Robert Wilcox recovering, 1902.

NEWS OF THE 10th of JANUARY FROM THE DELEGATE.

Washington, D. C., Jan., 10, 1902.–Mrs. R. W. WIlcox, Honolulu, Hawaii: I am doing okay.. I am still in the hands of the physician who is doing his very best; I am still in bed.

Do not be alarmed as it will be all right. Kiss to Keoua and Kapu and also to yourself. Aloha to Mama and Iwa.

ROBERT W. WILCOX.
3:15 P. M

(Home Rula Repubalika, 1/22/1902, p. 2)

Home Rula Repubalika, Buke I, Helu 12, Aoao 6. Ianuari 22, 1902.

More on Shoji Masayoshi portrait, 1881.

[Found under: MISCELLANEOUS.]

We read that Mr. Shoji Masayoshi, a distinguished painter in oil, is at work on a likeness of the King of Hawaii, as His Majesty appeared in Japanese dress, when he was present at an entertainment given in his honour in the Momiji-kwan. It is added that the artist intends to make a gift of his work to the Hawaiian Government.

(Japan Daily Mail, 5/14/1881, p. 554)

Japan Weekly Mail, Volume V, Number 19, Page 554. May 14, 1881.

The Cyclorama of Kilauea at the Chicago World’s Fair, 1893.

Hawaiian Boys at Chicago.

There are eight Hawaiian singing youths at the Cyclorama of Kilauea the Crater of Pele at Chicago, and it would appear as if they are on their way home with Moeheau [Mooheau] aboard the steamship Monowai, or perhaps aboard the Australia. Mr. Whitney saw and met with them in Chicago a few weeks ago. All of them were in good health, and they sang like the call of lovebirds. And everyone who entered to see the exhibit of the cyclorama of Kilauea crater were very amazed.

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O HAWAII NO KA OI, 1895.

HAWAII IS THE BEST.

Shared from a letter from Boston, United States, as follows:

The dignity of a religious assembly was raised because of some dark-skinned Hawaiians whose names are, East Kahulu [East Kahulualii], J. M. Bright, J. Edward, and Mr. Jones, being that they praised the name of the Lord from the choir loft of that sacred house of God.

When the singing of the hymns was done, the preacher of the church introduced the one who would open the sermon, that being Mr. East Kahulualii, one of the full dark-skinned Hawaiian boys, all the while there were thousands of people in that church.

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Hawaiian boys in Port Gamble–A different point of view, 1877.

Runaway Native Boys.–We have before us a letter from a Hawaiian named G. W. S. Keamohuli, dated Port Gamble, Sept. 26th, from which we learn that there are now at that place, five Hawaiian boys who left Honolulu by stowing themselves away on the barks Atlanta and Victor, when those vessels were at this port. Three of these boys–named Nakai, Kikau and Kanahele–left by the Atlanta, and two–named Keliikipi and Kaaoaouila–by the Victor. These adventurous youngsters being too small to earn their living at such labor as offers at Port Gamble, the writer of the letter has taken them in charge until such time as other arrangements can be made.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 11/7/1877, p. 3)

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XIII, Number 45, Page 3. November 7, 1877.

Abduction!? 1877.

Boys were kidnapped.

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:–

I send off my bundle to you, having the right time to do so. For I see that you are one of the shooting stars of the nation of Hawaii, flying from where the sun rises to where the sun sets, shooting all the way here to North America.

The words placed above is what grows in my conscience. Might you be patient and accept the contents of my bundle. For I have seen you and how you have patience to accept what is sent to you. Its contents are here below:–

Five Hawaiian boys were abducted by the lumber transporting ships Atlanta and Victor. Three boys on the Atlanta; these are their names, Nakai, Kikau, and Kanahele. And aboard the Victor, two boys; these are their names, Keliikipi and Kaaoaouila. That is my baggage that I entrust to you, and it is for you to call out loudly to the parents of these boys, as they may be left feeling aloha for their children abducted by the Captains of these ships who break the law of the Nation of Hawaii and King Kalakaua. When these boys arrived here at Port Gamble, the Captains abandoned them. We believe that if there were no Hawaiians here, the boys’ health would have been danger, and they would have had no place to rest their heads.

The place they were hid was in a skiff that had its opening turned over atop the Forward House* of the sailors in the bow. That is where they hid when the ship carrying lumber left Honolulu, that is what they told us. These children are very little, perhaps ten or so years old; not fit to work at the lumber mills here in Puget Sound.

To the Parents–O Parents, watch your children closely, and do not let them wander about the docks, or go aboard the ships, and enjoy feasting on barrel meats, lest they be abducted by the ship Captains like these children. You have heard that Kalakaua’s is a “Lahui increasing nation” and there is a Hawaiian government law that forbids Hawaiians from going abroad unless their contract is approved by the governor of the island on which they live; only with the governor’s approval can they leave; also the Governor must command the ship Captain to care for and return the man or men that he takes away. And if the Captain or Captains do not return the man or men that they take away, then they will be fined $300 for each man. That is the law for the Captains who secretly take away Hawaiians.

