“An Adornment for the Patriots,” 1893.

HE OHU NO KA POE ALOHA AINA.

Kaulana na pua o Hawaii
Kupaa mahope o ka aina
Hiki mai ka elele o ka lokoino
Palapala alunu me ka pakaha
Pane mai o Hawaii Nui a Keawe
Kokua na Honoapiilani
Kakoo mai Kauai o Mano
Pau pu me ke one o Kakuhihewa
Aole e kau e ka pulima
Maluna o ka pepa a ka enemi
Aole makou e minamina
I ka puu dala a ke aupuni
Hoohui aina kuai hewa
I pono kivila o ke kanaka
Mahope makou o ka Moi
A kau hou ia i ke Kalaunu
Haina ia mai ana ka puana
No ka poe i aloha i ka aina.

Miss Kekoaohiwaikalani,

Puahaulani Hale.

Honolulu, Feb. 10, 1893.

[This is perhaps the very first publication of Ellen Kekoaohiwaikalani Prendergast’s “Kaulana na Pua:” “An Adornment for the Patriots.” Was the idea about eating stones not in the original composition and added on after the Hawaiian National Band [Bana Lahui] was told by Herny Berger that they would have to sign their names to the annexation club roll lest they end up having to eat stones? The first time it seems that the lines about eating stones was published was under the title “He Inoa no na Keiki o ka Bana Lahui” [A Name Song for the Boys of the Hawaiian National Band]  in 3/23/1893 on the second page of Hawaii Holomua.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 2/24/1893, p. 3)

LOKL_2_24_1893_3.png

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 649, Aoao 3. Feberuari 24, 1893.

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Hawaiian Band and the parade for the Knights Templar, 1883.

THE SIR KNIGHTS IN CALIFORNIA.

A Splendid Reception.

San Francisco, 18.—The arrival of the St. Bernard commandery, of Chicago was the event of the day. A delegation from the San Francisco Commandery proceeded as far as Truckee, to welcome them to the Pacific coast. The special honors tendered them are in recognition of the welcome the latter gave to the Pacific coast Knights at the Chicago conclave. On their arrival this morning they were met at the ferry landing by the Knights of the city commanderies, accompanied by Knights from Illinois now here; all in full dress uniform, after the exchange of greetings the knights fell into line, led by the Hawaiian band, and followed by the California commandery mounted. The Presidio band, Golden Gate commandery, St. Bernard band and St. Bernard commandery bringing up the rear. In this order they reached the Baldwin Hotel selected as the headquarters of the Chicago commandery. As an evidence of the marked attention paid them, one detail may be mentioned. Each cigar purchased for their use was provided with a band on which was painted, in colors, the name of their commandery while each box, specially made, was emblazoned with the device, St. Bernard. Mrs. Moulton, wife of the commander, was presented with a flower piece, three fee long and two in breadth, representing every variety of the choicest flowers of California. Including knights from Oregon and Washington Territory, it is estimated that 3,000 persons arrived in this city within the last twenty-four hours.

(Salt Lake Daily Herald, 8/19/1883, p. 1)

SaltLakeHerald_8_19_1883_1

Salt Lake Daily Herald, Volume XIV, Number 64, Page 1. August 19, 1883.

50th Anniversary of the Bana Hawaii, 1919

Pictures 1—The Hawaiian Band taken in San Francisco in 1883. 2—The band on the steps of the new Palace and the Executive Building [Hale Mana Hooko] today, taken in 1884. The new uniforms of the boys seen in this picture was sent by mistake from America to Honduras, Central America. 3—The Band lead by [Jose S.] Libornio that refused to swear under the Provisional Government in 1893. 4—The picture of J. K. Pohina [James K. Pohina], the only man left of the 26 who established the band 50 years ago, who is still with the Hawaiian Band. 5—The band at the Golden Gate, of San Francisco, at a banquet in 1895. 6—The band today at their new home on Waiakamilo Street, Kalihi. 7—The Bana Hawaii leading the parade of the Great Secret Society Knights Templars in San Francisco, August 20, 1883.

50 YEARS SINCE THE FORMATION OF THE BANA HAWAII

When Kamehameha V was ruling fifty years ago, the Hawaiian Band was established by a British man named Mr. Northcett, under orders of the King. On that day 26 young men were chosen for the band from the reformatory school of Keoneula, and the teaching of this knowledge to them was immediately began. The king had this idea first and so brass instruments were ordered earlier and they arrived here in Honolulu before he chose Mr. Northcett as the instructor to teach the boys. Continue reading

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

William S. Ellis, leader of the glee club accompanying the Royal Hawaiian Band on tour, 1906.

THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND AND THE HAWAIIAN GLEE CLUB.

WILLIAM S. ELLIS, THE LEADER OF THE SINGERS THAT ARE TRAVELLING WITH THE ROYAL HAWAIIAN BAND.

In the month of June, the Royal Hawaiian Band is leaving Honolulu and going on their tour of the states of the United States of America, and their number will increase until it includes forty people. Other than that, the band will go with a Hawaiian glee club that is made up of twenty people.

William S. Ellis formed the glee club going along with the band, and currently there are fifteen skilled singers who are practicing. When the band arrives in San Francisco, this glee club will be increased by the club that is touring America under the leadership of John S. Ellis.

(Kuokoa, 3/9/1906, p. 1)

KA BANA HAWAII A ME KA HUI HIMENI HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 9, 1906.

Nane Alapai, 1906.

THE HAPPY-VOICED KAHULI OF THE HAWAIIAN BAND

When the Royal Hawaiian Band and the Hawaiian Glee Club leaves for America in the next month of June, Mrs. Nane Alapai [Nani Alapai], the Beautiful-Voiced Kahuli of the Hawaiian Band will accompany them, should there be no obstructions in her way.

When the band first went with her along, the haole of Portland, where they travelled to, were driven crazy, and that is the reason that there was unequaled exclaim for the beauty of of the singing along with the skill of the band; and their travelling there caused a great interest in Hawaii, which is why there is a great influx in the number of haole coming to the Hawaiian Islands.

Mrs. Nane Alapai [Nani Alapai], was born in Lihue, on the island of Kauai, from the loins of her parents, on the 1st of December, 1874; her parents are Mr. Malina and Keokilele is her mother. And after going around Kauai during her youth, she was taken…

(Kuokoa, 3/16/1906, p. 1)

KE KAHULI LEOLE'A O KA BANA HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 11, Aoao 1. Maraki 16, 1906.

to Honolulu, where she was educated at the Catholic Boarding School for Girls. She married her husband, Mr. W. J. Alapai almost eleven years ago. She has some siblings other than her; five brothers and eight sisters.

When she joined the Royal Hawaiian Band until today, she spent nine years singing before an audience, and during that whole time, her singing has brought much delight in Hawaii’s people and more so in the malihini who come to Hawaii and then go to America; they are so much more delighted; and this is very valuable to Hawaii and to her herself, and this advertises Hawaii’s beauty; the beauty of her ridges, the beauty of her mountains, and the beauty of the songs of her people; it seems there will be a lot of Hawaiian singer born as a result.

(Kuokoa, 3/16/1906, p. 5)

KE KAHULI LEOLE'A O KA BANA HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 11, Aoao 5. Maraki 16, 1906.

Royal Hawaiian Band on major tour, 1906.

THE HAWAIIAN BAND HAS LEFT

Miss Annie Leilehua Brown is the Kahuli¹ that has Left.

Madame Nane [Nani] Alapai Pulled Out Over Some Issues—The Places They Will Visit.

MISS ANNIE LEILEHUA BROWN, THE KAHULI OF THE HAWAIIAN BAND WHO HAS LEFT.

On the evening of this past Wednesday, the Royal Hawaiian Band gave their aloha to the communities of their beloved land, and travelled across the wide ocean to the Golden Gate [Ipuka Gula] of San Francisco, and from there they will travel the major cities of the Father Land. They made the deck of the Steamer Korea adorned with them.

There were sixty people on there of the band and glee club, and the majority are Hawaiian, with a few Portuguese; and some people are waiting in San Francisco to join up with the band there. All of them are under the management of Mr. J. C. Cohen, the haole who took the band earlier to Portland [Pokolana].

There is one sad thing, and that is the dropping of the sweet-voiced singer of the band, Madame Nane [Nani] Alapai. Due to a differences between her and J. C. Cohen about her husband, Mrs. Alapai has left the band, and returned to the bosom of her beloved husband; this is a noble example of the power of aloha that is triply bound betwixt a man and his wife; and she will abandon the prestige and power of money.

