, and it evokes many memories of the Western world. Continue reading

Akaiko Akana offers prayer before the Congress of the United States, 1921.

HAWAIIAN PASTOR GIVES PRAYER

In a letter from Princess Elizabeth Kalanianaole from Washington received by Mrs. Julia Desha reported that the Rev. Akaiko Akana was requested by the Speaker of the House of Representatives in Washington to give the opening prayer on a morning when the proceedings of the House of Representatives were opened, and that solemn voice of prayer given by the Hawaiian Pastor was listened carefully to by the distinguished Members of that Body. This was a great honor given to the Kahu of the Kawaiahao Church, and it was the very first time the first words of prayer given by a Hawaiian Pastor was heard in that world-renown Legislative Building. Continue reading

The return of Emma Aima Nawahi, 1920.

SHE IS RETURNING

This coming Friday, the Matsonia will stop in Hilo nei, and aboard that Californian Steamship returns Mrs. Aima Nawahi and her family, after spending several months in the State of California. The readers of the Hoku have been blessed by the kindness of this Hawaiian Matriarch in sending some news of their travels in that famous State of California, and in this issue, some news of this travel is published. Continue reading

Oliver H. Kapau, Clarence J. Olds, and James Akana Ai off to Georgia, 1927.

THREE OF NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS HERE TO INFANTRY SCHOOL

Three members of the Hawaii national guard (298th Infantry), will go to Fort Benning, Ga., to attend the infantry school which will be held at that post from February 28 to May 28, according to orders received from the secretary of war by Col. Percy M. Smoot, commandant. They are Capt. Oliver H. Kapau, Capt. Clarence J. Olds and Master Sgt. James Akana Ai. Continue reading

Stephen L. Desha reflects on the death of Stephen William Kekuewa, 1920.

REV. S. W. KEKUEWA HAS PASSED ON

Rev. Stephen William Kekuewa let go of this life at 4 o’clock in the afternoon of this past Wednesday, Nov. 3, 1920, and let go of this worldly life at the home of his beloved daughter, Mrs. John P. Kupua, on North School Street, in Honolulu. Continue reading

Death of William Stephen Kekuewa, 1920.

THE REV. S. W. KEKUEWA PASSES ON

After being worn away by a debilitating illness for some time, the Rev. Stephen William Kekuewa grew weary of this life, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John P. Kapua, on School Street, at four o’clock in the afternoon, on Wednesday of this past week; and in the afternoon of this past Sunday, his remains were carried to the Maemae Cemetery.

The Rev. S. W. Kekuewa was born at Luakaha, Nuuanu, on the 25th of February, 1842, therefore when he died he was over seventy-eight years old.

During his youth, he was educated at Lahainaluna School, under his teachers, S. E. Bishop and C. B. Andrews; and for some years he lived on the island of Micronesia on a mission he was sent on by the Hawaiian Evangelical Board [Papa Hawaii].

Because the health of his wife was not good, they returned to Hawaii nei, and he served as the kahu of the chruch at  Iole, Kohala, Hawaii for many years.

Because of the letter of the members of the church of Waianae which called for him to be the kahu of that church, he left the church of Kohala and went to live at Waianae; at that church he lived and worked until he was called by his Lord, and he went to his permanent home beyond.Rev. S. W. Kekuewa was married twice; his first wife was Mrs. Miriam Kamali Kekuewa, and after  her death, he married for the second time, to Mrs. Kuewa Wharton of Waialua, Oahu.

When he left this life, he left behind a widow, and his seven children with his previous wife: David Kekuewa; John K. Kekuewa; and Stephen William Kekuewa, who is employed with the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Company [Hui Mokuahi Holo Pili Aina]; Charles Kekuewa, who is employed as a deputy warden of the City and County of Honolulu; Lily Kekuewa, the principal of the school of Puuanahulu, in North Kona, Hawaii; Mrs. John P. Kapua; and Mrs. Franco; as well as the many grandchildren.

His funeral was held in the Kaumakapili Church in the afternoon of this past Sunday, under the leadership of Rev. Henry K. Poepoe, and from there the procession moved along accompanied by family and friends of the deceased, to the cemetery of Maemae, and his remains were placed there, as the Holy Book says, earth returns to earth.

Rev. S. W. Kekuewa was one of the very old time pastors, and with his passing on to the other world, the church of Waianae is left vacant, and it will be difficult to fill his place.

(Kuokoa, 11/12/1920, p. 4)

Kuokoa_11_12_1920_4
Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 46, Aoao 4. Novemaba 12, 1920.

Death of Edward Kawaihoa Hanapi, 1930.

Edward Hanapi, Veteran County Employe, Dead

Following an illness of two years, Edward Kawaihoa Hanapi, 59, veteran county employe, died at the Queen’s hospital last night. Although ill for a long period, he was not confined to the hospital until during the last week.

Born on Molokai December 7, 1870, Hanapi would have been 60 years old next Saturday. Hanapi wad educated in the Kamehameha Schools and for many years was employed by the City and County as a record searcher. His friends in Honolulu and on the other islands are legion. Continue reading

Death of Colonel Sam Parker, 1920.

SAMUEL PARKER DEPARTS FROM THIS LIFE

Death is Victorious Over Him, Following a Long Sickness

HIS BODY RETURNED TO WAILUA IN MANA, HAWAII

Escorted by his Grandchild David Kalakaua Kawananakoa and His Family

After suffering from a stroke some years ago, Colonel Samuel Parker grew weary of this life, on the night of last Friday, at his home outside of Waikiki, and his body was returned aboard the Mauna Kea of this past Wednesday to be laid to rest in his family cemetery at Mana, Waimea, Hawaii.

When he passed on, he was 66 years old, 10 months and 12 days. Continue reading