Singers from Hawaiia, 1920.

SIX OF HAWAII’S FINEST MUSICIANS COMING HERE FROM ISLANDS TO PRESERVE MUSICAL IDEALS OF NATIVE LAND

Hand-Picked Company of Native Musicians in the Islands Chosen for Long Tour in United States and Canada During Present Summer—Sailed May 19th from Honolulu with Mildred Leo Clemens

Mildred Leo Clemone and Her Native Hawaiians of the Famous Waikiki Beach, April, 1920

Six of the finest native musicians in all the Hawaiian Islands sailed from Honolulu on May 19th on the steamship “Maui,” to fill their first American engagement. They will appear on the Colt Alber Premier circuit in Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky, Ohio. Continue reading

Spreading Hawaiian music and dance in America and Canada, 1920.

WILL ADVERTISE HAWAII THROUGHOUT STATES

Mildred Lee Clemens and her company of Hawaiian musicians and dancers who will sail with her on the S. S. Maui, May 19, and appear on the Colt-Alber Chautauqua Premier Circuit of the Atlantis coast and Canada, beginning June 10.

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Hawaiian musicians go abroad, 1920.

THE SINGING OF THESE HAWAIIANS IS MOVING FORWARD

The photo above is of a group of Hawaiian singers taken to America, and they are in Canada at the moment, as per what Steven Lukua Matthew told Mrs. Rebecca Lukua, his mother here in Honolulu. There are six of them, and they are all Hawaiians, and their names are: the boys, Steven Lukua Matthew, John J. Matthew, and Kahaia Pahu; and the women are Kuuleipoinaole [Ida Alicante], Ane Hila, and Kamaka Pahu. Continue reading

Death of Francis Spencer in Kansas, 1920.

DIED IN AN ACCIDENT IN KANSAS

A wireless [lono uwea olelo] was received by Frank Spencer of Waimea from the state of Kansas informing  him that his child who is attending school there died in an accident, and this tragedy happened because of an elevator [eleveita]. Some time ago, that youth graduated from Kamehameha School with honors, and he was employed at the Paahau sugar plantation for a time, Continue reading

Diamond Kekona plays ukulele in London, 1919.

STRUMS UKULELE IN FOGGY LONDON

Diamond Kekona, one of the five Hawaiians with “The Bird of Paradise” playing a two-year contract.

It’s a far cry from Piccadilly Circus, London, to Honolulu, but the faithful reproduction of a former life in the Hawaiian islands as depicted in Richard Walton  Tully’s “Bird of Paradise” is charming Britons who seek a welcome change from fog and storm. Continue reading

Edward H. Hanapi, Jr. in Asia writes home, 1920.

Hawaiian Youths in  Siberia

To My Dear Papa

From when we left Honolulu until we reached Japan, I have been reminiscing about you and younger brother, Emperor. The first port we entered was Nagasaki in Japan, which is the port which American ships regularly enter; and from this port we went to Vladivostok. While in Nagasaki, I sent a postcard, and perhaps you have received it. In the month of February, I sent $100; I have not received a response from you, papa. I am sending another $75 by bank draft; tell me if you receive this money. Siberia is a cold land, and we have everything we need. When we arrived in this land, we were well taken care of by the group “Knights of Columbus.” Continue reading