Giant Powder is not only bad for the environment, 1882.

DIED WHILE GATHERING FISH USING GIANT POWDER.

Please accept my bundle that I put before you, and it shall be you that will give it your all out amongst the public so that our friends who enjoy news will know about it, from the rising sun at Haehae to Lehua where the sun is held back and done. And this is it: Continue reading

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Fishing using explosives, 1895.

The Blasting of Fish Prevails.

Mr. Editor:

On the travels of the Circuit Court Judge of Maui, to Kaupo, Kipahulu, Hana, and all the way to the Koolau cliffs of Maui, to ask for money for the building of Wailuku, and we were lucky in what money was collected. I was one who went along on this journey. When we reached Kipahulu, to Hakuole’s place, a policeman, with his son, Kimo Hakuole who is a school teacher; the locals were very hospitable. Continue reading

Publication of “Native Use of Fish in Hawaii,” 1956.

Hawaiians Were Gourmets When It Came to Fish

By CLARICE TAYLOR

The Hawaiian pitied the white man as an uncultivated person when he first saw the white man eating fish.

The white man discarded the portions of the fish which the Hawaiians considered delicacies—such as the head, the eyes, the entrails, the skin and the little dark portions next to the bone.

Then, too, the white man only ate cooked fish. He had no idea of the choice flavor of fresh fish eaten immediately after taking it from the water.

All this and much more is told in a new publication, Native Use of Fish in Hawaii by Margaret Titcomb, librarian, and Mary Kawena Pukui, associate in Hawaiian Culture at Bishop Museum.

Published in N. Z.

Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a supplement to the Journal of Polynesian Society and was published by the Society in New Zealand.

The books will soon be on sale at the Bishop Museum Bookshop.

Although Native Uses of Fish in Hawaii is a scientific publication, its text is easy to read for the layman and contains much fascinating material on how the Hawaiian at fish, his major source of protein. Continue reading

The beginning of Mary Kawena Pukui & Margaret Titcomb’s list of sea creatures, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

Here below is a list of names of some Hawaiian sea creatures that are written down in a book of names of the Kamehameha Museum.

The director of the Museum wrote that if some of our oldsters can write down the names and descriptions of the fishes.

That director wrote that he will pay the cost of one year’s subscription to the newspaper Ka Hoku o Hawaii, if he receives some fish names and a description of them, like if it is long, or striped, and so forth.

Here below is a list of names of some fishes sent in by Mrs. Mary Kawena Pukui and Mrs. Makalika Titcomb [Margaret Titcomb]. Continue reading

Speaking of fishes, here is a list of fish names put out by Margaret Titcomb, 1940.

TO PEOPLE WHO KNOW THE  NAMES OF VARIOUS SEA CREATURES AND THEIR DESCRIPTIONS

(Written by M. TITCOMB)

Below is a list of names of some Hawaiian fishes that are written in a book of names at the Kamehameha Museum [Bishop Museum]. Continue reading

This is some fishing story! 1893.

LETTERS

[We do not wish to carry the responsibility for the errors of the ideas printed below this title by our writers.]

The Starving Ones in the Upland are Saved, a Strange Fish was Landed.

O Kuokoa Newspaper

Aloha to you and your metal type setting boys, and your Editor.

Please take around those words placed above.

On Monday, the 4th of this month, a large strange fish was landed in Ewa; a fish of the deep sea.

And this is the story on that early morning of that day mentioned above. Continue reading

Manuia Maunupau, old-time Kona fisherman, passes away, 1940.

Noted Isle Fisherman Who Taught Rulers, Will Be Buried Today

MANUIA MAUNUPAU

Manuia Maunupau Dies In Honolulu After Long Career On Kona Coast

A famous old-time Hawaiian fisherman, one who taught Island royalty the art, will be laid to rest here this afternoon when Manuia Maunupau of Kailua, Kona, is buried.

Mr. Maunupau died Sunday night at the home of his son, Thomas K. Maunupau, 3326 Hoolulu street, after an illness of three months. He was 68 years old and had come to Honolulu in February for medical treatment.

Born In Honolulu

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today at Silva’s mortuary, where the body has been on view since last night. Interment will take place Puea cemetery.

Mr. Maunupau was born in Honuakaha, this city, but spent his boyhood days in fishing at Kuhio and Kaupulehu, two of the old-time fishing villages in that section of Kona called “the waste and waterless Kekaha.”

Knew Waters

It was from his father, Maihui, that he learned the various methods of fishing. He knew the names and location of the koas or fishing grounds, particularly those surrounding the area know as Haleohi’u, “the house of many fish tails,” which is located between Keahole Point and Kuhio.

Mr. Maunupau knew the landmarks of these fishing grounds: their characteristics, such as depth, current and the kinds of fish that are found there. He knew the stars, current and the winds.He knew every rock and reef offshore and could steer a canoe or boat blindfolded along the west coast of Hawaii.

Royal Fisherman

For a short time, Manuia Maunupau was a mate on a schooner owned by George McDougall, who was then doing business in Kailua, Hawaii, more than 40 years ago, and which ran between West Hawaii ports and Honolulu.

J. B. Curts, manager of H. Hackfeld & Co., Ltd., of Kailua, Hawaii, hired him as a pilot to steer lumber vessels when they were…

(Honolulu Advertiser, 3/26/1940, p. 1)

Advertiser_3_26_1940_1.png

The Honolulu Advertiser, 84th Year, Number 19,145, Page 1. March 26, 1940.

Continue reading