Birthday of Pauahi Lani, 1901.

Yesterday was the birthday of the Chiefess Mrs. Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Amongst the alii who have passed on, the alii Pauahi is one who will always live in the memories of her lahui. She accumulated her great wealth, and before her passing, she left most of it for the establishment of the School for the descendants of her people. Her fervent desire was for her lahui to be educated in English and knowledge necessary to  move them forward. Today there are hundreds who have been blessed by the knowledge gained from the schools. She has gone, but has left an unforgettable memorial which stands on her lands.

The chief Lunalilo has blessed the oldsters of his land; Queen Kapiolani, the women who are increasing her people, and Pauahi educates those offspring. Those are the chiefs who left unforgettable monuments, and their names will forever more echo upon the beloved walls of Hawaii nei.

(Kuokoa, 12/20/1901, p. 2)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 20, 1901.

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King Kalakaua’s 50th birthday celebration, with detailed tour of Iolani Palace, 1886.

THE KING’S BIRTHDAY.

The Palace Decorated for the Festivities.

Changes in the Pictures and Decorations Which Bring Out the Ancient History of the People.

In view of the festivities which commence this morning in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the natal day of His Majesty the King, Iolani Palace has undergone extensive preparations, the arrangements for the reception and entertainment of the guests being very complete. The balconies are bedecked in bunting embodying in bold and striking designs the colors of the Royal Standard. The principal entrance hall has been richly caparisoned at the hands of the upholsterer. Its walls have been newly hung with the valuable oil paintings, representing in life size the line of Hawaiian Sovereigns, with their consorts, from the time of Kamehameha I, downwards. The first position on the right is occupied by the portrait of the Conqueror, whose reign marked so momentous and epoch in the history of the Kingdom, and whose genius has so largely influenced its destiny. Side by side with this is the portrait of Kekauluohi, mother of King Lunalilo. Next are those of Kmehameha II and Queen Kaumaulii [Kamamalu ?]; Kamehameha III and Queen Kalama. On the left are arranged the portraits of Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma; Kamehameha V and King Lunalilo. The niches in the intervening spaces are each filled with some choice fern or other horticultural specimen. The general effect is extremely pleasing to the eye.

The throne room, in which the receptions will take place, has been newly furnished with a rich crimson carpet. On either side of the dais are suspended the Royal Orders of Kamehameha, Kalakaua, Kapiolani and the Crown of Hawaii, whilst the walls on every side are adorned with the numerous foreign decorations with which His Majesty has from time to time been invested. Each one is enclosed in a gilt oval frame, surmounted with the Royal Arms of the particular nation or empire to which the Order belongs. Leaving the throne room and crossing the central hall, one passes into the Blue room . The first object that meets the eye is a striking portrait of His Majesty in the uniform of the King’s Guard, with decorations. Facing this, to the right of the doorway, is one of Her Majesty the Queen, whilst on the left is a full length life size representation of Louis XIV of France, a work of rare value. The two former are from the brush of Charles Hasselmann. Among the many ornaments and curios is a set of vases in Benares brass ware, from India. To the rear of this apartment is the spacious dining hall, in which are displayed the massive silver table ware, each article bearing the Royal Arms in colored enamel. The furniture is early English in style, whilst some choice works of art adorns the walls. The latter include a portrait of Kamehameha IV, taken during the monarch’s boyhood, a companion pair of Napoleon I and IV, taken during that monarch’s boyhood, a companion pair of Napoleon I and Blucher; Admiral Thomas, who restored the country; the Czar Alexander II of Russia, and a graphic delineation of the crater of Kilauea by night, painted by Furneaux.

Ascending the grand staircase the upper hall is next entered, wherein the King’s Privy Council of State is usually held. The central figure is a bust in bronze of His Majesty the King; oil paintings and tasteful cabinets, containing articles of vertu,are disposed on either side, while the hall, which runs the entire width of the building, commands a magnificent vista of Pauoa Valley, the mountains, tier behind tier, with the different hues forming an effective background. The front window overlooks the Aliiolani Hale, and affords a distant view of the sea.

The private apartments of His Majesty lead off from the upper hall, and are located on the left, or Ewa, side of the Palace. In the front is the music room, in which the heavy style of furniture is discarded for a lighter and more appropriate one, the appointments being in excellent taste. In the room are a set of half a dozed water color drawings of special historic interest. They are illustrative of island scenes at a period prior to the advent of civilization, among which are representations of the large double canoes carrying the ancient idols; the heiaus or temples, both open and closed; grass houses, etc. These pictures are enlargements by R. C. Barnfield, after the originals taken on the spot by Captain Kotzbue, the Russian author of “Voyages in the Pacific.”

At the further end, facing the entrance, is a speaking likeness of Her Majesty the Queen, life size, in oil, by Furneaux. The room also contains a very fine painting of the crater of Kilauea, by Tavernier; a Belgian Princess, a daughter of the present King, together with cabinet photographs of Sir John and Lady Franklin. Less obtrusive, but of considerable interest, is a study in music, framed in a peculiarly chaste and unique manner.

Continue reading

The royals in Kona, 1879.

News from Kona.

O Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha oe:—

At 11 o’clock at night on the 19th of March, landed at the shore of Kailua nei were the King; Queen Kapiolani; Her Highness, R. Keelikolani; Minister of Finance S. K. Kaai; and some others. There were many of us gathered during those days. On the 22nd, the Queen went to the uplands of Kuahewa to see the troubles of Nawai, a blind man, to give him some help for his home that burned down. Continue reading

Uluniu, land of the former home of King Kalakaua, sold, 1915.

A PORTION OF THE HOUSE LOT OF KUHIO WAS SOLD.

That section of the land known as Uluniu which faces Kalakaua Avenue stretching from Ainahau to the area very close to the residence of Representative Kuhio, went to the new owner, Percy M. Pond, through a sale on the morning of this past Friday.

The land is almost six acres, and includes a majority of the house lot in Waikiki previously owned by Prince Kuhio. According to what is being said in public, it went for the price of $32,500. Continue reading

E o e Kuini Kapiolani! 1898.

HANOHANO NUUANU.

Hanohano Nuuanu aia iuka,
Kahiko i ka Ua Popokapa,
Ke nihi ae la Waolani,
A loaa maua i Kanenelu,
Wai auau a kuu aloha,
Me Eha hua hiu a wela,
Ua ahi ua wela Wananakoa,
I ka hooni a nei kupueu,
A he eueu au no Kahikina,
No na pali hulaana o Maui,
O ke ewe ia a o’u mau kupuna,
I lohe mai oe Koleakani,
Aulii ma hana a Piilani,
A he lani a he kupa no ka aina,
Haina ia mai ana ka puana,
Na Eha Hua hiu a Wela.

EHAHUA.

(Loea Kalaiaina, 7/30/1898, p. 4)

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Ka Loea Kalaiaina, Buke II, Helu 30, Aoao 4. Iulai 30, 1898.

Continuation of yesterday’s article on Waipio, Hawaii, 1877.

Upon that house foundation is where Hakau was killed by the men of Umi.

Pertaining to Pakaalana.—This is where was placed the sacred cord [aha kapu] of Liloa, that being Ahuula [Ahaula], and it was by this cord that the ancient alii were recognized by the cord falling, but if the person approaching before the cord was not an alii, it would not fall.

Stone Image [Kii Pohaku].—There is a tall rock standing at the corner of the enclosure, and within it is the stone image of Liloa, and it was beat by Kapiolani and she broke off the top of the stone, [?? a ua pakuiiae Kapiolani a haki iho o luna o ua pohaku la,] and beyond that lay the sacred platform of Liloa [ka paepae kapu o Liloa], which was made like stairs, Liloa’s was the second step above, where the sun rose, and the step below was his kahu’s; it was made like that so that the shadow of the kahu would not fall upon the alii.

Kahua Hale.—This is the foundation of the house that Liloa and the chiefs played konane, and this foundation is where Liloa found Umi playing konane, that is Kauleialoa.

Puuolea.—This is where the malihini chiefs went to rest, and if they wanted to have an audience with Liloa, they released a pig; if the pig went and lay before the kahuna of Liloa, then the alii would be called to go and see Liloa, but if the pig went and returned, then the alii was not allowed to go and see Liloa; it was understood that the alii was there to rob Liloa, and he was expelled immediately and if he loitered, he was put to death.

Papakonane.—Covered totally under sand is the konane board of Liloa, under coconut trees; if it was not buried in sand, the two of us would have dug it up with the kamaaina. Continue reading

A name song for Queen Kapiolani, 1893.

HE INOA NO NAPELAKAPU.

He inoa keia no Kapiolani
Napelakapu i ka Wekiu
He kuini hoi oe no Hawaii
Puuwai hamama no ka lahui
Imia ana hoi oe me ka noeau
I ka pono kau like a o Hawaii
Lohea kou leo e pae ana
Hooulu lahui ko’u makia
Hea mai ka leo Napelakapu
Me ka nawali hoi me ka nanahe
Nahenahe ko leo i pae mai
I kaui ana mai pehea wau
Pehea oukou e ka Lahui
Na ewe hanau o ka Aina
Eia Hawaii Moku o Keawe
Ke oi ku nei me ka ehaeha
Ua ike ku maka iho kakou
Na hana pakaha ke aloha ole
Ua hoonele ia kuu milimili
O Liliu o Loloku Lani ike kapu
Ua kaili ia ka Leialii
Kawalu o na Lani papahi ai
Pehea ka manao e ka Lahui
E Hawaii nui kualiholiho
Umia ke aloha paa i loko
Kaohi malie i ka puuwai
A a a he wa hiki mai ana
E lanakila ai Hawaii loa
E Lei hou ai i ka hanohano
I ka Lei Kalaunu ao Hawaii
Eia ke ola ua hiki mai
Kalamaku a o Hawaii
Ka Elele Lahui ua hoi mai
Me ka lono hauoli no ka Lahui
Kaana pono ia e ke kaulike
E Liliu o Loloku Lani i ke kapu
Makia paa ia o ka Lahui
Kawalu o na Lani i ke Kalaunu
Hea aku makou o mai oe
Napelakapu kou inoa
E ola o Kalani a mau loa
O Kapiolani i ka iu ao luna

Haku ia e

Mrs. Kala.

Honuakaha Mar. 21, 1893.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 3/22/1893, p. 3)

HE INOA NO NAPELAKAPU.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 667, Aoao 3. Maraki 22, 1893.