Pueo found in Kalihi, 1902.

SCARCE NATIVE OWLS ARE FOUND IN KALIHI VALLEY

THE HAWAIIAN OWL.  Photo by Williams.

A NEST of four baby owls was discovered about three months ago by Dr. George Huddy in the Kalihi valley behind his residence. The discovery of the quartette of owlets is important in that few of the species have been found in late years. Three of them died shortly after being taken into captivity, but the oldest of the lot lived and is growing into a fine bird, and is at present about the size of a small pullet. He is thoroughly domesticated and makes himself perfectly at home in the residence of Dr. Huddy, mingling with the people without fear.

The three dead ones were taken in charge by Mr. Bryan, Professor Brigham’s assistant at the Bishop Museum, and they are now stuffed and form a group with one brought to the museum about four years ago. It has been said at the museum that the owls are exceedingly rare and are valuable in the preserved state for the museum.

The pet eats mice as well as raw meat. Dr. Huddy was quite troubled as to the manner in which the owl digested the bones and was rewarded a short time ago when the owl retired to a corner and began retching. Soon a quantity of bones issued from his throat, and the youngster then resumed his eating of further food.

The owl is of the “horned” species. When approached by some one he does not know two groups of feathers on the back rise upward in a threatening manner and remain in that position until the stranger retires. If it is some one he knows the feathers fall back and he courts their attention.

The owner of the rare bird states that none of his family have known of the existence of such owls in the Kalihi valley for the past forty years. They were at one time plentiful. The native for the owl is pueo. When fully grown it is the size of a large hen or the alala, or crow. Its feathers are mottled, its eyes exceedingly large and the claws are sharp like those of a cat. In appearance the owl’s head is very much like that of a cat. It catches mice, small birds and young chickens, on which it lives. The feathers were formerly made into very handsome kahilis.

In ancient times the owl was thought to be a god and was worshipped by multitudes. Some families looked upon the appearance of an owl near their habitation as a warning of approaching death; others as the coming of good luck. On the hills back of Kalapu, in Manoa Valley, beyond the bluff on which the Castle residence is located, owls once inhabited the caves in great numbers.

One of the legends of Manoa Valley gives the owl great prominence as god. The legend of Kahalaopuna shows that the owl was looked upon as such, a certain owl being known as the guardian of the beautiful maiden.

[Does anyone know of kahili made with pueo feathers?]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/11/1902, p. 5)

SCARCE NATIVE OWLS ARE FOUND IN KALIHI VALLEY

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXVII, Number 12, Page 5. February 11, 1902.

 

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In the collections of the Bishop Museum, 1903.

THE PEN WITH WHICH ROOSEVELT SIGNED THE FIRE CLAIMS BILL OF HAWAII.

Washington, Jan. 23. The pen with which the President signed the Hawaiian Fire Claims Bill [Bila Poho Ahi Hawaii] is a remarkable pen. This pen was made from the quill of a feather of a wild eagle, and that feather was taken from a war headdress of a wild Arapaho Indian. This pen is now in the care of Pratt to be placed in the Bishop Museum of Kamehameha in Honolulu.

This pen was gifted to the Hon. William A. Richards, a former Governor of Wyoming, and currently a Commissioner of Public Lands [Aina Aupuni]. This feather was taken by Richards from the headdress of an Arapaho Indian 18 years ago. He thought it was the right time for this feather to be put to some important use for Hawaii, therefore, he ordered one of the workers in his office to fashion the feather into a pen. Let it be remembered that this person who was given the feather to make a pen is a man of much seniority who was working in that office for fifty-one years.

(Aloha Aina, 2/7/1903, p. 1)

KA PENI A RUSEVALA I KAKAU AI I KA BILA POHO AHI O HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1903.

More on the building of the Bishop Museum, 1902.

Sent to Minnesota

KOA TREES FOR THE MUSEUM.

Aboard the Clipper Ship, S. N. Castle, were taken koa trees from the two Kona [North and South Kona] for cases and other decorations for the Museum standing at the Kamehameha School. The koa trees will be taken to San Francisco and from there they will be taken aboard steam locomotive to Minnesota, and there they will be made into beautiful glass cases [ume aniani] or perhaps beautiful stairs for the planned annex for the Museum.

