“Aole na ka malihini e ao mai ia’u i ka mooolelo o ko’u lahui…” 1868.

Hawaiian History, by Hawaiians.

The early history of all nations without a literature, is necessarily traditionary. That of the Hawaiians, previous to the advent of the missionaries, is of course derivable from the traditions handed down from father to son, of those families immediately attendant upon the chiefs, known by the term of kahus—literally, body attendants. These body servants constituted a class of themselves, and it was their province not only to wait on the chiefs personally, but to carefully commit to memory and to transmit to their successors, everything connected with the birth and lineage of their lords—quite after the style of the bards and harpers of olden times in Britain. Continue reading

Advertisements

Kamehameha Girls’ School Art Week, 1941.

Art Week Celebrated

FINISHING TOUCHES—Amelia Kaopua, president of the Kamehameha School for Girls’ student body, yesterday put finishing touches on her landscape preparatory to its entry in the Art Week show. Art Week began yesterday and will continue through Friday under the direction of Miss Evelyn Erickson, art instructor. (Advertiser Photo). Continue reading

Art by Hawaiians at Sana Lui, 1888.

SAINT LOUIS SCHOOL.

We went to tour the school of Saint Louis these past days and drawing which is outside of the regular work from their books is what we were most impressed with at their skill, talent, and true excellence in that activity. These are the majority of the paintings which we  acquired. Continue reading

Kalihi Waena School principal fined, 1918.

THE PRINCIPAL OF KALIHI WAENA SCHOOL FOUND GUILTY AND FINED $50.

Some time ago, the principal of Kalihi Waena School was sued for whipping William Furtado, one of the students of that school. When the case was heard in the district court of Honolulu nei, before Judge B. Lightfoot, the judge postponed his ruling, and the other day he gave his ruling and found the one sued guilty and fined him $50.00. Continue reading