Tom Hiona opens halau, 1947.

TOM HIONA

WELL KNOWN TEACHER Of Hula to Open Studio on March 1

One of Hawaii’s best known teachers of the hula and directors of hula dancing, Tom Hiona, will open a new studio March 1. the studio is located at 1914 Kahai St., Kalihi.

For the past 15 years, Tom Hiona has been a leader in teaching both ancient and modern hula dances. He will instruct classes in all types of hula, including the following—pahu or drum dances, the olapa, uliuli or rattle gourd, puili or bamboo, iliili or pebble, ka kalaau or tapping sticks as well as modern dances. Continue reading

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Early days of some of the greats, 1933.

PTA news
FOR ISLAND PARENTS & TEACHERS

CUMMINS SCHOOL

C. C. Robinson of the Y. M. C. A. spoke on “Developing Comradship Between Parents and Children” at the Liholiho P. T. A. meeting at Cummins school last Thursday evening. F. Nobriga, principal, introduced the speaker.

It was announced that there will be a sale of laulaus at the school on February 4, with Mrs. Kaulia in charge.

There will be a Valentine Party on February 14, for the faculty and P. T. A. officers.

Each month a different group has charge of the entertainment. At this meeting Mrs. Kaulia presented the following Hawaiian program which included hula, “Beauty” by Iolani Luahine; solo, Leimomi Kaulia; trio, Lydia Kaloio and companions; chant, Keahi Luahine; hula olapa, Helen Smythe; duet, Leimomi Kaulia and Mabel Kaulia; songs, “Akaka” by Emma Paishon and Iolani Luahine; hula, Lydia Kaloio and Julia Doyle, and hula, Lydia Kaloio. Continue reading

Graduation at Honokaa, 1941.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU HAMAKUA AME KOHALA”]

Honokaa: Last week in the evening of Tuesday, in the hall of Honokaa High School, the graduation ceremony was held for the children who numbered 46, from the 12th grade of the High School of Honokaa. The girls wore white, and the boys wore white pants, black coats, and blue shirts; large bouquets of gardenias were in their hair of the girls, and for the boys, in the collar of their coats. The parents and friends of these children were welcomed by the ushers with paper programs showing the schedule of events of that evening.

At half past seven, the instruments of the Glee Club of the School sounded, at which point the boys and girls marched in pairs into the hall led by their Principal Herman Lasgaard and Mr. Abraham Poepoe. After all the children took their seats, and after everyone was quiet, Mr. Poepoe prayed thanking God for this great assembly and asking God to bless each of the children graduating from the school and to bless them with jobs that will benefit their lives and their parents, and in their areas.

The decoration above this place was beautiful, with flowers and the words “ALOHA” CLASS 1941, with akulikuli flower fashioned on ti leaves. The hall was also filled with parents and friends, totaling some 500 or more perhaps.


On Tuesday at half past one, 81 children graduated from the ninth grade of that school. The hall was filled once again with parents and friends. Seen were gifts of flowers and other presents brought by the parents and friends for their children to give them joy for their graduating from this grade of the school.

Some of the Hawaiian children who properly graduated from the 12th grade of the High School were Daisey Lindsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Lindsey of Kamuela; Betty Herrman, daughter of Mrs. Camella Hermann of Haina; Henry Keomalu Jr., son of Mr. Henry Keomalu, teacher at Kaapahu School, and residing at Kalopa.


At 11 o’clock on this past Friday, the electric bell of Honokaa School sounded, telling the teachers and the all of the children of the school that the time for school was over, and that it was vacation. That song was sung, “What ALOHA Means.” And the children were dismissed to go home. A number of teachers got in their cars and went to Hilo to get there before the plane for Honolulu left. They went off to San Francisco to attend as Representatives to the Great Teacher Conference of America. Some teachers remained at home to vacation.

[Congratulations to all the keiki graduating this year (and their families) in Hamakua and across the archipelago! Be safe out there.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 6/11/1941, p. 1)

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Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVI, Number 7, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1941.

 

 

Kamehameha Song Contest winners! 1945.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

CONTEST WINNERS
By Fletcher Aleong

Entering their seventh and last song contest as heavy favorites, the senior class of KSB triumphed again by winning their sixth consecutive annual song fest Sunday, March 4 with 176 points.

Led by Henry Chai, who has been director for four years, this 61 voice chorus, trained by Sgt. Olaf Frodsham for the past four years, sang a medley of “Aloha Oe” and “Na Lei O Hawaii” for their choice selection.

The seniors were awarded the George A. Andrus cup by defeating the tenth and eleventh grades in senior division competition. The junior division winner was the ninth grade by rating higher than the eighth grade group was awarded the Richard H. Trent trophy.

“Pu’uwa’awa’a” and “Malana’i Anu Ka Makani” were the prize songs chosen by the music department of KSB for the senior and junior divisions. Mr. Frank Kernohan and Mr. William Sievers, music instructors at the school for boys, assisted the senior and junior divisions.

The class of 1946, juniors, placed second in the senior division with 166 points. Edwin Beamer, grandson of Peter Beamer of Hilo, led the juniors for his fifth consecutive competition. It’s choice song was “Wailana.”

Placing third in the same division was the sophmore class who received 156 points. A meley of three songs “Kuu Lei Pikake,” “Lei Awapuhi” and “Roselani” served as their choice selection. Cleighton Beamer, another grandson of Peter Beamer of Hilo, directed the class of 1947. Continue reading

Kamehameha Song Contest past, 1945.

[Found under: “News From Boys, Girls Kamehameha School]

BOY’S SONG CONTEST

Kamehameha School for Boys will present its 24 annual song contest on March 4 at the school auditorium with the eight and ninth graders competing in the junior division and the tenth, eleventh and twelfth grade boys in the senior division.

The eighth graders have their choice song “Beautiful Kahana” and the ninth graders choice is “Ka Anoi.” The juniors have selected “Wai Lana” [Wailana] and the tenth grade boys a medley of “Kuu Lei Pikake,” “Lei Awapuhi” and “Roselani.” A medley of “Na Lei O Hawaii” and “Aloha Oe” is the senior choice. Continue reading