Day after La Kuokoa, 1879.

Yesterday, the 28th of November, was a national holiday of Hawaii nei, and it was the Thirty-Sixth year as a nation because of the agreement of the great nations of Great Britain and France. It is a day that is cherished by every Hawaiian heart. Continue reading

The time will come, 1893.

Tomorrow, November 28, is the Independence Day of Hawaii nei, and it will be the fiftieth year of our living as an Independent Nation, and being recognized by the enlightened nations of the world. This is the jubilee year; however, the plunderers believe that they hold the steering paddle and that we will not have a joyful jubilee on that day. What of that; let us be patient, for there will come a day that the lahui will be joyful and be pleased to no end. Hold your breaths! It will come!

(Lei Momi, 11/27/1893, p. 4)

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Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 17, Aoao 4. Novemaba 27, 1893.

La Kuokoa celebrated at Kawaiahao Church, 1892.

AN OPEN INVITATION.

To all citizens who have aloha for their Alii and patriots of Queen Liliuokalani, in the district of Honolulu;

Aloha to you all: Those whose names appear below are members of the Committee to invite all citizens for the YMCA [Ahahui Opiopio Imipono Karistiano] of Kawaiahao and Kaumakapili. Continue reading

Another mele for La Kuokoa, 1871.

No ka La Kuokoa.

Leo.—A Victory, Happy Hours. p 144.

1. Ke kani nei na pahu e,
Ma keia la maikai;
E ala mai a oli ae,
La Kuokoa nei.
Ke kani nei na mele e
Mauka, a makai;
Maanei, ma o, a ma na puu,
Nani ke kani mai.

Cho—Hooho pu na kini nei,
Huza, huza, e oli e,
Huza, huza, huza, e oli e,
Huza, huza, huza, e oli e. Continue reading

A song for Hawaiian Independence Day, 1870.

La Kuokoa o Hawaii.

1. E ku kakou a olioli pu,
No ka la Kuokoa o Hawaii nei,
Ua hiki no ia kakou,
Ke haanui a haakena,
I ka pomaikai o ka lahui,
No ka la Kuokoa o ke aupuni.

He la kupanaha no  keia,
I ike ole ia mamua,
Ia Kauikeaouli me Liholiho,
Me na la mua o Kamehameha.

2. Ke ku mai nei Hawaii,
Ua hauoli na kuahiwi,
Ua haanou o Maunakea,
Ua hipahipa o Maunaloa,
Hu-lo-hu-lo o Hualalai,
No ka la Kuokoa o ke aupuni.

He la kupanaha no keia, &c., Continue reading

Remarks on the state of the United States.

Some newspapers are trouncing the Captain and Clerk of the steamboat Globe for refusing a seat at their breakfast table to Haalilio, Embassador from the King of the Hawaiian or Sandwich Islands to this Government—the said Envoy laboring under the original sin of being copper-colored. Of course, the steamboat men were wrong—but was it indeed their fault, or that of a diseased public opinion—a ridiculous and disgraceful popular prejudice? Suppose this Haalilio had been a mulatto native of the United States—a free voter and ‘sovereign’ of this Country—the son, for instance, of our late Vice President—these same papers would probably have abused the Captain if he had given him a seat at the common table, and even stigmatized the passengers for consenting to eat with him! And why is not a cleanly and well-bred American freeman as good as a Sandwich Island dignitary?—There is no Country on earth where Social Aristocracy is more exclusive and absurd than here, and the less manhood a person has the more he plumes himself on his external and factitious advantages over some one whom he tries hard to look down upon.

[It sounds like things really have not changed so much.]

(New York Daily Tribune, 1/28/1843, p. 2)

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The New York Daily Tribune, Volume II, Number 250, Page 2. January 28, 1843.

 

Queen Liliuokalani at La Kuokoa celebration, 1896.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

J. K. Kaulia, president-elect of the Hui Aloha Aina, entertained the delegates and other friends at his residence on Saturday. The Hawaiian flag was in evidence, and also hoisted on the new flag staff for the first time in recognition  of Independence. Queen Liliuokalani was present.

(Independent, 11/30/1896, p. 3)

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The Independent, Volume III, Number 444, Page 3. November 30, 1896.

New Hawaiian shop, “Ka Noeau o Hawaii,” 1896.

“Ka Noeau o Hawaii.”

This is the name of a store that opened on this Independence Day [La Kuokoa] by some Hawaiian women in an office of Charles Aki’s [Kale Aki] large new rental space just built at Leleo near Koiuiu. There is sold Hawaiian goods fashioned with skill by the hands of women like ie hats, fans, blankets, purses, lace, and many other things, and also they do tailoring. This shop is under the equal management of Mrs. Aana Kekoa and her sister L. Aoe Like and Meleana Li. We doubt it, but it is said that they did sacrifices with the snout of a pig, and they feasted with those that labored with them until satiated. Our prayer for them is that they meet with good fortune and progress.

(Makaainana, 12/7/1896, p. 2)

"Ka Noeau o Hawaii."

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI—-Ano Hou, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 7, 1896.