Hui Oiwi o Kamehameha, 1943.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

By CARL THOENE

Alexander Minoaka Thoene has been elected kahuna nui of Hui Oiwi, the Hawaiian club, at the Kamehameha School for Boys. Minoaka, who is a senior, has been a member of the club since 1939. Norman Lunahooponopono Rosehill has been chosen kahuna, and William Kahuelani Stewart is now the club’s kakauolelo. Howard Kalani Benham has been chosen puuku and Edwin Mahiai Beamer has been re-elected alakai himeni. Continue reading

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Scholarships from the government, 1892

ANNOUNCING.

This is a list of the few children who are at some schools, with the names of their parents and where they came from. Whereas the Legislature set aside $6,000 for the tuition of these children.

Oahu College [Punahou], 9.

E. A. Rosa, Samuel Mahelona, R. Ross, Margaret Mossman, Florence Carter; Edward Woodward of Honolulu, Oahu.

C. K. Farden, Makawao, Maui; M. Sunter, Kona, Hawaii; Edward Hapai, G. W. A. Hapai, Hilo, Hawaii.

Kamehameha School.

Robert Baker, H. R. Baker, Honolulu, Oahu; S. Kupau, J. K. Kupau, Waianae, Oahu; Eli Pihi, Rev. S. Kapu, Wailuku Maui; W. Makakoa, W. K. Makakoa, Waihee, Maui; J. Kauka, Kauka, Makawao, Maui; Alfred Kahilialau, M. Kane, Halawa; William Beers, J. W. Moanauli, Honokaa, Hamakua. Continue reading

Tom Hiona opens halau, 1947.

TOM HIONA

WELL KNOWN TEACHER Of Hula to Open Studio on March 1

One of Hawaii’s best known teachers of the hula and directors of hula dancing, Tom Hiona, will open a new studio March 1. the studio is located at 1914 Kahai St., Kalihi.

For the past 15 years, Tom Hiona has been a leader in teaching both ancient and modern hula dances. He will instruct classes in all types of hula, including the following—pahu or drum dances, the olapa, uliuli or rattle gourd, puili or bamboo, iliili or pebble, ka kalaau or tapping sticks as well as modern dances. Continue reading

Early days of some of the greats, 1933.

PTA news
FOR ISLAND PARENTS & TEACHERS

CUMMINS SCHOOL

C. C. Robinson of the Y. M. C. A. spoke on “Developing Comradship Between Parents and Children” at the Liholiho P. T. A. meeting at Cummins school last Thursday evening. F. Nobriga, principal, introduced the speaker.

It was announced that there will be a sale of laulaus at the school on February 4, with Mrs. Kaulia in charge.

There will be a Valentine Party on February 14, for the faculty and P. T. A. officers.

Each month a different group has charge of the entertainment. At this meeting Mrs. Kaulia presented the following Hawaiian program which included hula, “Beauty” by Iolani Luahine; solo, Leimomi Kaulia; trio, Lydia Kaloio and companions; chant, Keahi Luahine; hula olapa, Helen Smythe; duet, Leimomi Kaulia and Mabel Kaulia; songs, “Akaka” by Emma Paishon and Iolani Luahine; hula, Lydia Kaloio and Julia Doyle, and hula, Lydia Kaloio. Continue reading

Mele and education according to Andrew K. Poepoe, 1930.

Modern Teacher Tells How Old Hawaiians Were Taught

By A. K. POEPOE

(This is the second article by Mr. Poepoe, a Normal school instructor, telling of Hawaiian tone production methods.)

A story obtained from Kona, Hawaii, and recorded by the late Dr. Emerson, mentioning one of the methods used for the training of the chanters conveys to me several fundamental principles vital to vocal art, that aid in verifying the distinct tone focus and timbre in the Hawaiian voice.

“It refers to a little pool of shallow water in the rocks by the sea at Kailua, Hawaii, where the sun was reflected late every afternoon for a considerable interval. This and similar pools were called ‘poho na’u,’ poho, meaning both a depression in the surface and to blow gently. These pools were great swimming centers in olden times. Continue reading

Graduation at Honokaa, 1941.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU HAMAKUA AME KOHALA”]

Honokaa: Last week in the evening of Tuesday, in the hall of Honokaa High School, the graduation ceremony was held for the children who numbered 46, from the 12th grade of the High School of Honokaa. The girls wore white, and the boys wore white pants, black coats, and blue shirts; large bouquets of gardenias were in their hair of the girls, and for the boys, in the collar of their coats. The parents and friends of these children were welcomed by the ushers with paper programs showing the schedule of events of that evening.