To the Governors.–O Governors, do your job conscientiously, and so too your subordinates, be vigilant of your duties, search the trading ships of all types which leave Honolulu, for there are many Hawaiians who leave Honolulu and live abroad for long periods without it being known that they left, and they have been living here in these foreign lands for many years.

But here is my question pertaining to that. Who is at fault? The ship Captain perhaps? The children perhaps? In my opinion, it is the ship captain’s fault, if I am not mistaken. That is according to what the children told us when we questioned them, and they said that they were brought because of the desire of the captain that they come here. If that is true, it would be best if the captains return the boys to Honolulu when the ships go once again, or it would be better if they were tried so that it is made clear if the captains are at fault or if it is the children. As for the names of these ships, I do not know them [Atlanta and Victor??], but the agents of this company and some haole of Honolulu should know, should it be thought to ask about the two.

I have nothing more to talk about at this time, but I ask for your kindness, if I am wrong about this, excuse me, and if I am correct before you and them as well, then place it in your bureau of love, and it will be for you to spread it before the public so that our many friends will know, they who live from Kumukahi where the sun rises to Lehua where the sun sets.

To you goes my warm aloha, and to the type-setting boys of the Press goes my expression of aloha, and to your Editor goes my loving right-handed handshake.

G. W. E. Kawaiulaomaleka,
Puget Sound, Kitsap County, Sep. 28, 1877.

*Lana House. Not sure where this phrase comes from. I could not find it used in any other article. It was suggested by http://www.maritimehawaii.com that this likely refers to the Forward House.

(Kuokoa, 11/10/1877, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 45, Aoao 3. Novemaba 10, 1877.

Hawaiian woman returns from Europe after many years away, 1862.

[Found under: “NA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Hawaiian Woman in Europe.–Early morning on this past Thursday, Kahula (woman) returned from Germany, on the foreign Laura & Louise. She lived many years away from her home lands; she left perhaps in 1857. She said she went to America, Britain, Germany, and her life was comfortable, living with her employers, that being L. H. Anthon, Esq. (Luika), that foreign language speaking haole who lived in Hawaii before.

(Kuokoa, 10/25/1862, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke I, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Okatoba 25, 1862.

Joseph Puni writes to the father of Diamond Kekona, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN.

Opera House,
Dudley, England,
Nov. 4, 1916.

To my true friend, Dick Kekona,

Aloha oe:–Perhaps you are surprised receiving this letter. I have tried all means to release your beloved son Diamond from the British armed forces. I appeared before the American Consul in the countryside here in England, telling them that Diamond is an American. They responded that they will put my request before the head consul in London. On the 17th of September, I went to the Consulate in London, they told me that the consul could not order the British government to release Diamond because he is 25 years old; only those below 20 years old, if they are American citizens. These past days, I decided to have your daughter-in-law (Amy Kekona) to come to see me, and get together with her to think of a way to release her husband; for these good reasons, I ask that you send me his birth certificate, or to go to the governor of Hawaii to write to the Hawaiian Delegate Mr. J. K. Kalanianaole in Washington D. C., to go to the State Department in Washington and have the American Ambassador in London investigate the circumstances of his enlisting in the armed forces, and you verify that your first-born son is a true Hawaiian. He had a document in the city of Paris, France, from the office of the American General, written on the 13th of February, 1914, attesting to the fact that he is a Hawaiian. If he finds these documents, he will be victorious. Do not neglect this, for I am still regretful not having his acting. He has much knowledge in this area, and his showing this to the world would bring fame to the Hawaiian Lahui. I will organize everything here and send it to London. With our sleuthing, I believe everything will progress; may God watch over and keep safe the life of your child until we meet again, amen.

With aloha to your family and the Hawaiian Nation.

JOSEPH PUNI.

Write me at your daughter-in-law’s, c/o 143 Baxter Ave., Kidderminister, England.

(Aloha Aina, 1/19/1917, p. 3)

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 3, Aoao 3. Ianuari 19, 1917.

Too much news today, 1880.

Knowledge Seeking Youths.

We received letters from the youths who traveled in search of knowledge. They are in the city of Cincinnati, State of Ohio, on the past 9th to the 16th of September. They tell of how their travels are going well, the beauty of everything, and their joy and that they are full of hope. We want to tell everything in full pertaining to these Hawaiian youths, but our paper is full, therefore wait for another when we receive letters from them again.

[These youths are Robert Wilcox, James Booth, and William Boyd.]

(Elele Poakolu, 10/6/1880, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke I, Helu 5, Aoao 5. Okatoba 6, 1880.

Henry Grube Marchant, 1893.

Henry Grube is heading back to the land of his birth. He was sent to increase his knowledge in engraving. And it seems that next month, October, is when it is believed that he will return home.

[Henry Grube Marchant was one of the youths sent abroad to Boston to learn engraving as part of King Kalakaua’s Education of Hawaiian Youths in Foreign Countries.]

(Lei Momi, 8/28/1893, p. 3)

Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Augate 28, 1893.