Double wedding at the home of Samuel Parker, Minister of Foreign Affairs, 1892.

Double Wedding.

At the hour of 11 in the midday, April 26, at the festooned residence here in Honolulu nei of His Excellency [ka Mea Mahalo ia] Samuel Parker, Minister of Foreign Affairs, joined together by Rev. A. Mackintosh were Charles Maguire and Miss Mary H. Parker, the first born of the Minister, honored by the groomsman and bridesmaid [ku aoao], Palmer Woods and Miss Kamakee Cummins. At the same time and place, by that same pastor, Mr. Robert R. Hind Jr. and Miss Hannah Low were joined together, honored by the groomsman and bridesmaid, William Wright and Miss Hassinger. Amongst those who came to witness this distinguished marriage were the Alii the Queen, Continue reading

“Nohea” and “Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona” being performed, 1920.

Band Concert

The Hawaiian Band will give a concert at 3 o’clock this afternoon in Kapiolani Park, the program for the occasion being the following:

Old Hundred

March—United Liberty, Losey
(a) Mystery, Johnson
(b) Starlight Love, Denni
Song—That Wonderful Mother of Mine, Gooding
Overture—William Tell, Rossini
Songs—Band Glee Club
(a) Nuuanu Waipuna, Major Kealakai
(b) Nohea, Queen Liliu
(c) Uluhua, Robert
(d) Ko Ua kilihune o kona [Ka Ua Kilihune o Kona], Queen Liliu
Clarinet Solo—Somnambula, Thornton
Waltz—Jolly Fellows, Vollstedt
Intermezzo—Elegante, Offenbach
March—Bright Eyes, Hoschna
Hawaii Ponoi
The Star Spangled Banner

(PCA, 12/12/1920, p. 3)

Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume LXIII, Number 12170, Page 3. December 12, 1920.

A petition to keep Kalani Peters as bandmaster of the Royal Hawaiian Band, 1917.

Desire of Some to Retain Peter Kalani

At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] on Tuesday night, a letter signed by voters of the 4th and 5th Districts was read, pertaining to retaining once again Peter Kalani as the bandmaster of the Hawaiian Band, instead of Baker [Robert Hoapili Baker], who was appointed as bandmaster to take his place. Continue reading

Peter Kalani, new bandmaster, 1915.

QUEEN CONGRATULATES BANDMASTER KALANI

Peter Kalani, the newly appointed bandmaster, beat the measure with his official baton yesterday for the first time, at a morning concert given in Queen Liliuokalani’s grounds. Continue reading

Death of Clive Kalani Peter, aka Kalani Peters, 1920.

LAYS ASIDE BATON

Prof. Kalani Peter, former leader of the Hawaiian band, who died last night after a short illness.

FORMER HAWAIIAN BAND LEADER VICTIM OF FLU

Prof. Kalani Peter, former leader of Hawaiian band, died of influenza early last night at his home, 186 South Beretania street near Emma, after an illness of three days. Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Peter; a mother, Mrs. Kahoiwa Peter; a brother, Henry Peter of the territorial land office, and an uncle, Rev. Samuel K. Kamaiopili. Continue reading

Death of James K. Pohina, 1941.

James K. Pohina, 87, Dies; Rites Saturday

James K. Pohina, 87, retired musician and long known as the oldest member of the Royal Hawaiian band, died at 7:10 p. m. Thursday at  the residence at 2116 Ladd lane. Continue reading

The Royal Hawaiian Band to lose old-timers, 1920.

WANTS TO RETIRE AND RECEIVE A PENSION.

After working as a musician in the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] for 51 years, James Pohina, one of the oldest persons working with the band, decided he was at a place where he would retire with a pension from the county government. Continue reading

Death of Samuel K. Kamakaia, 1919.

Obituaries

REV SAMUEL K. KAMAKAIA

Following a long illness Rev. Samuel K. Kamakaia, one of the oldest of the “bandboys” of the Hawaiian band, died yesterday morning at 3:30 o’clock at Queen’s Hospital. The funeral will take place a 3 o’clock this afternoon from Williams’ Undertaking parlors, interment to be in Puea Cemetery. Continue reading

No fooling in Lahaina a hundred years ago, 1916.

ALL WERE DELIGHTED

Mr. Sol Hanohano, Aloha oe:—Please allow me some open space on the wings of  the seagull of ours, so the words above have somewhere to nest.

