Graduation at Honokaa, 1941.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU HAMAKUA AME KOHALA”]

Honokaa: Last week in the evening of Tuesday, in the hall of Honokaa High School, the graduation ceremony was held for the children who numbered 46, from the 12th grade of the High School of Honokaa. The girls wore white, and the boys wore white pants, black coats, and blue shirts; large bouquets of gardenias were in their hair of the girls, and for the boys, in the collar of their coats. The parents and friends of these children were welcomed by the ushers with paper programs showing the schedule of events of that evening.

At half past seven, the instruments of the Glee Club of the School sounded, at which point the boys and girls marched in pairs into the hall led by their Principal Herman Lasgaard and Mr. Abraham Poepoe. After all the children took their seats, and after everyone was quiet, Mr. Poepoe prayed thanking God for this great assembly and asking God to bless each of the children graduating from the school and to bless them with jobs that will benefit their lives and their parents, and in their areas.

The decoration above this place was beautiful, with flowers and the words “ALOHA” CLASS 1941, with akulikuli flower fashioned on ti leaves. The hall was also filled with parents and friends, totaling some 500 or more perhaps.


On Tuesday at half past one, 81 children graduated from the ninth grade of that school. The hall was filled once again with parents and friends. Seen were gifts of flowers and other presents brought by the parents and friends for their children to give them joy for their graduating from this grade of the school.

Some of the Hawaiian children who properly graduated from the 12th grade of the High School were Daisey Lindsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Lindsey of Kamuela; Betty Herrman, daughter of Mrs. Camella Hermann of Haina; Henry Keomalu Jr., son of Mr. Henry Keomalu, teacher at Kaapahu School, and residing at Kalopa.


At 11 o’clock on this past Friday, the electric bell of Honokaa School sounded, telling the teachers and the all of the children of the school that the time for school was over, and that it was vacation. That song was sung, “What ALOHA Means.” And the children were dismissed to go home. A number of teachers got in their cars and went to Hilo to get there before the plane for Honolulu left. They went off to San Francisco to attend as Representatives to the Great Teacher Conference of America. Some teachers remained at home to vacation.

[Congratulations to all the keiki graduating this year (and their families) in Hamakua and across the archipelago! Be safe out there.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/11/1941, p. 1)

HokuoHawaii_6_11_1941_1.png

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 7, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1941.

 

 

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J. H. Kanepuu the traditionalist, 1970.

Hawaiian Math

By Russell and Peg Apple

BY THE MID 1800s, the Hawaiian people were betwixt and between two cultures. There was the pull and the momentum of the old—the traditional Hawaiian; and the lure and exhortations of the new—a New England brand of Western.

And the Hawaiians were aware of the situation. They were not above pointing out to each other the conflicts they met in their everyday life.

One who did so was a man from Palolo, a Mr. J. H. Kanepuu. He wrote in the Hawaiian language newspaper Ke Au Okoa, and on Jan. 21, 1867, saw the need to call attention to two counting systems that existed side by side.

KANEPUU NOTED the conflict in the markets where Hawaiians bought and sold. There was a generation gap in methods of enumeration. Most of the fishermen and farmers who sold in the markets were old men who counted by the Hawaiian method. Those who bought were younger folks who counted by the haole system. Few knew both well.

The momentum and practices of the past fixed the habit patterns of the fishermen who caught flying fish, mullet, mackerel and milkfish for the Honolulu markets. They either sold their catch themselves, or it was sold by family members of the same generation. They counted Hawaiian style.

Those who bought counted haole style. They had been to the mission and public schools. They knew how to count by tens, from one on up into the tens of thousands. Each had ten fingers, including thumbs, to help.

BUT THE Hawaiian system was based on the numeral four, not the decimal system. Hawaiians had four fingers on each hand to help in counting.

Both the old timers and the younger Hawaiians spoke Hawaiian fluently. But the haole terms had been translated into Hawaiian and taught to the people who went to school, along with the counting-by-tens method. It was the same sort of confusion which occurs today when a nation switches from pounds-shillings-and-pence to a coinage based on the decimal system. Or when a student who learned his work in inches, feet, yards and miles tries to deal with millimeters, centimeters, meters kilometers. Misunderstandings and confusion result.

