Flora Hayes at the Bishop Museum, 1965.

Flora Hayes is translating letters of Isle kings, queens and princes

By DENBY FAWCETT

Flora Kaai Hayes, who couldn’t pass her academic course at Kamehameha School for Girls in 1913, has become one of the Bishop Museum’s most avid scholars of Hawaiiana.

Mrs. Hayes, a former seven-term member of the Territorial House of Representatives, is translating from Hawaiian the letters of King Kalakaua, Queen Kapiolani and Prince Kuhio.

“I was so mischievous that the officials at Kamehameha wouldn’t pass me fromthe academic department,” she said.

Sneaking off the campus to buy see-moi, cakes, candy and pie for her dormitory pals, who claimed they were starving from the institutional food, was one of her special pranks. Continue reading

O Kamakaeha ia, o Liliu, o Loloku, 1901.

O MAKAAINANA WHO TRULY LOVE THE CHIEF. ARISE, MAKE HASTE.

Show our true aloha for our Royal Mother by going to see Her on Her birthday that will be observed this coming Monday, September 2, from 12 o’clock until 1 p.m. There is only one hour to go in and shake hands with Her. This will be a large royal audience given to the public, from the kamaaina to the malihini, from the lofty ones to the lowly, from the rich to the poor, for the haole and we, Hawaii’s own. The great desire of our beloved Queen is for Her to see us, Her own makaainana going to see Her. Continue reading

Hula painting by Cogswell found in California, 1939.

Cogswell’s Model: J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., is anxious to know if the Hawaiian girl who posed for this painting by William Cogswell in 1892 is still living in Hawaii.—Star-Bulletin photo.

Rare Old Painting Found By Phillips in California

Another one of the works of William Cogswell, whose paintings of King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani are hung in Iolani palace, was discovered by J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., during his recent business trip to the coast. Continue reading

Hiiaka calls out, “I stand up to leave…” 1862.

[Found under: “HE MOOOLELO NO HIIAKAIKAPOLIOPELE. Helu 1.”]

Hiiakaikapoliopele looks at her elder sisters who hang their heads down, they being the ones who were sent to fetch the man; they are the ones who hang their heads, and Hiiakaikapoliopele chants out thus:

Ke ku nei au e hele, Continue reading

David Alapai and his mele inoa for Pele, 1919.

INTERESTING MATTERS PERTAINING TO THE LAVA SEASIDE OF ALIKA

When lava gushed forth upon the land of Alika, nearby the “building filled with tons of awa.” Sleeping there in that place was a man intoxicated on awa, and it was with great effort that this man drunken on awa escaped with his life. Just as that man got away did the “lava” engulf that building with its tons of awa. Right makai side of that awa storehouse the man had tied up his donkey and it is was seen that the lava had flowed off course and left behind this donkey belonging to that awa storehouse watchman. Several days later when that man was talking about his near escape from the lava, he told this funny story. “Pele does not have interest in Donkey meat, but she likes drinking awa. She waited a bit for me to get away from that building and then she drank all of our awa up, and to show her appreciation for this awa drinking party, she left behind my Donkey.” Continue reading