These koa trees were selected from places in Kona, Hawaii, and when they are fashioned, they will be fine decorations. When the idea for a new annex first came up, the lack of koa was noticed, being that only native woods were wanted for the interior. People were soon sent to the two Kona to search for koa fitting for the purpose, and when it was found, it was sent here to Honolulu. All together, the gathered lumber totals 26,000 feet. They weigh seven tons. Being that the job was given to a company in Minnesota, the koa was sent there, and from there it will return to Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 1/31/1902, p. 6)

Hoounaia no Minesota

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 5, Aoao 6. Ianuari 31, 1902.

More on the Wahiawa “healing stones,” 1927.

THE SUPERNATURAL ROCKS WILL BE LEFT IN THEIR PLACE.

At the meeting of the Daughters of Hawaii last week Wednesday in the Home of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani in Nuuanu, the association decided not to move the “Healing Stones” from where the two stand in Wahiawa; they made no decision to perhaps not move them for a time between three and six months and after that time, to take up again the question of those rocks.

When ayes and nays were asked for per the request explained earlier by Mrs. Julie Judd Swanzy and added to with small changes made by Mrs. F. A. Potter, there were three members who were opposed to the changes.

The decision by the association agreed upon that day, was in accordance with the decision by the President of the Board of Health, F. E. Trotter, that there would be no action upon on the matter of the rocks and that they’d be left where they stand now without being moved. With this decision by the Daughters of Hawaii, the ones who have responsibility over the rocks, dashed was the hope and request of 400 citizens of Wahiawa made to this association in a petition to remove the rocks from Wahiawa.

Another subject considered and decided upon by the association was this: there shall be no monuments built upon heiau. At that meeting, announced were pledges of $588, and cash donations of $1712, and funds of $341.72 for the restoration of that palace in Kailua, Kona, Hawaii [Hulihee].

Because of the rumor that the enthusiasm over the healing powers of the rocks are dwindling, which was known because less people go to worship the stones and because of less donations, this is the reason for the postponement by the association on action to be taken in regard to the rocks, with their belief that perhaps in a short few months the craze of the people over worshiping them will decrease drastically.

At that meeting of the association, there were many letters read by the President, Mrs. Swanzy, in front of the members gathered there, from different people dealing with the stones.

One of these letters was a petition by 400 people of Wahiawa asking to remove these rocks from there; three of the people who signed their names to the document asked that their names not be publicized and to take out their names from the list; there was a letter against the moving of the rocks to the Bishop Museum, where the stones would just be a “Collection” there; in another letter, it was asked to move the rocks to an area near the new road in Koko Head.

Mrs. Charles Clark asked to return these stones to the grounds of Kukaniloko; her idea was opposed by the majority of the members for the reason that the ancient history of these stones have nothing to do with the history dealing with the alii born at Kukaniloko, and therefore, it is not right to move them there. The rocks were moved to Kukaniloko at the order of Galbraith, because he thought they might be broken up where they stood beneath the stream.  The association does not want to return the stones there; they have been something much cared for by the Filipinos and others, and other stones of Kukaniloko have been cracked because of candles placed upon them, and the grounds are full of rotting fruits and flowers; and seeing those things which marred the beauty of the area was why they were moved to where they stand now. Those stones will not be considered again for return to Kukaniloko.

As for the $3000 in the bank, it is from donations made by people who went to worship the stones, but the association has not agreed to take a cent of the money, but it will instead be appropriated for use for works benefiting the people of Wahiawa.

(Kuokoa, 11/24/1927, p. 4)

E WAIHOIA ANA NO NA POHAKU KUPUA MA KO LAUA WAHI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 52, Aoao 4. Novemaba 24, 1927.

The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, and the stone awa bowl, 1919.

SEEING ONCE AGAIN THE MUSEUM AT KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL.

