David Alapai and his mele inoa for Pele, 1919.

INTERESTING MATTERS PERTAINING TO THE LAVA SEASIDE OF ALIKA

When lava gushed forth upon the land of Alika, nearby the “building filled with tons of awa.” Sleeping there in that place was a man intoxicated on awa, and it was with great effort that this man drunken on awa escaped with his life. Just as that man got away did the “lava” engulf that building with its tons of awa. Right makai side of that awa storehouse the man had tied up his donkey and it is was seen that the lava had flowed off course and left behind this donkey belonging to that awa storehouse watchman. Several days later when that man was talking about his near escape from the lava, he told this funny story. “Pele does not have interest in Donkey meat, but she likes drinking awa. She waited a bit for me to get away from that building and then she drank all of our awa up, and to show her appreciation for this awa drinking party, she left behind my Donkey.” Continue reading

Advertisements

Forty years ago, Brothers Cazimero May Day Concert at the Shell! 1978.

[Found under: “Show Biz: Wayne Harada”]

Hana hou

For You a Lei Day Program. The Brothers Cazimero, who just appeared in Ken Rosene’s Hawaii Contemporary Music Festival, will do an “encore” of sorts come May Day. Yep, on Lei Day—May 1—Robert and Roland Cazimero will headline a May Day concert at the Waikiki Shell. Continue reading

On kake and Kauikeaouli and Kalama and Kaahumanu, 1896.

[Found under: “NA WAHI PANA A KAULANA O HONOLULU, OAHU NEI, I UHIIA I KA LEPO A NALOWALE LOA HOI I KEIA AU HOU.”]

KAHALEULUHE

5.—Kahaleuluhe was where the Anglican Church stands today, and its stature is hard to picture today. This was a Royal residence during the time of Kamehameha III, the kindhearted Alii who was shown affection through words of kake, because of the fear Kalama had lest she be killed by Kaahumanu and Kinau, Continue reading

Founder’s Day, 1894.

IT IS FOUNDER’S DAY.

FORMAL OPENING OF GIRLS’ SCHOOL AND THE MUSEUM ANNEX.

Exercises In Bishop Hall—Addresses By Col. W. F. Allen, Mrs. Haalelea, Miss Pope.

This is Kamehameha School Founder’s Day. It is the anniversary of the birth of that noble woman, Bernice Pauahi Bishop. This Hawaiian calendar feature was marked by the formal opening of the Kamehameha School for Girls and the Chas. R. Bishop Museum Annex.

The exercises began at 2 o’clock this afternoon. With the literary program, the sports and viewing the new school and the Annex, to say nothing of the manual training department, there were visitors on the grounds till after 3 o’clock. Continue reading

E o, e ka wahine hele la o Kaiona! 1894.

Day of Remembrance for the Chiefess Pauahi.

This past Wednesday was a grand day indeed on the campus of the Kamehameha Schools, as usual. In the early morning the students went together upon large buses, as banners waved and the instruments of their band sounded, along with flowers and greenery, they maneuvered the roads headed to the Royal mausoleum in the uplands of Maunaala. Continue reading

Pueo found in Kalihi, 1902.

SCARCE NATIVE OWLS ARE FOUND IN KALIHI VALLEY

THE HAWAIIAN OWL.  Photo by Williams.

A NEST of four baby owls was discovered about three months ago by Dr. George Huddy in the Kalihi valley behind his residence. The discovery of the quartette of owlets is important in that few of the species have been found in late years. Three of them died shortly after being taken into captivity, but the oldest of the lot lived and is growing into a fine bird, and is at present about the size of a small pullet. He is thoroughly domesticated and makes himself perfectly at home in the residence of Dr. Huddy, mingling with the people without fear.

The three dead ones were taken in charge by Mr. Bryan, Professor Brigham’s assistant at the Bishop Museum, and they are now stuffed and form a group with one brought to the museum about four years ago. It has been said at the museum that the owls are exceedingly rare and are valuable in the preserved state for the museum.

The pet eats mice as well as raw meat. Dr. Huddy was quite troubled as to the manner in which the owl digested the bones and was rewarded a short time ago when the owl retired to a corner and began retching. Soon a quantity of bones issued from his throat, and the youngster then resumed his eating of further food.

The owl is of the “horned” species. When approached by some one he does not know two groups of feathers on the back rise upward in a threatening manner and remain in that position until the stranger retires. If it is some one he knows the feathers fall back and he courts their attention.

The owner of the rare bird states that none of his family have known of the existence of such owls in the Kalihi valley for the past forty years. They were at one time plentiful. The native for the owl is pueo. When fully grown it is the size of a large hen or the alala, or crow. Its feathers are mottled, its eyes exceedingly large and the claws are sharp like those of a cat. In appearance the owl’s head is very much like that of a cat. It catches mice, small birds and young chickens, on which it lives. The feathers were formerly made into very handsome kahilis.

In ancient times the owl was thought to be a god and was worshipped by multitudes. Some families looked upon the appearance of an owl near their habitation as a warning of approaching death; others as the coming of good luck. On the hills back of Kalapu, in Manoa Valley, beyond the bluff on which the Castle residence is located, owls once inhabited the caves in great numbers.

One of the legends of Manoa Valley gives the owl great prominence as god. The legend of Kahalaopuna shows that the owl was looked upon as such, a certain owl being known as the guardian of the beautiful maiden.

[Does anyone know of kahili made with pueo feathers?]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/11/1902, p. 5)

SCARCE NATIVE OWLS ARE FOUND IN KALIHI VALLEY

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXVII, Number 12, Page 5. February 11, 1902.

 

In the collections of the Bishop Museum, 1903.

THE PEN WITH WHICH ROOSEVELT SIGNED THE FIRE CLAIMS BILL OF HAWAII.

Washington, Jan. 23. The pen with which the President signed the Hawaiian Fire Claims Bill [Bila Poho Ahi Hawaii] is a remarkable pen. This pen was made from the quill of a feather of a wild eagle, and that feather was taken from a war headdress of a wild Arapaho Indian. This pen is now in the care of Pratt to be placed in the Bishop Museum of Kamehameha in Honolulu.

This pen was gifted to the Hon. William A. Richards, a former Governor of Wyoming, and currently a Commissioner of Public Lands [Aina Aupuni]. This feather was taken by Richards from the headdress of an Arapaho Indian 18 years ago. He thought it was the right time for this feather to be put to some important use for Hawaii, therefore, he ordered one of the workers in his office to fashion the feather into a pen. Let it be remembered that this person who was given the feather to make a pen is a man of much seniority who was working in that office for fifty-one years.

(Aloha Aina, 2/7/1903, p. 1)

KA PENI A RUSEVALA I KAKAU AI I KA BILA POHO AHI O HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 7, 1903.