Bird poop was a big business back in the day, 1859.

Pertaining to the Guano Islands.

O Hae Hawaii:

Aloha oe:—On the 28th of Mei, 1859, we sailed from Honolulu, six days we spent at sea, and on the seventh day, that being the 4th of June, we saw Paukeaho [Jarvis Island], which looks like a very low-lying land; living there is Kale, Livai, and 50 men, who are guano workers. There was one trade ship docked, and three buoys to secure boats to, and a fine pier to transfer the guano; Kale’s men make fast work. He has 80 men. The eighty men can produce 2,640 bags per day. There is much food and water brought from Honolulu aboard the “Josephine,” a speedy ship which makes 300 miles per day if the wind is good; if the wind is bad, 280 miles per day. Continue reading

Advertisements

Might these be the feathers the Hawaiians were wearing in Salt Lake City? 1898.

CORSETS, HATS AND JEWELRY.

Some Late Fashion Hints—Philadelphia Physician Shows Women How to Lace.

A NEW PARIS COAT.

IBIS FEATHERS.

The promises of May are already being made, and tender hearts who will not have the plumage or bodies of dead songsters in their hats can this spring trim the hats with lovely ibis feathers that cost no avian lives, and are fair to look upon. Of course the purple ibis feathers from Egypt are to be classed among the costly beauties of millinery, but we have our own American scarlet ibis to borrow tail feathers from and fix in our new wide-brimmed hats.

This delicate plumage is, however, dyed many handsome colors, and, beside this and ostrich feathers, to be safely adopted by any Audubonite, we are going to have lovely hats later on trimmed so gracefully and economically with nothing but masses of shot taffeta silk cut on the bias and every edge closely pinked. This piece silk will assume, in fact, has already largely taken the place of ribbon bows for the trimming of simpler hats. Nothing can be more alluringly daring than a sapphire blue felt, with just a yard of cerise taffeta twisted about the crown, perky bows and ends starting up in every direction. Here and there the taffeta was caught down with cheap pins set with mock sapphires and rhinestones.

Nobody yet dares to assume which ways hats are going to tilt for spring wearing, but just in this midseason a tendency is making toward piling everything in front. Thake a look, for instance, at the crowning glory on the head of the model in the braided coat. It is typical of the daring frontage now used. Here the hat brim is of modes proportions; it is the mounting black and white ostrich tips that lend the stately effect. Another hat worth mentioning boasted a brim four and one-half inches wide, and this was turned directly off the face, bent into three perpendicular flutes, and over the edge of the brim, finished by puffings of black chiffon, nodded the heavy heads of half a dozen prize tall feathers.

(Salt Lake Hearld, 1/16/1898, p. 15)

SaltLakeHerald_1_16_1898_15.png

(The Salt Lake Herald, Number 49, Page 15. January 16, 1898.

Hoapili and Kiliwehi in New Zealand, 1866.

VISIT TO THE MAORI KING MATUTAERA.

The correspondent of the Southern Cross at Waiuku sends the  following description of a visit recently paid by him to the quarters of the Maori king Matutaera, in company with two visitors from the Sandwich Islands:— Continue reading

Hui Aloha Aina o Kalawao me Kalaupapa, 1898.

[Found under: “LOKAHI IO NO KA LAHUI.”]*

Kalaupapa, Mar. 4, 1898.

Miss Lucy Peabody,
Treasurer for the Funds of the Hawaiian Delegates.

Honolulu,

Aloha oe,

We are sending by your hand thirty dollars ($30.00). That being $25.00 from the Patriotic League of Kalawao and Kalaupapa, and a $5.00 gift from the Angel Society, “Hui Anela” of Kalaupapa, with hopes that the sum reaches your hand in entirety. Continue reading

Donation from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, 1898.

ASSISTANCE FOR THE DELEGATES.

The Treasurer of the Delegates’ Funds, Miss Lucy Peabody, received from the Head Secretary of the Patriotic League [Ahahui Aloha Aina] of the Hawaiian Archipelago, fifteen dollars ($15.00) from the Patriotic League of Kalaupapa, Molokai.

[Even fifteen dollars was a great sum of money during those days.]

(Aloha Aina, 2/26/1898, p. 5)

AlohaAina_2_26_1898_5.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IV, Helu 9, Aoao 5. Feberuari 26, 1898.