Waianuenue coverage, 1896.

[Found under: “KELA A ME KEIA.”]

From the sugar plantation of Kealia, Kauai, Continue reading

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History of volcanic activities and why the newspapers need to be rescanned as clearly as possible, 1868–for the present, for the future.

[Found under: “Ke Ahi Pele Nui ma Hawaii. NA OLAI KUPINAI. KE KAI HOEE NUI! MAKE WELIWELI MA KAU! Na Palapala a na Makamaka mai Hawaii mai, eia iho malalo:”]

On Thursday at 3 in the afternoon, that being the 2nd of this April, there came a great powerful earthquake, and people could not stand upright, and so too the animals. The soil of the earth spew up into the sky like smoke and hills tumbled down; large trees fell, and some of the valleys were filled, and houses fell; the number of houses which fell numbered 30 or more; and 3 churches fell, the churches of Kahuku and Waiohinu and Punaluu; and there is a large pit at Kahuku that is 80 feet in circumference and 350 feet or more deep, and from within this pit rose steam like the steam of the volcanic crater; the distance from the port of Kaalualu to this pit is 6 miles or so; and there are many other deeds carried out by God. Continue reading

Kamehameha IV travels to the west, 1856.

THE CIRCUIT OF THE KING.

It was heard that the King went from  here and on the next day landed at Waimea, Kauai, and that night sailed for Niihau, and landed at Nonopapa on Saturday [la hoomalolo]. They were there on the Sabbath, and they congregated and worshiped Jehovah on that day. On the next day, they rode horses and went fishing; there are a 100 or more horses on Niihau; they caught a lot of fish. Continue reading

Death of William Kamauoha Kekumano, 1917.

THAT FAMILIAR SON OF SOUTH KONA HAS GONE

On Thursday of last week, perhaps half an hour after his brother-in-law arrived in Napoopoo, the life of Wiliama Kamauoha Kekumano wore out, and at only 45 years old. Continue reading

More alii going to fish for upapalu, 1869.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Fond of fishing.—The moonlit nights of this past week were spent by some makaainana and alii by going fishing outside of Honolulu Harbor, in lagoons and other places they wanted to fish. The fishes they caught  were upapalu, u-u, aweoweo, moi, awa, and alalauwa. Continue reading