At half past seven, the instruments of the Glee Club of the School sounded, at which point the boys and girls marched in pairs into the hall led by their Principal Herman Lasgaard and Mr. Abraham Poepoe. After all the children took their seats, and after everyone was quiet, Mr. Poepoe prayed thanking God for this great assembly and asking God to bless each of the children graduating from the school and to bless them with jobs that will benefit their lives and their parents, and in their areas.

The decoration above this place was beautiful, with flowers and the words “ALOHA” CLASS 1941, with akulikuli flower fashioned on ti leaves. The hall was also filled with parents and friends, totaling some 500 or more perhaps.


On Tuesday at half past one, 81 children graduated from the ninth grade of that school. The hall was filled once again with parents and friends. Seen were gifts of flowers and other presents brought by the parents and friends for their children to give them joy for their graduating from this grade of the school.

Some of the Hawaiian children who properly graduated from the 12th grade of the High School were Daisey Lindsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Lindsey of Kamuela; Betty Herrman, daughter of Mrs. Camella Hermann of Haina; Henry Keomalu Jr., son of Mr. Henry Keomalu, teacher at Kaapahu School, and residing at Kalopa.


At 11 o’clock on this past Friday, the electric bell of Honokaa School sounded, telling the teachers and the all of the children of the school that the time for school was over, and that it was vacation. That song was sung, “What ALOHA Means.” And the children were dismissed to go home. A number of teachers got in their cars and went to Hilo to get there before the plane for Honolulu left. They went off to San Francisco to attend as Representatives to the Great Teacher Conference of America. Some teachers remained at home to vacation.

[Congratulations to all the keiki graduating this year (and their families) in Hamakua and across the archipelago! Be safe out there.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/11/1941, p. 1)

HokuoHawaii_6_11_1941_1.png

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 7, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1941.

 

 

J. H. Kanepuu the traditionalist, 1970.

Hawaiian Math

By Russell and Peg Apple

BY THE MID 1800s, the Hawaiian people were betwixt and between two cultures. There was the pull and the momentum of the old—the traditional Hawaiian; and the lure and exhortations of the new—a New England brand of Western.

And the Hawaiians were aware of the situation. They were not above pointing out to each other the conflicts they met in their everyday life.

One who did so was a man from Palolo, a Mr. J. H. Kanepuu. He wrote in the Hawaiian language newspaper Ke Au Okoa, and on Jan. 21, 1867, saw the need to call attention to two counting systems that existed side by side.

KANEPUU NOTED the conflict in the markets where Hawaiians bought and sold. There was a generation gap in methods of enumeration. Most of the fishermen and farmers who sold in the markets were old men who counted by the Hawaiian method. Those who bought were younger folks who counted by the haole system. Few knew both well.

The momentum and practices of the past fixed the habit patterns of the fishermen who caught flying fish, mullet, mackerel and milkfish for the Honolulu markets. They either sold their catch themselves, or it was sold by family members of the same generation. They counted Hawaiian style.

Those who bought counted haole style. They had been to the mission and public schools. They knew how to count by tens, from one on up into the tens of thousands. Each had ten fingers, including thumbs, to help.

BUT THE Hawaiian system was based on the numeral four, not the decimal system. Hawaiians had four fingers on each hand to help in counting.

Both the old timers and the younger Hawaiians spoke Hawaiian fluently. But the haole terms had been translated into Hawaiian and taught to the people who went to school, along with the counting-by-tens method. It was the same sort of confusion which occurs today when a nation switches from pounds-shillings-and-pence to a coinage based on the decimal system. Or when a student who learned his work in inches, feet, yards and miles tries to deal with millimeters, centimeters, meters kilometers. Misunderstandings and confusion result.

LOT KAMEHAMEHA, later to rule as Kamehameha V, was educated by Christian missionaries and was versed in the Western system. Kanepuu wrote that when he was still Prince Lot, he received a gift of fish at his house in Honolulu. This was sometime in the early 1800s, before Lot Kamehameha was crowned.

The men who brought the fish used the old system, the Prince only understood the new.

“How much fish?” asked the prince.

“One lau and nine kaau,” answered the Hawaiian servant who delivered the fish, a gift from chief Kuhia.

THIS ANSWER distressed Lot Kamehameha and he alsmost became angry. On seeing this, the Hawaiian switched to the new system. Continue reading