Twenty years or more has past since I first saw exhibits of the antiquities of Hawaii nei and the tiny islands of Polynesia that are stored in that building, and it is of great value to those who wish to see, and it is true, there are more things stored there from when I first saw it; and there were things which shocked me while other things made me sad.

When I arrived at the museum, it was already filled with foreigners and locals going upstairs and downstairs, and soldiers were the majority, from the military ships docked those days; officers as well as enlisted men returning and going back to the battlefield, they were awestruck; and being that there was only three hours allowed for going around, and while I looked, peeped, and peered here and there, I looked at my watch and more than an hour had past, and here I was on the first floor with so much more of the building to see; therefore, I tried to quicken my pace so that I see things; but if you intended to see everything, you would not be able to do that walking around the whole day because there are so many things that catch your attention and you’d spend some minutes looking at them; and because I wanted to read the explanations and all of the stories, minutes were spent there.

There were all types of fish, birds, and fruits, war implements of all sorts of that time, and they were amazing to see; plus the animals of the land and the sea, it was as if they were living.

On the second floor were the thrones of the beloved monarchs of Hawaii nei who passed, and it was painful in my gut to see this touching sight; and their portraits hung all about, looked as if they were watching you; yes, aloha, aloha for the chiefs of the land.

The time was going quickly, and I was intent on seeing everything, and yet the time was short.

With every step on the third floor, everything was fascinating to see, and looking blow, the winding stairs were just so beautiful and everything was kept so nicely. But amongst everything I saw, there were but two most important things: the first being the thrones and all of their belongings, and the second was a huge stone which weighed more or less a ton; when I entered and met the greeter, I was given a piece of tin stamped with a number, and was asked to leave my hat and coat, and then I stood at the base of the stairs thinking where should I go first; that is when I entered the room on the mauka side of the building, greatly delighted by everything until I reached the place where the great stone stood, and I was astonished at the look and appearance of this stone;  as if it was something I saw before, but when; that is what I thought to myself; and because I was very unclear about it, I looked here and there and I saw a haole sitting at a desk reading a book; I gave my aloha and he looked at me and asked if there was something he could do for me; I said yes, if he could explain to me the story of the stone.

“Yes,” he said, “that stone is the grinding stone of the Hawaiians in the old days; it was upon that stone that adzes were sharpened, and that is the reason for that smooth indentation on the top.”

While I was listening to the explanation of that fine friend, my eyes were set directly upon that stone, and that is when I saw the description printed below it; I immediately left him and I went to read, and I was shocked and for several minutes I stood there, astounded that I met up again with this rock after a span of 55 years gone by.

That label explained that this rock was sent from Kilauea, Kauai, when George R. Ewart was boss of the Kilauea sugar plantation, in 1897, and then I went and joined my friend, and told him the truth about that stone, and its name, and its function; it wasn’t a grindstone like what he believed; and as he heard my story he began to write.

Therefore my news loving friends, so that your confusion over this stone is put to an end, and for when you go to visit this building, you won’t fail to meet up with this rock, and you will have an understanding through this story I am revealing:

The name of this stone is Kanoa, and this was a awa bowl [Kanoa awa] for the alii of that time, and this is the reason why that depression was made right on the top, and there is a place between Kilauea and Pilaa called Kanoa until this day,  named for this stone; and from this spot, the sto0ne was taken away by the boss George R. Ewart when he was the head of that sugar plantation, and this place became the graveyard for the Portuguese, and a Catholic Church [Saint Sylvester Church] stands there until today near the government road.

It was 55 years ago that I first set my eyes on this stone, during those days when the land was forested, and beneath a pandanus tree was where this stone was placed; its height from the ground was perhaps a foot or so, and this Kanoa awa was crafted with great skill and at its side was the cup [apu], which was a smaller stone fashioned like an awa cup.

