“Ka ukulii ia o Hawaii la!” 1866.

Speedy is the tiny one.—This past week, a little child appeared at the Hawaii Post office who was perhaps six years old, his name being Keaweehu, from Hilo of the Kanilehua rain; Continue reading

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Art by Hawaiians at Sana Lui, 1888.

SAINT LOUIS SCHOOL.

We went to tour the school of Saint Louis these past days and drawing which is outside of the regular work from their books is what we were most impressed with at their skill, talent, and true excellence in that activity. These are the majority of the paintings which we  acquired. Continue reading

Kalihi Waena School principal fined, 1918.

THE PRINCIPAL OF KALIHI WAENA SCHOOL FOUND GUILTY AND FINED $50.

Some time ago, the principal of Kalihi Waena School was sued for whipping William Furtado, one of the students of that school. When the case was heard in the district court of Honolulu nei, before Judge B. Lightfoot, the judge postponed his ruling, and the other day he gave his ruling and found the one sued guilty and fined him $50.00. Continue reading

I wonder if this ever happened, and if it did, if the recordings are still around, 1934.

Genuine Hulas to Be Preserved In Series of Motion Pictures

Aid of modern motion pictures and phonographs will be enlisted to preserve the Hawaiian hula as it was danced in Kalakaua’s days, so that burlesque innovations will not cause the dance to degenerate in years to come, it was announced Monday when Akoni Mika, 68-year-old hula master, arrived here from his home at Keaukaha, Hilo. Continue reading

E. K. Fernandez, 1963.

Entertainment

E. K. Fernandez is a man whose life has been jam-packed with “firsts.”

At the turn of the century he promoted the “first” giveaway, offering a camera a week to attract customers to his photo supply business.

He brought to Hawaii the “first” English motion picture camera and showed the “first” talkies in the Islands.

He pushed through the Legislature a measure allowing, for the “first” time, motion pictures on Sundays (providing they were educational and Biblical in nature).

His “first” Sunday motion picture? Something with Charlie Chaplin titled “Tillie’s Punctured  Romance.”

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Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

Continue reading