Na Keiki Ai Pohaku, 1895.

THE HAWAIIAN NATIONAL BAND

There was much enjoyment given by the Hawaiian Band on this past Friday night. It seemed like there were three thousand people who went to listen to them play. There was great appreciation for the new tune, “Ka Maki i Daimana Hila” [The March to Diamond Head],* Continue reading

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Death of Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, 1918.

MY HINANO LEI HAS GONE

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Aloha between the two of us strangers:—May it please your honor to welcome my bundle of hinano lei in a open space of your office and it will be you who carries it to the four corners of this globe, so that the family, friends, and the many people of my dear hinano lei, my husband, will know that he has passed on and that he left me and our beloved lei grieving for him in this world.

On Thursday, July 11, 1918, at 4 p. m., my dear Joseph K. Kaaa grew weary of this life and and silently moved on alone to the other side of the dark river of death, leaving me behind, burdened with our beloved lei. Auwe, how pained is my heart! No more is my dear Joseph Kaaua Kaaa, my companion for all places.

O Kukalahale Rain, you will no longer see his eyes, no more will will hear his voice, and he will not tread upon your streets.

Auwe, my sadness and grief for my dear husban who has gone afar; no more will I see his features; no more will I hear his voice; no more, no more for all times!

Continue reading

“What always carries the crowd away,” 1893 / today / forevermore.

WHAT THEY SING.

What Always Carries the Crowd Away.

The patriotic song, “Kaulana na Pua o Hawaii,” composed and sung by the Hawaiian National Band at their concerts, has been put into English by “Makee Aupuni”:

Standing by our native land
Are we sons of Hawaii nei,
Daring a false and treacherous band,
Whose minions come from o’er the sea.

Responds our hearts from isle to isle,
Resolved to die before we yield,
Our ancient birthright ne’er defile,
We’ll spill our blood on freedom’s shield.

Responds Hawaii of Keawe
To farthest sands of green Mano,
Piilani’s land, and Kakuhihewa’s sand,
Shall witness that we face the foe. Continue reading

“An Adornment for the Patriots,” 1893.

HE OHU NO KA POE ALOHA AINA.

Kaulana na pua o Hawaii
Kupaa mahope o ka aina
Hiki mai ka elele o ka lokoino
Palapala alunu me ka pakaha
Pane mai o Hawaii Nui a Keawe
Kokua na Honoapiilani
Kakoo mai Kauai o Mano
Pau pu me ke one o Kakuhihewa
Aole e kau e ka pulima
Maluna o ka pepa a ka enemi
Aole makou e minamina
I ka puu dala a ke aupuni
Hoohui aina kuai hewa
I pono kivila o ke kanaka
Mahope makou o ka Moi
A kau hou ia i ke Kalaunu
Haina ia mai ana ka puana
No ka poe i aloha i ka aina.

Miss Kekoaohiwaikalani,

Puahaulani Hale.

Honolulu, Feb. 10, 1893.

[This is perhaps the very first publication of Ellen Kekoaohiwaikalani Prendergast’s “Kaulana na Pua:” “An Adornment for the Patriots.” Was the idea about eating stones not in the original composition and added on after the Hawaiian National Band [Bana Lahui] was told by Herny Berger that they would have to sign their names to the annexation club roll lest they end up having to eat stones? The first time it seems that the lines about eating stones was published was under the title “He Inoa no na Keiki o ka Bana Lahui” [A Name Song for the Boys of the Hawaiian National Band]  in 3/23/1893 on the second page of Hawaii Holomua.]

(Leo o ka Lahui, 2/24/1893, p. 3)

LOKL_2_24_1893_3.png

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 649, Aoao 3. Feberuari 24, 1893.

Restoration Day celebration by true patriots, 1894.

LA HOIHOI EA.

Fitting Remembrances for that Great Day.

This past Tuesday, July 31, was the day that the independence and the beloved flag of this land was restored after being seized and forcefully taken by Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki Pauleti] on February 25, 1843, without orders from his Nation, and Rear-Admiral Thomas [Hope-Adimerala Kamaki] was the one who restored it on this day in that very year, five months and some days after it was stolen. This day is celebrated by all true patriots with many feasts all over the place.

