Restriction on fishing, 1922.

Notice of Tabu Fish.

By this, notice is given to all who sees this, as per what is designated in Section 614 of the Assembled Laws of Hawaii, 1915; I, the one named below, the owner of the fishery, known as the sea of “KEAUAU,” from the former property of the Alii William Charles Lunalilo, that being the sea in the Ili aina of Kapahulu, select and set aside for myself, an only for my own use, the fish called, “amaama,” from within those seas. All who take without my permission this fish that I make tabu, will be prosecuted.

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Whaling ended in 1859?

A Large Pamuela

Off the island of Lanai this past Tuesday, the whaling ship Triton caught a whale called a Pamuela [sperm whale], and the value of the boiled down 100 barrels of oil is a blessing for the seafaring boys. The oil from this kind of fish is one of the best, and it fetches a high price. Its oil is not like that of the other whales of the sea. The number of barrels are but a few, but the $7,500 gain is great. They return weighted down, their pockets rustling.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 3/12/1891, p. 2)

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 148, Aoao 2. Maraki 12, 1891.

Another death announcement for Hiram Palohau Kahele, 1920.

Honolulu’s Hunter of Sharks Is Dead

Hiram P. Kahele, known to many as “Buck” Kahele, died at 9:45 o’clock yesterday morning at his home, 10 Dewey Court, Waikiki, after a week’s illness. Kahele was a victim of broncho-pneumonia, following influenza. Continue reading

Hiram Kahele and shark fishing, 1915.

LARGE SHARK CAUGHT OUTSIDE THE HARBOR

On Tuesday last week, a large shark was caught right outside the harbor, by some malihini world traveller, along with some Hawaiian boys who went with them on a tugboat [??? waapa hukihuki].

These people left the Young Brothers [Hoahanau Young] boathouse while trolling with a dead horse which was supplied by the electric car company. Continue reading