LOT KAMEHAMEHA, later to rule as Kamehameha V, was educated by Christian missionaries and was versed in the Western system. Kanepuu wrote that when he was still Prince Lot, he received a gift of fish at his house in Honolulu. This was sometime in the early 1800s, before Lot Kamehameha was crowned.

The men who brought the fish used the old system, the Prince only understood the new.

“How much fish?” asked the prince.

“One lau and nine kaau,” answered the Hawaiian servant who delivered the fish, a gift from chief Kuhia.

THIS ANSWER distressed Lot Kamehameha and he alsmost became angry. On seeing this, the Hawaiian switched to the new system. Continue reading

Lorrin Andrews’ Hawaiian language dictionary, 1862.

Kumu Olelo Hawaii.

We are thrilled to hear that the Hawaiian Language Manual being assembled by the esteemed L. Andrews [ka mea Mahaloia L. Aneru]. It is a Book that explains the essence of words, like the haole; only the letter P remains, and then it is finished. There was a great resolution by the Legislature to set aside funds for this endeavor; but not a penny has been given by the Government Treasury. It can be made ready for printing should there be a skilled Hawaiian, and if there is not, it will take about three months before it can be printed. And now, there are many haole who want to know the Hawaiian language; and so too of the Hawaiians, they want to know English; therefore, we believe that it is appropriate that the money is spent on this. Continue reading

Kamehameha Song Contest winners! 1945.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

CONTEST WINNERS
By Fletcher Aleong

Entering their seventh and last song contest as heavy favorites, the senior class of KSB triumphed again by winning their sixth consecutive annual song fest Sunday, March 4 with 176 points.

Led by Henry Chai, who has been director for four years, this 61 voice chorus, trained by Sgt. Olaf Frodsham for the past four years, sang a medley of “Aloha Oe” and “Na Lei O Hawaii” for their choice selection.

The seniors were awarded the George A. Andrus cup by defeating the tenth and eleventh grades in senior division competition. The junior division winner was the ninth grade by rating higher than the eighth grade group was awarded the Richard H. Trent trophy.

“Pu’uwa’awa’a” and “Malana’i Anu Ka Makani” were the prize songs chosen by the music department of KSB for the senior and junior divisions. Mr. Frank Kernohan and Mr. William Sievers, music instructors at the school for boys, assisted the senior and junior divisions.

The class of 1946, juniors, placed second in the senior division with 166 points. Edwin Beamer, grandson of Peter Beamer of Hilo, led the juniors for his fifth consecutive competition. It’s choice song was “Wailana.”

Placing third in the same division was the sophmore class who received 156 points. A meley of three songs “Kuu Lei Pikake,” “Lei Awapuhi” and “Roselani” served as their choice selection. Cleighton Beamer, another grandson of Peter Beamer of Hilo, directed the class of 1947. Continue reading

Kamehameha Song Contest past, 1945.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

BOY’S SONG CONTEST

Kamehameha School for Boys will present its 24 annual song contest on March 4 at the school auditorium with the eight and ninth graders competing in the junior division and the tenth, eleventh and twelfth grade boys in the senior division.

The eighth graders have their choice song “Beautiful Kahana” and the ninth graders choice is “Ka Anoi.” The juniors have selected “Wai Lana” [Wailana] and the tenth grade boys a medley of “Kuu Lei Pikake,” “Lei Awapuhi” and “Roselani.” A medley of “Na Lei O Hawaii” and “Aloha Oe” is the senior choice. Continue reading

Lydia Bingham returns to head the Honolulu Female Seminary, 1867

[Found under: “NOTES OF THE WEEK.”]

Honolulu Female Seminary.—In our advertising columns will be seen the advertisement of the Honolulu Female Academy, which is another of the schools provided by Christian benevolence for the benefit of the children of this highly favored land. This institution will, it is hoped, supply a felt need for a home for girls, in the town of Honolulu, yet not too near its center of business. It is being commenced in the substantial buildings erected many years since by the American Mission as a printing house and bindery, in connection with the premises of the Rev. E. W. Clark, Continue reading