Publication of “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” 1956.

Hawaiians Were Gourmets When It Came to Fish

By CLARICE TAYLOR

The Hawaiian pitied the white man as an uncultivated person when he first saw the white man eating fish.

The white man discarded the portions of the fish which the Hawaiians considered delicacies—such as the head, the eyes, the entrails, the skin and the little dark portions next to the bone.

Then, too, the white man only ate cooked fish. He had no idea of the choice flavor of fresh fish eaten immediately after taking it from the water.

All this and much more is told in a new publication, Native Use of Fish in Hawaii by Margaret Titcomb, librarian, and Mary Kawena Pukui, associate in Hawaiian Culture at Bishop Museum.

Published in N. Z.

Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a supplement to the Journal of Polynesian Society and was published by the Society in New Zealand.

The books will soon be on sale at the Bishop Museum Bookshop.

Although Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a scientific publication, its text is easy to read for the layman and contains much fascinating material on how the Hawaiian at fish, his major source of protein. Continue reading

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The beginning of Mary Kawena Pukui & Margaret Titcomb’s list of sea creatures, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

Here below is a list of names of some Hawaiian sea creatures that are written down in a book of names of the Kamehameha Museum.

The director of the Museum wrote that if some of our oldsters can write down the names and descriptions of the fishes.

That director wrote that he will pay the cost of one year’s subscription to the newspaper Ka Hoku o Hawaii, if he receives some fish names and a description of them, like if it is long, or striped, and so forth.

Here below is a list of names of some fishes sent in by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui and Mrs. Makalika Titcomb [Margaret Titcomb]. Continue reading

Speaking of fishes, here is a list of fish names put out by Margaret Titcomb, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Below is a list of names of some Hawaiian fishes that are written in a book of names at the Kamehameha Museum [Bishop Museum]. Continue reading

This is some fishing story! 1893.

LETTERS

[We do not wish to carry the responsibility for the errors of the ideas printed below this title by our writers.]

The Starving Ones in the Upland are Saved, a Strange Fish was Landed.

O Kuokoa Newspaper

Aloha to you and your metal type setting boys, and your Editor.

Please take around those words placed above.

On Monday, the 4th of this month, a large strange fish was landed in Ewa; a fish of the deep sea.

And this is the story on that early morning of that day mentioned above. Continue reading

George M. Keone reports the latest from Ewa, 1913.

NEWS OF ALOHA OF THE VOICE-HUSHING MARINE ANIMAL OF EWA

O Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha to you and the hands of your ship carrying news:—Please have room for me to put my baggage, and if you agree to it, do paddle our canoe:

Hoe Puna i  ka waa aloha a ka ino,
Haukeuke i na hala o Kookoolau,
Eha e, Eha la,
Eha i ka makili kui a Kaulumano.
Hala ae ka maka walu ihe a ke ae,
Ku i ka pahu ku a ka awaawa,
Hananee ke kikala o ko Hilo kini,
Hoi luuluu i ke one o Hanakahi,
I ka pololo wahine o ka lua,
Wahine kui lei lehua o Olaa,
Laahia hewa hoi au i ko lei,
E ke aloha e! Continue reading

Casualties from exploding lava, 1924.

MET WITH DEATH FROM ROCKS FROM THE THE LAVA

Two Haole Soldiers Disappear Without Being Found—It is Believed They Too Were Victims of the Lava

These are the two haole soldiers who disappeared without their bodies being found from the morning of this past Sunday. The two were last seen in an area near the crater, before the powerful lava explosion.

From the left is Edward J. Hinman, and to his right is Howard J. Simmons, they are both soldiers of the engineers of Leilehua, and they were camping at Kilauea, Hawaii.

As per the very latest news received from Hilo town, Madame Pele is surely at it these days, displaying her wondrous power which causes fear in a great many of Hawaii’s people who went to see the volcanic activity.

Amongst the visitors on this past Sunday was one who met with tragedy, after breaking both his legs and being burned by the hot ash from the lava, that being Truman T. Taylor, the bookkeeper of Pahala Sugar Plantation. Continue reading

Escaping rocks thrown into the sky, 1924.

The Deeds of Madame Pele, the Woman of the Pit, are Wondrous

Many Lives are Spared
From the Rocks of Lava

Rocks and Ash are Thrown into the Sky When the Lava Exploded This Past Tuesday

HILO, May 13.—Many lives were spared this afternoon, because Thomas E. Boles, the superintendent of Hawaii national park, foresaw the trouble and forbade people from going to see the crater of Halemaumau, just minutes before the powerful explosion of lava, throwing huge rocks to a distance of 2000 feet. Volcanic ash was shot 1800 feet in the sky above the crater. Continue reading