More on William Kanakanui, 1934.

In Command

LT. WILLIAM KANAKANUI
on guard ship

Lt. Kanakanui To Command Guard Ship For Flight

Lieut. (jg) William Kanakanui, USN, member of a well-known kamaaina family and once-famous swimmer for Punahou and the U.S. Naval academy, was given command of the minsweeper USS Tanager this week in accordance with orders from the Navy department at Washington, D.C.

Lieut. Kanakanui will be in charge of the vessel as she takes her station far out in the Pacific as a weather reporting ship for the six navy planes scheduled to hop off for Pearl Harbor from San Francisco January 12. The Tanager will be stationed at latitude 34, longitude 150, or several hundred miles north of the planes’ route.

While at the Naval academy over a decade ago Kanakanui won national recognition as a swimmer, setting several records. He was a member of the swimming team during his four years at the Academy. He had been well known in local aquatic circles while at Punahou, where he received his prep school training.

[You should always look at all sources when doing research. You never know which newspaper will give more/different information on your subject!]

(Advertiser, 1/5/1934, p. 2)

Advertiser_1_5_1934_2

The Honolulu Advertiser, 78th Year, Number 16,858, Page 2. January 5, 1934.

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Lieutenant William Kanakanui Commands the USS Tanager, 1934.

LIEUTENANT KANAKANUI TO TAKE COMMAND OF SHIP

Given to Lieutenant William Kanakanui of the of the United States Navy, a Hawaiian boy of a kamaaina family of Honolulu nei, and a famous swimmer of Punahou School and the Naval Academy, was the lead and command of the mine sweeper of the sea, the USS Tanager, this week as per the orders of the office of war in Washington.

Lieutenant Kanakanui will take command of the ship as it is stationed far out in the Pacific Ocean as a ocean condition reporting ship for six planes known to be flying from California to Puuloa on this coming January 12.

(Alakai o Hawaii, 1/11/1934, p. 1)

AlakaioHawaii_1_11_1934_1.png

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 6, Helu 37, Aoao 1. Ianuali 11, 1934.

Hawaiian Halloween in LA, 1937.

WAIKIKI

Commencing
Saturday, Oct. 30

HAWAIIAN HALLOWE’EN
CELEBRATION–for 7 Days
–as in The Islands!

SOL HOOPII’S Orchestra

LENA MACHADO
PRINCE LEI LANI

ALOHA KAIMI Arrives from Honolulu to Join TANI MARSH in Interpretive Hulas!

NO COVER CHARGE

Hawaiian, Chinese and American
Cuisine — Special

DINNER SATURDAY $2.50
All Other Times $1.50

LA BREA AT BEVERLY               York 8183

Try a Poi Cocktail at “Noa-Noa”

(LA Times, 10/30/1937, p. 5)

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Los Angeles Times, Volume LVI. October 30, 1937, p. 5.

Patriotism, 1893.

THE PEOPLE OF HAWAII HAVE ALOHA FOR THEIR ALII.

From ancient times, from all the way into the realm of po, from early on, from the very beginning, born was the aloha of Hawaiian Men, Hawaiian Women, and the Offspring of their loins, for their Alii, all the way until this very day; it would seem that it is greater than anything else pertaining to their sovereign, and it would seem there is no greater proof than the words pronounced by our King Kauliluaikeanuwaialeale [Kalakaua], when he went on that famous trip around the world in the year 1881, and upon his treading once more upon his birth sands; this is what he stated:

KE KAENA A KA MOI KALAKAUA.

Ua kaahele au maluna o ka ilihonua me ka moana,
A Inia mamao, a me Kina kaulana,
Hoea i na aekai o Aferika, a na palena o Europa,
A halawai me ka ikaika o na aina a pau,
A ia’u i ku ai ma ka aoao o na Poo Aupuni,
Ka poe mana maluna o ka lakou ma ka hiehie Alii,
Hoomaopopo iho la i ka uku-iki, a nawaliwali o Ko’u,
Me Ko’u Nohoalii i hookahuaia maluna o kahi puu Pele,
A ma kahi o na miliona i hooko i ka keia mau Moi,
He mau tausani wale iho no malalo o Ko’u malu,
Aka, ka upu nei loko, Na’u ke Kaena hiki,
Aia he mau nani maloko o na poai o Ko’u mau aekai—
I oi aku ka makamae i ka O’u mau hoa Moi,
Aohe O’u kumu hopo maloko o Ko’u Aupuni,
He hiki ke hui me Ko’u lahui me ka weli ole,
Aohe maka’u No’u iho, me ke kiai pili-paa ole ia,
A Na’u ke Kaena, he momi i hoounaia mailuna mai Na’u—
Eia ia’u ke aloha oiaio o Ko’u Lahui.

[The first time I heard these powerful words was from a Palani Vaughan record (and looking back, I think he is one of the many reasons why this blog exists today). I heard it and thought man, that is definitely not a boast that could seriously be claimed by any other of his fellow leaders of his time (so much less by those of today). And when I first saw Kalakaua’s words restated in this article after the overthrow, it made the statement even more profound. This, by the way, was so important that they reprinted it again on 1/21/1893!

For the English version from an article right after Kalakaua’s return, click here! Learn the stories!! Pass them forward!!!]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/18/1893, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 141, Aoao 3. Ianuari 18, 1893.

English coverage of the Heen/Notley wedding, with better pictures, 1906.

POPULAR COUPLE WEDDED

MR. AND MRS. WM. H. HEEN.

An impressive ceremony at St. Andrew’s cathedral last evening united Miss Lily Notley and Mr. William H. Heen in marriage. The ceremony was performed in the presence of a large number of friends. The bride was attended by Mrs. Leslie, as matron of honor, and the groom was served by his brother, Mr. Afong Heen, as best man. Rev. F. Fitz officiated.

The church was simply decorated, a border of waxy white flowers mingled with fern leaves adorning the chancel rail. The bride was given away by her father, Mr. Charles Notley. Continue reading

Heroes, 1966.

These four boys rescued two youths from drowning in California a week ago. They are from left, Robert L. Kuhaulua, George K. Kupihe, Melvin D. Kalahiki and Robert K. Brown.—Photo by Pan American.

Isle job corpsmen save two from drowning on W. Coast

The rescue of two Santa Rosa, California, youths from drowning at Salmon Creek Beach a week ago today was told by four returning job corpsmen yesterday.

The corpsmen, who returned with 11 others from California on a Pan American plane, were Robert L. Kuhaulua, George K. Kupihe, Melvin D. Kalahiki and Robert K. Brown. Continue reading

Calendar featuring pictures of the commission who took the anti-annexation petition to D.C., 1898.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS”]

The Ka Ahailono o Hawaii has issued an Alamanach for 1898 which is adorned with the pictures of the Hawaiian anti-annexation commission now in Washington.

[This is just another thing I wish I could see. As of today, there are no extant copies found of Ahailono o Hawaii (which first appeared on 6/7/1897). Maybe one of these days, someone will come across some. Please be on the look out.]

(Independent, 1/15/1898, p. 3)

Independent_1_15_1898_3

The Independent, Volume VI, Number 790, Page 3. January 15, 1898.