In the early morning, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Puali Puhiohe Lahui] went to entertain the Alii, the Monarch, at Washington Place. When they entered the yard after marching from Emma Square [Ema Kuea], the door was swung open and they marched to the Ewa corner of the house and began to play. The Alii came out and sat on the lanai on that side. The songs that were played were full of reverence, awe, and joy. Outside before the front yard were the masses, and children climbed the fence and went inside. From what we saw, the crowd was looking intensely to try and maybe get a glimpse of the Alii, showing that the songs by the band wasn’t what they desired, but it was the sight of the face and the appearance of the Ruler that they were after, as it is sung: “Our desire is but for our Alii, The one we care for.” [“O ke Alii wale no ka makou makemake, O ka luhi o maua me ia nei.”]

After the music was over, the Alii stood and spoke briefly before these people who stood steadfast behind her, with words of encouragement. She stressed that the lahui keep the peace, like her statement of January 14, 1893, for the welfare of her people, and that it would be but a few more days before, according to assurances she received, that she will once again have them [? e kikoo hou mai ai oia ia lakou] go back to their lives just as before. The Alii had as well some words filled with aloha, and there was not one from amongst the members of the band who did not shed tears; some shed great many tears while blowing their noses into handkerchiefs.

That night, on the grounds of the Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], they gave an open concert to entertain the public, and just as was seen at the performance they put on earlier, so too was this one, and it was very well attended. Those who attended were very happy, there being perhaps 3000, from men to women, from the old to they young, and from those of high stature to low. They played without electric lights, but were illuminated by Japanese lanterns and their pewter lanterns. It would appear as if they were totally thwarted by the Government [P. G.], but in fact it was the deceitful ones who were disappointed, because they were all the more delighted. There was a single wealth-seeking haole [kolea kauahua] that we saw sitting on the lanai of the Hotel, on the Waikiki side, with his mouth wide open, maybe because he witnessed the unmatched beauty of that great night of entertainment, that person was the one with a maimed hand from Boston.

[Let the story never be forgotten. Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono!]

(Makaainana, 8/6/1894, p. 1)

LA HOIHOI EA.

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Augate 6, 1894.

The passing of Jack Kuamoo, 1913.

JACK KUAMOO HAS PASSED AWAY.

He is one of the members of the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] established by Professor Northcock, a British man, and under his instruction, Jack Kuamoo acquired a superior talent in playing the smaller drums. There is no one amongst the Hawaiian people and amongst those who play the smaller drums of our band these days that can follow after the talent that Jack Kuamoo had.

In 1895, the Royal Hawaiian Band went to America under the leadership of Professor Libornio, a Filipino, and his abilities in drumming smaller drums diminished in the places where we in the band played. He was a known expert in his talent taught to him until proficient, and it is the old kamaaina of Honolulu nei who are the witness to this.

With his death, he left behind three of his old friends still living: Frank Mahuka, living with his children, grandchildren and many of his family in Kalihi Camp; James Pohina, and the one writing this [Samuel K. Kamakea], still with the band today. All of the old ones of this profession in 1870 have died, and we are the old members left alive today. But we are to follow too on the same path, so who amongst us three will be the one to go after Jack Kuamoo.

Because of the unforgettable remembrances of Captain H. Berger for Jack Kuamoo, he was invited by the members of the Band to offer some dirges at the crypt of Manuel Silva, and the loving invitation by the band was accepted, and at half past three in the afternoon of this Wednesday, the band played some mele kanikau for Jack Kuamoo.

We, the old members of the band, are giving our right hand of true aloha, and join with you O Wife who is left without a husband, and grieve with you, and mourn with you, and carry with you the sadness borne upon you; and may the Heavens wash away all of the streaks of tears from you.

We with sincerity,

FRANK MAHUKA,

JAMES POHINA,

SAMUEL K. KAMAKEA.

[Does anyone know who the Professor Northcock mentioned refers to?]

(Kuokoa, 9/26/1913, p. 3)

O JACK KUAMOO UA HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 38, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 26, 1913.