While everyone was sitting around in the shade of the ulu grove of Lele, enjoying the softly blowing Ma-aa breeze, the local wind of the land, the people were surprised to see a notice put up: “Band concert tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock p.m. The Lahaina Public Band will give a public concert under the banyan tree, court house grounds. All welcome! Come one! Come all!”

And being that it was on the 1st of April that this announcement was seen, and the words said that it was the following day at 3 o’clock p.m. that the band would play, Apr. 2, 1916, the announcement was not reliable, because it was the 1st of April, maybe the intent of that announcement is an April Fool; so when going to the place directed, you would find something like the kids saying, “Go to school, tell your teacher you’re a fool,” but for this,  “Go to courthouse grounds, and call yourself you’re a fool!”

But these guesses were put aside until the prescribed time was at hand, and the band members were indeed seen seated in the place made ready for them. And for the first time, the realization came that this was not an April fool.

When the clock struck 3 o’clock, we saw Lowell Kupau bow and as he rose up he was holding his instrument, and with a wink of an eye, the voice of the band burst forth. It was just so lovely! it was a beauty that could not be faulted for they were only taught for a very short few days. The songs played were “Kaua i ka la i pohina,” “Silver Threads Amongst the Gold,” “Maui Beauty me Roselani,” composed by William J. Coelho. “Maui no ka oi,” composed by Rev. S. Kapu, “Mai poina oe ia’u,” and “Aloha oe.” “Hawaii Ponoi.” Continue reading

The death of Kaoleioku Pauli, 1874.

O PAULI, ALOHA

This past Tuesday, the 30th of December, at 7 o’clock in the evening, Kaoleioku Pauli left this earthly body and silently went on to the hidden pathway of Kanaloa; to return to the slumber of Niolopua, the eternal rest.

He was a man who was often seen in the royal courts of Hawaii nei, and he was a chief born of the land as shown in the genealogy chart below:

Keawe (m) dwelt with Lonomaaikanaka (f), begot was Kalaninuiiamamao (m); Kalaninuiiamamao (m) dwelt with Kamakaimoku, begot was Kalaniopuu (m); Kalaniopuu (m) dwelt with Ahia (f), begot was Kekuehoa (f); Kekuehoa dwelt with Kamahinakauloa (m), begot was Kaiakuilani (f); Kaiakauilani dwelt with Puumahiole (m), begot was Haumea (m); Haumea dwelt with Paaluhi (f), begot was Pauli; and he married Wakeki, but they have no offsrping. But it is sad that it was revealed that his wife is now pregnant with child, and perhaps the blood of Pauli will be begotten anew, and the name Kaoleioku Pauli will be given.

Pauli was born at Keauhou, in North Kona, Hawaii, on the 22nd of November 1836, and therefore he reached 37 years old and 1 month and 7 days.

He began playing the band during the time it was lead by William Merseburgh [?? Uilama Olelo-e], and he was the only student left from the band of the Kings, from Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III to Lunalilo, and while in that occupation, he fell. He was a man that was skilled at singing, and he was the greatest of Hawaiians in his deep knowledge of singing; and he greatly assisted in leading the choir of Kawaiahao; and he was always seen in front of song concerts with the alii Pauahi and Kamakaeha.

He was assigned by the Board of Education as a singing teacher for the government school for the district of Kona, Honolulu, and while in that position he let go of his burdens.

Pau ka lohe ana i kana ohe,
Ke kani kapalili mai i Iolani,
Pau ka lohe’a ana o kona leo,
Ma na paia eehia o Kawaiahao,
E na keiki kula, ua hele ke kumu,
Ua hele ka makua nana e ao mai,
Ma na anuu leo o na leo mele,
E Pauli e, aloha, aloha pau ole!
Imia ou mau kupuna alii,
Aia ia i ka lewanuu i ka lewa lani,
Aia ma ke ala polikua a Kane,
Imiia a loaa ou mau kini,
I hookahi ka noho’na i ka hale anuanu.

[No more will we hear wind instrument,
Its trilling song from Iolani,
No more will his voice be heard,
In the solemn walls of Kawaiahao,
O Schoolchildren, your teacher has gone,
Went is the father who taught,
The intervals in singing,
O Pauli, aloha, our never-ending aloha!
Seek out your chiefly ancestors,
They are in the sky up above, the sky in the heaven,
On the dark path of Kane,
Search out and find your relatives,
You will live as one in the cold house.

This is not the Pauli Kaoleioku who was the son of Kamehameha I and Kanekapolei.]

(Nuhou, 1/6/1874, p. 6)

Nuhou_1_6_1874_6

Ka Nuhou Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Ianuari 6, 1874.