Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

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Lahainaluna publishes a handwritten newspaper, 1874.

[Found under: No ka Malu Ulu o Lele.”]

A Newspaper. At the Lahainaluna College, there is a newspaper that is handwritten by some students of the school. This newspaper was initiated for the local benefits of the students of the school. Continue reading

Mary Jane Fayerweather Montano story part 3, 1893.

Former Belle Tells Of Honolulu Society In Far-Off ‘Sixties’

Mrs. Montano Continues Her Charming Reminiscences of Old Hawaii; Notable Characters and Incidents Revived After Six Decades During Which Community Has Moved Far, Far Away From  Them

BY MARY JANE FAYERWEATHER MONTANO

(Continued from last Sunday)

A year or more after the smallpox epidemic, which swept our Islands in 1853, came a greater shock to the Hawaiian nation. King Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III, died, the loved one of the Hawaiian people. Every man, woman and child wept. After a few days the Palace gates were opened to the public and there was also a call to all to cover the streets with fine grass. I went out for grass which was to be found in the kalo patches. The kalo patches were not very far from Beretania street in those days. I did not follow the others, but I went right into the King’s gardens, called Beretania, where the Episcopal Cathedral now stands. I stepped into a kalo patch and picked an armful of the soft grass. Tears blinded my eyes. I thought of the day when His Majesty called to see my mother. He ran his fingers through my  hear, and asked my mother, “Is this your little ‘white hair'”? Mother answered, “Yes”. Continue reading

Stephen Reynolds supports education of half-castes, 1847.

[COMMUNICATED.]

Mrs. Gummer’s School.—On Monday last an examination of Mrs. Gummer’s scholars took place at the residence of Stephen Reynolds, Esquire, Consul for the city of Bremen. This gentleman has for years distinguished himself as the active benefactor of children belonging to the class familiarly known as half-castes. It was he who first suggested the idea of a school to Mrs. Gummer, in which children of that class and of whites should be received indiscriminately. The preliminary difficulties to its establishment were overcome, mainly, through his exertions and the perseverance of Mrs. Gummer. Continue reading

Expulsion from Ahuimanu College, 1876.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Ahuimanu College—Published in our paper last week was a letter written by some of the boys of that school, pertaining to the boarding, the education, and the work at that school. This week, we report that the tree and the fruit was seen. The words in the paper were taken to each student, and they were asked, “Are the words in our newspaper true?” Those who said yes were expelled, Continue reading

Florence Elizabeth Kealumaemae Ching to marry Barrister Allen Richardson, 1945.

Florence Ching To Be Bride Of Capt. Richardson

Mr. and Mrs. Quon Chiu Ching of Honolulu and Port Allen, Kauai, have recently announced the engagement of their daughter, Florence Elizabeth Kealumaemae, to Capt. Barrister Allen Richardson., USA, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Arnold Richardson of Kealakekua, Hawaii. Continue reading