O HAWAII NO KA OI, 1895.

HAWAII IS THE BEST.

Shared from a letter from Boston, United States, as follows:

The dignity of a religious assembly was raised because of some dark-skinned Hawaiians whose names are, East Kahulu [East Kahulualii], J. M. Bright, J. Edward, and Mr. Jones, being that they praised the name of the Lord from the choir loft of that sacred house of God.

When the singing of the hymns was done, the preacher of the church introduced the one who would open the sermon, that being Mr. East Kahulualii, one of the full dark-skinned Hawaiian boys, all the while there were thousands of people in that church.

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Hawaiian Language in 1918.

Is It Right to Neglect Our Mother Tongue?

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:–I ask of your graciousness in allowing me to clarify my thoughts on the title that appears above; I believe this title will become something that will motivate some of our people to also submit their thoughts [to be published] on that topic, that being: “Is it right to neglect our mother tongue?”

I bring up that question in regard to the Hawaiian language, the mother tongue of this lahui, because I see with these passing days, it is as if it is actually true, that there is no desire or wish within us to perpetuate our language to the very last generation of Hawaiians.

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On Irene Haalou Kahalelaukoa Ii, 1886

The Work of John Ii Lives On.

Our readers heard earlier of the marriage of Irene Haalou Kahalelaukoa Ii, daughter of the late Hon. John Ii, to Charles A. Brown, one of the young haole of this town. The lahui will all be joyous when they hear that the daughter of Ii has began at once to walk in the footsteps walked before by her father. Ii was a man who felt much aloha for his lahui, and the need for him to raise up his people.

He gave his life to educating the alii and the makaainana of the old days. Irene, his only child, is following after the deeds of her father. One of the first things this young lady did after her marriage was to take two girls of her lahui from the district of Ewa, and enrolling them in the Kawaiahao Boarding School and paying for the costs of their education. This is an act of aloha. This is like the deeds of John Ii. The name and works of the father live on through the daughter. The friends of Ii will undoubtedly be joyous when hearing of this act of goodwill by the daughter.

(Kuokoa, 10/9/1886, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 41, Aoao 2. Okatoba 9, 1886.

On the new Lahainaluna buildings, 1905.

Pertaining to Lahainaluna.

The school these days is not of that stature of days past, in its functions, and the condition of the dorms, and where they are to be taught.

The school this day, [something here seems to be missing], like something the former principal [Alatau Tamchiboulac Atkinson] stated in his speech on the day the opening of the buildings, “Lahainaluna school is the college for the poor.”

Those words are true, and it is still so today.

These are beautiful buildings, and the rooms are supplied with beds and pillows; the children are to supply a pillowcase, and sheets, and a blanket to sleep with; they have no need to worry about a mosquito net, for each room is furnished with metal mosquito screening, and the lights are electric.

The school begins on Monday, the 4th of September, 1905, and it is desired that the students arrive earlier than that, and if some come late, they will be left without a room.

So too with the new students, arrive before the beginning of school to receive a room. Students from 14 years old and up are wanted.

The Principal,
C. A. McDonald.
Lahainaluna School, July 28, 1905.

(Kuokoa, 8/11/1905, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 32, Aoao 5. Augate 11, 1905.

John Wind enrolls into Wailuku Theological School, 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

A foreigner learning to become a pastor.—In a letter secretly received by one of us, the writer said that an Indian enrolled in the Wailuku Theological School, and that he is a stranger. His name is Ioane Makani. We have admiration for the great desire of this stranger to gain knowledge of the occupation of a pastor, and it would appear that he will most definitely return to teach his Indian People who live wild in the forests of America.

[John Wind is reported to have attended Royal School. And from there it seems he was admitted to the preparatory department of Oahu College, as per a PCA 8/26/1858, p. 2 article.]

(Kuokoa, 7/7/1866, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 7, 1866.

King Kalakaua’s Study Abroad Program, 1936.

[Found under: “E MAU ANA ANEI KA OLELO HAWAII”]

King Kalakaua Gave His Support to Educate His Lahui

While King Kalakaua was upon the throne, as a result of him speaking with his Cabinet, and also approved by the Legislature of 1882 or 1883, there were many Hawaiians who were sent to far away lands in seek of education. It feels like it happened between the years 1883 and 1884. Some of these boys went at the government’s expense, and some under the expense of the Father Missionaries.

1. Robert W. Wilcox and Robert N. Boyd, were sent to military school in Italy.

2. Matthew Makalua and Piianaia, were sent to Oxford in England, to medical school. Piianaia did not graduate, but Makaula did graduate and became a very great doctor in England. He married a woman and he had a number of children. He is dead now. He did not return to Hawaii.

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Huli Kalo of all varieties! 1913.

Taro Tops! Taro Tops!!

You can obtain Huli Kao of all varieties at the Hilo Boarding School. $2.50 for a thousand.

Inquire of the Principal of the Hilo Boarding School [Kula Hanai o Hilo].

Levi C. Lyman [L. C. Laimana]
Principal.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/2/1913, p. 3)

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 7, Helu 31, Aoao 3. Ianuari 2, 1913.

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

Marriage of Mikala Kamalimali, April 24, 1839.

Puawaina, May 6, 1839.

A MARRIAGE.

Hear me, O K. H. [Kumu Hawaii Newspaper]

I am telling you of something that I witnessed.

Mr. Sila* of the United States was married to a woman here in Honolulu; Mikala Kamalimali is the name of his wife, the daughter of Mamala; the 24th of April was when they were married, at the house of Bingham [Binamu], the pastor here in Honolulu. Continue reading

Hawaiian Mission Academy, graduating class, 1924.

GRADUATING CLASS, 1924, HAWAIIAN MISSION ACADEMY

Back row, left to right—Clarence E. Stafford, class pres.; Jonah Kumalae Jr., treas.; T. Y. Yamamoto, Masuo Susukida. Continue reading