Praise for Kuhio in mele, 2021

Did you see yesterday’s Nuhou Monday post from Bishop Museum on praise for Prince Kuhio through mele? Check it out by clicking here!

Death announcement for Zerubabela Kapule, aka Zakaria Kapule, 1923.

Did you see the Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? Here is a obituary for Zerubabela Kapule who was also known as Zakaria [Zachariah].

Obituaries

ZERUBABELA KAPULE

Zerubabela Kapule, retired and pensioned member of the Hawaiian band, died last Thursday evening at his home, Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project at Bishop Museum, 2021.

Did you see the latest Nūhou Monday post from Bishop Museum? It mentions Ka Nūhou, the Hawaiian language newsletter put out by the club, Hui Aloha ʻĀina Tuahine at University of Hawaii at Mānoa. That was 49 years ago! Click here for the Nūhou Monday post from He Aupuni Palapala!

E na makua Hawaiʻi me na kupuna Hawaiʻi

…ʻO ʻoukou no na kumu helu ekahi o ka ʻolelo Hawaiʻi. Ka ʻolelo i aʻo ʻia mai ka puke mai, oʻohe no e like me ka ʻolelo mai koʻoukou waha mai.

Hawaiian parents and grandparents, you are the best teachers of the Hawaiian language.
The language taught from books is not like the language that comes from your mouths.
—A plea written by Haunani Bernardino, editor of Ka Nuhou, an English-Hawaiian newsletter.

Haunani Bernardino

Nuulani Atkins

Lurline Naone

Bill Wilson

By Arlene Lum
Star-Bulletinn Writer

Hawaiian is a living language and NOT a foreign one. And if a group of University of Hawaii students had their way, Hawaiian youngsters would be bilingual.

There are only 5,000 people in the State now who can speak the beautiful, musical language and only 150 at the University are trying to learn.

The reason?

“We were brought up feeling ashamed of our heritage,” according to Nuulani Atkins, a senior in his third year of language study. “I hated myself. I hated the Hawaiians. I felt inferior.” Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

O Ku! O Ka! O Ku! O Ka!

Patience Bacon standing in front of Hawaiian Hall at the 7th Annual Bernice Pauahi Bishop Awards Dinner, where she was presented with the Robert J. Pfeiffer Medal. July 23, 2005. Bishop Museum Archives. SP 215864.
He Hoʻālohaloha no Patience Elmay Namakauahoaokawenaulaokalaniikiikikalaninui Wiggin Bacon.

An expression of aloha for our dear Aunty Pat who left on the path of no return on January 23, 2021, at the age of 100. Within her lived the legacies of those committed to preserving the invaluable knowledge of the past. Her own dedication to this noble calling came with a life devoted to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, hula, mele, and cultural knowledge…

[Continuation of the words of aloha for Aunty Pat put forth by Bishop Museum today can be found by clicking here.]

Flora Hayes at the Bishop Museum, 1965.

Flora Hayes is translating letters of Isle kings, queens and princes

By DENBY FAWCETT

Flora Kaai Hayes, who couldn’t pass her academic course at Kamehameha School for Girls in 1913, has become one of the Bishop Museum’s most avid scholars of Hawaiiana.

Mrs. Hayes, a former seven-term member of the Territorial House of Representatives, is translating from Hawaiian the letters of King Kalakaua, Queen Kapiolani and Prince Kuhio.

“I was so mischievous that the officials at Kamehameha wouldn’t pass me fromthe academic department,” she said.

Sneaking off the campus to buy see-moi, cakes, candy and pie for her dormitory pals, who claimed they were starving from the institutional food, was one of her special pranks. Continue reading

O Kamakaeha ia, o Liliu, o Loloku, 1901.

O MAKAAINANA WHO TRULY LOVE THE CHIEF. ARISE, MAKE HASTE.

Show our true aloha for our Royal Mother by going to see Her on Her birthday that will be observed this coming Monday, September 2, from 12 o’clock until 1 p.m. There is only one hour to go in and shake hands with Her. This will be a large royal audience given to the public, from the kamaaina to the malihini, from the lofty ones to the lowly, from the rich to the poor, for the haole and we, Hawaii’s own. The great desire of our beloved Queen is for Her to see us, Her own makaainana going to see Her. Continue reading

Hula painting by Cogswell found in California, 1939.

Cogswell’s Model: J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., is anxious to know if the Hawaiian girl who posed for this painting by William Cogswell in 1892 is still living in Hawaii.—Star-Bulletin photo.

Rare Old Painting Found By Phillips in California

Another one of the works of William Cogswell, whose paintings of King Kalakaua and Queen Liliuokalani are hung in Iolani palace, was discovered by J. T. Phillips, general manager of the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer Co., during his recent business trip to the coast. Continue reading

Hiiaka calls out, “I stand up to leave…” 1862.

[Found under: “HE MOOOLELO NO HIIAKAIKAPOLIOPELE. Helu 1.”]

Hiiakaikapoliopele looks at her elder sisters who hang their heads down, they being the ones who were sent to fetch the man; they are the ones who hang their heads, and Hiiakaikapoliopele chants out thus:

Ke ku nei au e hele, Continue reading