Hawaii however does not lack in all sorts of singers, so that band is not missing a singer being that they were accompanied by Miss Annie Leilehua Brown, the bird that enlivens the nights of Niolopa. Upon this Hawaiian girl lies the hopes of J. C. Cohen that Hawaii will be lauded with much praise, and that before the band returns home, this girl will become something big.

There are men in that band with beautiful voices, and they will be made to sing solos. There is Jack Ellis, one of Hawaii’s fine tenors; Beni Jones, the bull of the Kawaihau Glee Club; William Ellis and Solomon Hiram, the baritones. When they are all singing together, it is just so beautiful!

These below are all of the people in this tour of the band:

Executive Staff—J. C. Cohen, general manager [lunanui]; A. A. Lotto, business representative [lunahana]; W. Prestidge, master of properties [malama waiwai]; W. Schwartz, assistant master of properties [hope malama waiwai] and librarian [malama pepa].

THE BAND.

Captain H. Berger, Director.

Clarinets—D. K. Naone, C. Palikapu, F. Santanna, L. Salamanco, P. K. Kakalia, S. Opeka, J. M. Gomes, A. H. Elona, P. Kanoho, A. Baker, G. K. Gilman, D. Nape, S. Santanna.

Saxophones—W. S. Ellis, L. Nunes.

Oboes—K. Peters, D. Kaiwi.

Drums—J. Naone, J. C. Freitas, J. Colburn.

The Brass Section.

Cornets—J. Amasiu, Charles Krueter, L. Waiamau, R. W. Aylett, W. Anahu, M. Moniz, W. Sea.

Baritone Horn—M. Mendoza.

Tubas—R. H. Baker, J. Kanoho, J. Kaaua, J. McCabe.

Alto Horns—M. Garcia, R. S. Kapua, G. Wela, H. Keawe.

Trombones—H. Heanu, J. Punua, J. Pa, S. Hiram.

GLEE CLUB.

Directors—Sonny Cunha and W. S. Ellis.

Double bass—R. H. Baker; Violinists—J. Colburn, C. Palikapu; flutists, D. Kaiwi, D. Nape; Piano, Sonny Cunha.

Singers—John S. Ellis, tenor, soloist; Ben Jones, bass, soloist; W. S. Ellis, baritone, soloist; Solomon Hiram, J. Harrison, P. H. Kakalia, W. Sea, H. Heanu, H. K. Clark, K. Peters, J. Kamakani, L. Waiamau, J. Edwards, R. W. Aylett, Joe Pa, J. Akana, H. Keawe, J. K. Kaaa, R. S. Kapua, J. Punua.

Female singer—Miss Lei Lehua [Leilehua]

THE PLACES THEY WILL TRAVEL.

May 28 to June 4, 1906, Oakland, California.
June 5, Stockton, Yosemite Theater.
June 6, Sacramento, Clumie Theater.
June 7, on the road.
June 8, 9, Portland, Oregon, Hellig Theater.
June 10, 11, 12, Seattle, Washington, Grand Music House.
June 13, Victoria, British Columbia, Victoria Theater.
June 14, Vancouver, B. C., Vancouver Music House.
June 15, Watcom, Washington, Beck Theater.
June 16, Everett, Washington, Everett Theater.
June 17, Tacoma, Washington, Music House.
June 18, Aberdeen, Washington, Music House.
June 19, Yakima, Washington, Yakima Theater.
June 20, 21, Spokane, Washington, Spokane Theater.
June 22, Missoula, Montana, Music House.
June 23, Helena, Montana, Helena Theater.
June 24, Great Falls, Montana, Music House.

¹Kahuli are the famous singing land shells which are often used to describe sweet-voiced singers.

(Kuokoa, 5/25/1906, p. 1)

UA HOLO AKU LA KA BANA HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 21, Aoao 1. Mei 25, 1906.

June 25, Anaconda, Montana, Margaret Theater.
June 26, Butte, Montana, Broadway Theater.
June 28, Pocatello, Idaho, Auditorium.
June 29, Logan, Utah, Thatcher Music House.
June 30, July 1, Ogden, Utah, Music House.
July 2, 3, 4, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Theater.
July 5, Salida, Colorado, Music House.
July 6, Pueblo, Colorado, Music House.
July 7, Colorado Springs, Music House.
July 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, Denver, Colorado, Tabor Grand Theater.

(Kuokoa, 5/25/1906, p. 8)

HOLO AKU KA BANA HAWAII.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIV, Helu 21, Aoao 8. Mei 25, 1906.