Manuia Maunupau, old-time Kona fisherman, passes away, 1940.

Noted Isle Fisherman Who Taught Rulers, Will Be Buried Today

MANUIA MAUNUPAU

Manuia Maunupau Dies In Honolulu After Long Career On Kona Coast

A famous old-time Hawaiian fisherman, one who taught Island royalty the art, will be laid to rest here this afternoon when Manuia Maunupau of Kailua, Kona, is buried.

Mr. Maunupau died Sunday night at the home of his son, Thomas K. Maunupau, 3326 Hoolulu street, after an illness of three months. He was 68 years old and had come to Honolulu in February for medical treatment.

Born In Honolulu

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today at Silva’s mortuary, where the body has been on view since last night. Interment will take place Puea cemetery.

Mr. Maunupau was born in Honuakaha, this city, but spent his boyhood days in fishing at Kuhio and Kaupulehu, two of the old-time fishing villages in that section of Kona called “the waste and waterless Kekaha.”

Knew Waters

It was from his father, Maihui, that he learned the various methods of fishing. He knew the names and location of the koas or fishing grounds, particularly those surrounding the area know as Haleohi’u, “the house of many fish tails,” which is located between Keahole Point and Kuhio.

Mr. Maunupau knew the landmarks of these fishing grounds: their characteristics, such as depth, current and the kinds of fish that are found there. He knew the stars, current and the winds.He knew every rock and reef offshore and could steer a canoe or boat blindfolded along the west coast of Hawaii.

Royal Fisherman

For a short time, Manuia Maunupau was a mate on a schooner owned by George McDougall, who was then doing business in Kailua, Hawaii, more than 40 years ago, and which ran between West Hawaii ports and Honolulu.

J. B. Curts, manager of H. Hackfeld & Co., Ltd., of Kailua, Hawaii, hired him as a pilot to steer lumber vessels when they were…

(Honolulu Advertiser, 3/26/1940, p. 1)

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The Honolulu Advertiser, 84th Year, Number 19,145, Page 1. March 26, 1940.

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Fish prices regulated, 1918.

PRICES FOR FISHES ARE SET BY THE FOOD COMMISSIONER, CHILD.

This past Saturday, the rules of the food commissioner of Hawaii nei, Child, went into effect, in that the prices for different fishes will be set, not like before when fish was so expensive that some people could not afford fish for them and their families. Continue reading

Fish prices, 1918.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

Because of the very high prices for fish now, it has become very difficult to stock the aquarium outside of Waikiki with new fish, being that the fishermen always take their fish to the market to sell for a profit.

(Kuokoa, 2/8/1918, p. 4)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 8, 1918.

The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading

William Panui talks about fishing, 1989.

[Found under: “Storytelling now a respected art”]

William Panui: Fish tales

Pacific Islands: Reef fishing on the Big Island

William Panui was adopted by his grandparents and grew up on land the family owned at remote Keei Beach on the South Kona coast.

His grandfather—Lui Kauanoe Panui—only spoke Hawaiian and taught him the old ways of fishing. “The old techniques depended on what was available,” he said. “Now you can just go to the store and buy everything you need.” Continue reading