Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

Marriage of Mikala Kamalimali, April 24, 1839.

Puawaina, May 6, 1839.

A MARRIAGE.

Hear me, O K. H. [Kumu Hawaii Newspaper]

I am telling you of something that I witnessed.

Mr. Sila* of the United States was married to a woman here in Honolulu; Mikala Kamalimali is the name of his wife, the daughter of Mamala; the 24th of April was when they were married, at the house of Bingham [Binamu], the pastor here in Honolulu. Continue reading

Hawaiian Mission Academy, graduating class, 1924.

GRADUATING CLASS, 1924, HAWAIIAN MISSION ACADEMY

Back row, left to right—Clarence E. Stafford, class pres.; Jonah Kumalae Jr., treas.; T. Y. Yamamoto, Masuo Susukida. Continue reading

A kingdom of literacy, 1869.

Hear this.

May our newspaper readers of this past year see this; while we are busy fulfilling your subscriptions for the time, if you do not receive this year’s newspapers in some of your districts, do not be puzzled, but think first about not paying for the year being the reason newspapers have not been sent, however if you are prepared to pay your debts of the past and for this current year, then newspapers will be handed over with no delay as you per your wishes. Continue reading

Kamehameha School’s first Founder’s Day held in gymnasium at 3:30 p.m., December 19, 1888.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

First Celebration of Founder’s Day—Interesting Exercises.

There was a fair gathering at the Kamehameha School on Wednesday afternoon, the occasion being the first observance of Founder’s Day, the birthday anniversary of the late Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop, by whose munificent bequest the institution was founded. The exercises were held in the gymnasium and the following invited guests were present: H. R. H. Princess Liliuokalani attended by Mrs. J. O. Carter, Hon. C. R. Bishop, Rev. C. M. Hyde, D. D., and Mrs. Hyde, Rev. E. G. Beckwith, D. D., Rev. W. C. Merritt and Mrs. Merritt, Lieut. Crawford, U. S. N., Mrs. W. B. Oleson, Hon. W. F. Allen and Mrs. Allen, Hon. H. M. Whitney, Capt. Bourke, R. N., Capt. Acland, R. N., Major-General Cunliffe, R. A., Hon. S. M. Damon, Mr. W. W. Hall and Mrs. Hall, Prof. M. M. Scott and Mrs. Scott, Mr. J. H. Paty and Mrs. Paty, Mrs. J. U. Kawainui, Mrs. Napoliona, Prof. W. D. Alexander, Mr. C. M. Cooke and Mrs. Cooke, Mrs. Hartwell, Mr. T. G. Gribble and Mrs. Gribble, Mrs. Whitman, and a few others. Continue reading

Kamehameha School’s first founders day celebration, 1888.

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

On this Wednesday, at Kamehameha School, a gathering of remembrance was held on the birthday of the Princess Pauahi Bishop, the open-hearted one who set aside the school as a place for the youth of this new generation of Hawaiians to go to be educated. Speeches were given, each speaking of the great works of our alii who passed, before a large audience that was invited; Continue reading

I wonder what the other 88 photos were like, 1953.

HAWAIIANS ACT LIKE JAPANESE—Second graders of the Kamehameha Preparatory School donned Japanese costumes to enact this story of Japanese life. The photograph is one of the 90 in the exhibit Kamehameha Folio opening today at Bishop Museum in commemoration of the birthdate of Bernice Pauahi Bishop.—Kam School Photo.

KAMEHAMEHA FOLIO—The beaut of the Hawaiian kahili is reflected on the face of Nani Kapu, Kamehameha School student, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kapu. Nani’s photograph will be one of the 90 showing the activities of Kamehameha School students in the exhibit, Kamehameha Folio, opening today at Bishop Museum.—Luryier Diamond Photo.

Kam Schools Open Pauahi Birthday Museum Exhibit

Pauahi, daughter of the High Chiefs Konia and Paki, was born December 19, 1831, a date commemorated each year by the students of the Kamehameha Schools. Continue reading

Death of Ida Pope, Principal of Kamehameha School for Girls, 1914.

MISS IDA M. POPE DIED IN CHICAGO

Had Been at Home About a Month

SHOCK TO BUCYRUS FRIENDS

Burial to be in Bucyrus Friday Morning, the Remains to Arrive on the Train From Chicago at 9 O’clock—Short Service at the Grave.

Bucyrus friends were shocked to receive a message announcing the death of Miss Ida M. Pope at Chicago, Tuesday evening at 8:40. Mrs. Thomas Jesson received a message from Henry Pope just after noon that Miss Pope had died, and burial would be on the family lot at Bucyrus Friday morning, the remains arriving at 9:09 and proceeding at once to the cemetery where services would be held at 10 o’clock. Continue reading

News of the death of Ida Pope, 1914.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

By way of telegraph, the friends on this past Wednesday received news of the death of Miss Ida M. Pope, the principal of the Kamehameha School for Girls, on the morning of that day, at Chicago.

(Kuokoa, 7/17/1914, p. 4)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LII, Helu 29, Aoao 4. Iulai 17, 1914.