From what my kupuna told me, this Kanoa belonged to some chiefs and where the Kanoa was left was where a great house one stood, which was a place where the alii of the old times would enjoy themselves. And I was also informed of the alii to whom belonged the Kanoa; Kamoku was the man, and this is a hill that stands to this day in the middle of a field, and should a malihini go and see that Catholic church mentioned earlier, that place is Kanoa, and if you turn to look inland, about two miles away a hill stands like a heap of lava, and below all around it grow all sorts of plants, and from the middle until the top is pilipiliula grass, and today on its peak is a grove of tall pine trees planted after the owner of this land, Mr. C. Bertelman, died and his body was brought and buried some years ago; as for the chiefly woman, she was Kahili, and this is a land immediately seaward of this place, with a huge estuary where fishes of all types swim today.

Should the alii want to have fun, the chiefess went up with poi and fish, and Kamoku went down with the intoxicating awa of the uplands of Kahua-a, bundles of oopu fish, mokihana lei of Kahihikolo, dark shrimps [opae kuauli] of Kaluaokalani, and it was in this house that they would enjoy themselves with their people; that is the whole story dealing with this stone, a awa bowl for the chiefs.

If Mr. George R. Ewart had known of yet another stone that is in Kilauea in Kalihiwai, which rings like a bell, and it is rounded flat, and its sound can be heard for a mile or more if it is struck with a hammer or a rock in other times, and it was something played with by school children; then it would have probably been taken by Mr. Ewart to the museum to be viewed.

I give my appreciation to him being that in that year that this stone was sent, I was working at that sugar plantation, but I had no prior knowledge of this until I saw it once again in this museum.

With the Editor and the metal type setting boys go my valediction.

Me ka mahalo,

Charles K. Nawaiula.

Honolulu, Dec. 2, 1919.

(Kuokoa, 12/12/1919, p. 3)

IKE HOU MA KA HALE HOIKEIKE O NA MEA KAHIKO MA KE KULA O KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 50, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 12, 1919.The

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum rules for patrons, 1903.

THE RULES OF ORDER OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT.

We kindly request of the visitors to leave their bags, canes, umbrellas, and so forth at the place to leave them by the entrance. Gentlemen are to remove their hats, and the Japanese guests are to leave their “wooden shoes” on the lanai.

Children are not allowed to enter unsupervised by adults who are to keep them in control and to watch them lest something gets damaged.

Do not smoke withing the building; do not spit on the floors. Dogs are not permitted in the building.

The bringing in of food into the building is not allowed; if here for an extended period, they must, if hungry, go outside to eat.

[This came from “A Handbook for Visitors to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum of Polynesian Ethnography and Natural History” Honolulu 1903. I just came across this today and thought it was interesting.

In Japanese, the only big difference seems to be that it says if a child damages the building or one of the exhibits, then the accompanying adult must take responsibility. And those “wooden shoes” must have been troublesome, because it appears to be talked about in all four other languages as well!]

(“A Handbook for Visitors to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum of Polynesian Ethnography and Natural History” Honolulu 1903.)

"A Handbook for Visitors to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum of Polynesian Ethnography and Natural History" Honolulu 1903. Prepared by William T. Brigham, Director of the Museum.

“A Handbook for Visitors to the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum of Polynesian Ethnography and Natural History” Honolulu 1903. Prepared by William T. Brigham, Director of the Museum.

Samuel Kamakaia’s Royal Order of Kalakaua to the Bishop Museum, 1919.

PRESENTATION MEDAL OF KALAKAUA TO KAMAKAIA.

The silver medal of King Kalakaua [Royal Order of Kalakaua] presented to Samuel Kamakaia, one of the members of the Bana Hawaii [Royal Hawaiian Band] is now in the possession of Malulani Beckley Kahea, who is also a band member; it is his to care for until the time comes for it to go to another member of the band, although according to Kamakaia’s wishes, it should be returned to the Bishop Museum.

Rightfully, this medal will be given to James K. Pohina, to oldest member of the Bana Hawaii active today. In 1883, this medal was awarded to Kamakaia, a gift from the King for his work as the leader of the band. In 1869, Kamakaia joined the band, and two years ago he left.

(Kuokoa, 7/4/1919, p. 1)

KA MEDALA MAKANA A KALAKAUA IA KAMAKAIA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 27, Aoao 1. Iulai 4, 1919.