Kamehameha V’s Cabinet, 1872.

The True Ministers.—It pleased his Majesty on the 10th of September, to appoint those below as ministers of his nation:

Ferdinand W. Hutchison, Minister of Interior.
Stephen H. Phillips, Attorney General.
Robert Sterling, Minister of Finance.

The positions of Foreign Affairs and War are unfilled. But for now, their duties are given to His Ex. F. W. Hutchison to perform until the positions are filled.

(Kuokoa, 9/14/1872, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 14, 1872.

Kapiolani, the Heroine of Hawaii, 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Story of Kapiolani.—Anesona [Rufus Anderson] wrote this story, and it was published in English, and a copy of this story was acquired by us. Through this we can see Anesona’s aloha for us, taking up his time with this endeavor.

[Kapiolani, the Heroine of Hawaii; or, A Triumph of Grace at the Sandwich Islands. by Rufus Anderson, Charles Scribner & Co., New York, 1866.]

(Kuokoa, 7/7/1866, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 7, 1866.

Ke Alo Alii, 1866.

News of the Royal Court

The King is in good health; these days he resides at Hale Hoikea*, on the Royal Grounds of Iolani Hale. In the evening of Tuesday, He went to Helumoa, Waikiki, and returned that very evening to town. On Wednesday morning at 11:30, He boarded the American warship Lancaster docked at port. A twenty-one gun salute was given while the Sailors on the ship manned the yards,** and when he left, a 21-gun salute was given once more. The Alii who accompanied the King on this journey to see the warship were, Hon. Col. J. O. Dominis K. C. Governor of Oahu, Hon. C. C. Harris Minister of Finance, Hon. C. Kapaakea K. C., and Col. Prendergast messenger of His Highness Kekuanaoa.

Their Highnesses.

Her Highness V. K. Kamamalu is a bit sickly these days. His Highness M. Kekuanaoa K. G. C. is in good health.

The Queen Dowager.

The Dowager Queen is in good health, she goes carriage riding every morning.

*Hoikea, the residence of the Kings since Kamehameha III on the grounds of the Palace, is also seen as Hoihoikeea, and Hoihoikea.

**Paa o na i-a [o ka moku] i na luina. For more on manning the yards, see: https://www.maritimehawaii.com/2017/10/manning-the-yards/

(Au Okoa, 1/8/1866, p. 2)

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 38, Aoao 2. Ianuari 8, 1866.

Arrival of the Alii, 1844.

Honolulu, August 6, 1844.

Pertaining to the Arrival of the Chiefs.

We awaited the alii but they did not arrive, and on the 30th of July, canon fire was heard from Punchbowl [Puuawaina] announcing their arrival. A little thereafter we saw the approach of the three double-masted ships: Hooikaika, Paalua, and Victoria. And at midday, they all entered the harbor. When the alii were close by the American warship, the Warren, they boarded and canon were shot off in salute to the king; the salute was a fine thing. The King went ashore and the soldiers were waiting; cannons and drums were sounded, and he and his wife along with the alii and the officers went into his house at Maunakilika, and it is there that he resides these days.

Continue reading

Birthday of Kamehameha III.

[Found under: “NU HOU HAWAII.”]

The birthday of Kamehameha III was celebrated here in Honolulu on this past March 17 as a holiday in this manner: The doors of all the government offices were closed; there were shots at 12 o’clock at the battery of Kakaako; and there was a shooting competition by the King’s Own, the Prince’s Own, and the Mamalahoa Guards at Auwaiolimu.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 3/20/1886, p. 2)

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke IX, Helu 12, Aoao 2. Maraki 20, 1886.

Haleakala Hale, residence of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop, 1866.

Pertaining to Haleakala Hale—The roof of the house Haleakala at Aigupita, the town home of one of our young chiefs, B. Pauahi Bishop, is being redone. The wooden shingles have been pried off and slate shingles are being laid. This house was built by the late A. Paki, with the thought that a second story would be built like the Palace, but this was not fulfilled until this era.

(Au Okoa, 10/1/1866, p. 2)

Ke Au Okoa, Buke II, Helu 24, Aoao 2. Okatoba 1, 1866.

Death of Pilipo Naone, John K. Naone’s father, 1882.

PILIPO NAONE.

On the 16th of February past, Naone let out his last breath, and the man returned to his Lord whom he loved greatly, for whom he was a servant in many good works; Naone died at eighty or so years old. He was born up in Pauoa. His father was Mahi and his  mother was Hama [?? it is hard to read]; his parents were from Kauai and then resided in Pauoa; these parents had three children: Pokaakua, along with P. Naone and D. Lima; Pokaakua and Lima died ealier, and only Naone lived until old age, living for more than 80 years. Continue reading

Six years later, Mary’s husband John K. Naone dies, 1906.

J. K. NAONE HAS PASSED ON.

On the 8th of this month, like a their in the night, the hand of death which has no compassion visited the home of John K. Naone, at Pauoa, Honolulu nei, and snatched away the spirit of the bodily abode of John K. Naone, at 64 years old 11 months and 7 days of life, and left behind dust to dust.

John K. Naone was the last child of Pastor Naone [Pilipo Naone] and Pele, his first wife. Hao was the first child, Hama, Daniela, and Meli, were the elder siblings of the one who passed on. He was born on the 31st of January 1841, at Pauoa, and he was educated at the Royal School of Kahehuna. He was married to Mele Ahia [Mary Ahia], but they had not children.

He was the head of the prison for some years, and a tax collector for the Ewa District for some years.

During the time of the Kamehamehas, he joined the guards, and he was a lieutenant in the Princeʻs Own Guards [ka pualikoa Prince Own], and he was a rifleman for that company.

He was a member of the Kawaiahao Church, and was in the choir for a number of years. He was a very skilled painter, and it is in that profession which he kept at until he grew weak and put it aside. Continue reading

Mrs. Elizabeth Kahele Nahaolelua to return home, 1897.

RETURNING.

Aboard the Australia of this past Tuesday, there was a letter received by the family and friends of Mrs. Kahele Nahaolelua, Queen Liliuokalani’s lady-in-waiting [mea lawelawe], on Her [the Queen’s] voyage to seek what is right for Her people, who is staying in Washington; saying that she [Nahaolelua] is returning because of her illness, Continue reading

Kamehameha II and Kamamalu return aboard the British ship Blonde on May 4, 1825.

Remembrances.

On the 22nd of May in the year 1824, King Liholiho and his attendants landed in Portsmouth, England. On the 26th [of May] of that same year, Kaumualii, the King of Kauai, died at Honolulu, and Lahaina is where he was buried. Continue reading