Royal Hawaiian Band and “Kaulana na Pua,” 1893.

NIGHT OF GREAT ENTERTAINMENT.¹

There were many people who arrived at the Night of Entertainment by the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Lahui Hawaii], at the Hawaiian Hotel on the evening of this past Tuesday. There were perhaps 5,000 people of all ethnicities who showed up to listen to those beautiful singers of Hawaii. Because of your fine work, O Patriots, therefore the lahui showed its appreciation to you all, with them always filling the audiences of all the performances you give. The singing voices were sweet, and the most acclaimed was your “Mele Ai Pohaku.” The audience went home with happy hearts because of the mele that were played, along with the singing. When will the next performance be? Send in a notice in advance, and we will inform the multitudes and the friends of the occasion.

¹”Ka Po Lea o Halalii.”

(Leo o ka Lahui, 10/12/1893, p. 2)

KA PO LEA O HALALII.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 789, Aoao 3. Okatoba 12, 1893.

Restoration Day celebration by true patriots, 1894.

LA HOIHOI EA.

Fitting Remembrances for that Great Day.

This past Tuesday, July 31, was the day that the independence and the beloved flag of this land was restored after being seized and forcefully taken by Lord George Paulet [Lo Keoki Pauleti] on February 25, 1843, without orders from his Nation, and Rear-Admiral Thomas [Hope-Adimerala Kamaki] was the one who restored it on this day in that very year, five months and some days after it was stolen. This day is celebrated by all true patriots with many feasts all over the place.

In the early morning, the Royal Hawaiian Band [Puali Puhiohe Lahui] went to entertain the Alii, the Monarch, at Washington Place. When they entered the yard after marching from Emma Square [Ema Kuea], the door was swung open and they marched to the Ewa corner of the house and began to play. The Alii came out and sat on the lanai on that side. The songs that were played were full of reverence, awe, and joy. Outside before the front yard were the masses, and children climbed the fence and went inside. From what we saw, the crowd was looking intensely to try and maybe get a glimpse of the Alii, showing that the songs by the band wasn’t what they desired, but it was the sight of the face and the appearance of the Ruler that they were after, as it is sung: “Our desire is but for our Alii, The one we care for.” [“O ke Alii wale no ka makou makemake, O ka luhi o maua me ia nei.”]

After the music was over, the Alii stood and spoke briefly before these people who stood steadfast behind her, with words of encouragement. She stressed that the lahui keep the peace, like her statement of January 14, 1893, for the welfare of her people, and that it would be but a few more days before, according to assurances she received, that she will once again have them [? e kikoo hou mai ai oia ia lakou] go back to their lives just as before. The Alii had as well some words filled with aloha, and there was not one from amongst the members of the band who did not shed tears; some shed great many tears while blowing their noses into handkerchiefs.

That night, on the grounds of the Hawaiian Hotel [Hotele Hawaii], they gave an open concert to entertain the public, and just as was seen at the performance they put on earlier, so too was this one, and it was very well attended. Those who attended were very happy, there being perhaps 3000, from men to women, from the old to they young, and from those of high stature to low. They played without electric lights, but were illuminated by Japanese lanterns and their pewter lanterns. It would appear as if they were totally thwarted by the Government [P. G.], but in fact it was the deceitful ones who were disappointed, because they were all the more delighted. There was a single wealth-seeking haole [kolea kauahua] that we saw sitting on the lanai of the Hotel, on the Waikiki side, with his mouth wide open, maybe because he witnessed the unmatched beauty of that great night of entertainment, that person was the one with a maimed hand from Boston.

[Let the story never be forgotten. Ua mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono!]

(Makaainana, 8/6/1894, p. 1)

LA HOIHOI EA.

Ka Makaainana, Buke II—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Augate 6, 1894.

Napua Stevens back home, 1938.

CAME BACK HOME

The picture above is a picture of that kamaaina girl of Hilo nei, Miss Harriet Napua Stevens, formerly of Hilo and who is now staying in Honolulu and heard nightly at the Young Hotel [Hokele Iana] singing with the Band of Giggi Royce [Gigi Royce] of Honolulu. Continue reading

First graduating class of Kamehameha School for Girls, 1897.

PERFORMANCE OF KAMEHAMEHA GIRLS SCHOOL.

The Graduates.

On the evening of this past Tuesday, June 29, a performance of speeches and singing was held at Kaumakapili Church by the students of the Kamehameha School for girls, and this was an assembly for the graduation of some students of this school this year with them receiving diplomas.

It is said that there were almost 2000 onlookers who crowded into the walls of Kaumakapili Church, with still more excited people outside, from the Government road until the steps and covering up the entrance.

Right before the Organ was made a stage, and above it were placed pots of greenery of all sorts. And upon this sad the students for whom was that beautiful night [“ka po nani o Halalii”¹].

These are the young ladies of the school who graduated this year: Lydia Aholo, Julia Akana, Kalei Ewaliko, Miriama Hale, Lewa Iokia, Helen Kahaleahu, Elizabeth Kahanu, Malie Kapali, Hattie Kekalohe, Elizabeth Kaliinoi, Keluia Kiwaha, Julia Lovell, Jessie Mahoahoa, Elizabeth Waiamau, and Aoe Wong Kong.

This is the program of events: Chorus: In Heavenly Love Abiding”—”Noho ma ke Aloha Lani” (Mendelssohn). Kamehameha Girls’ School.

Prayer: Rev. C. M. Hyde, D. D.

Topic: “The Teacher and Trainer of Hawaii’s Little Ones”—Ke Kumuao a Alakai o ko Hawaii Poe Pokii: Lewa Iokia.

Mele (Poem): “The Greatest Discovery—Ke Pookela o na Mea i Huliia: Hattie Kekalohe.

Topic: “My Life at Kamehameha”—Ko’u mau La ma Kamehameha: Aoe Wong Kong.

Topic: “The Servant of the Soul”—Ke Kauwa a ka Uhane: Elizabeth Kahanu.

Topic: “Wake the Divine Within”—Hoala ae i ko loko Uhane Pono: Elizabeth Waiamau.

Topic: “A Bit of Clay”—He Huna Lepo Palolo: Kalei Ewaliko.

Chorus: “Sweet May” (Barnby): Class.

Topic: “A Plea for the Children”—He leo i na Keiki: Malie Kapali.

Topic: “Domestic Sciences”—Na Ike Nohona Home: Jessie Mahoahoa.

Topic: “The Use of Music”—Ka Waiwai o ka Ike Mele: Lydia Aholo.

Topic: “A Practical Art”—Ka Ike Hana maoli: Julia Lovell.

Mele (Music): “At School Close” (Whittier): Elizabeth Keliinoi.

Diplomas Given.

Chorus: “Cradle Song:” Kamehameha School for Girls.

Benediction [Pule Hoomaikai] by Rev. E. S. Timoteo.

¹”Ka po nani o Halalii” [Beautiful night of Halalii] seems to be a variation of the idiom “Ka po le’a o Halalii” [Enjoyable night of Halalii].

[I just ran across this article while looking for something else today, and thought it would be a nice follow up to the earlier articles on the opening of Kamehameha Girls School.]

(Kuokoa, 7/2/1897, p. 2)

KA HOIKE O KE KULA KAIKAMAHINE O KAMEHAMEHA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVI, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 2, 1897.