A petition to keep Kalani Peters as bandmaster of the Royal Hawaiian Band, 1917.

Desire of Some to Retain Peter Kalani

At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] on Tuesday night, a letter signed by voters of the 4th and 5th Districts was read, pertaining to retaining once again Peter Kalani as the bandmaster of the Hawaiian Band, instead of Baker [Robert Hoapili Baker], who was appointed as bandmaster to take his place. Continue reading

Peter Kalani, new bandmaster, 1915.

QUEEN CONGRATULATES BANDMASTER KALANI

Peter Kalani, the newly appointed bandmaster, beat the measure with his official baton yesterday for the first time, at a morning concert given in Queen Liliuokalani’s grounds. Continue reading

Death of Clive Kalani Peter, aka Kalani Peters, 1920.

LAYS ASIDE BATON

Prof. Kalani Peter, former leader of the Hawaiian band, who died last night after a short illness.

FORMER HAWAIIAN BAND LEADER VICTIM OF FLU

Prof. Kalani Peter, former leader of Hawaiian band, died of influenza early last night at his home, 186 South Beretania street near Emma, after an illness of three days. Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Elizabeth Peter; a mother, Mrs. Kahoiwa Peter; a brother, Henry Peter of the territorial land office, and an uncle, Rev. Samuel K. Kamaiopili. Continue reading

Death of James K. Pohina, 1941.

James K. Pohina, 87, Dies; Rites Saturday

James K. Pohina, 87, retired musician and long known as the oldest member of the Royal Hawaiian band, died at 7:10 p. m. Thursday at  the residence at 2116 Ladd lane. Continue reading

The Royal Hawaiian Band to lose old-timers, 1920.

WANTS TO RETIRE AND RECEIVE A PENSION.

After working as a musician in the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] for 51 years, James Pohina, one of the oldest persons working with the band, decided he was at a place where he would retire with a pension from the county government. Continue reading

Death of Samuel K. Kamakaia, 1919.

Obituaries

REV SAMUEL K. KAMAKAIA

Following a long illness Rev. Samuel K. Kamakaia, one of the oldest of the “bandboys” of the Hawaiian band, died yesterday morning at 3:30 o’clock at Queen’s Hospital. The funeral will take place a 3 o’clock this afternoon from Williams’ Undertaking parlors, interment to be in Puea Cemetery. Continue reading

No fooling in Lahaina a hundred years ago, 1916.

ALL WERE DELIGHTED

Mr. Sol Hanohano, Aloha oe:—Please allow me some open space on the wings of  the seagull of ours, so the words above have somewhere to nest.

While everyone was sitting around in the shade of the ulu grove of Lele, enjoying the softly blowing Ma-aa breeze, the local wind of the land, the people were surprised to see a notice put up: “Band concert tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock p.m. The Lahaina Public Band will give a public concert under the banyan tree, court house grounds. All welcome! Come one! Come all!”

And being that it was on the 1st of April that this announcement was seen, and the words said that it was the following day at 3 o’clock p.m. that the band would play, Apr. 2, 1916, the announcement was not reliable, because it was the 1st of April, maybe the intent of that announcement is an April Fool; so when going to the place directed, you would find something like the kids saying, “Go to school, tell your teacher you’re a fool,” but for this,  “Go to courthouse grounds, and call yourself you’re a fool!”

But these guesses were put aside until the prescribed time was at hand, and the band members were indeed seen seated in the place made ready for them. And for the first time, the realization came that this was not an April fool.

When the clock struck 3 o’clock, we saw Lowell Kupau bow and as he rose up he was holding his instrument, and with a wink of an eye, the voice of the band burst forth. It was just so lovely! it was a beauty that could not be faulted for they were only taught for a very short few days. The songs played were “Kaua i ka la i pohina,” “Silver Threads Amongst the Gold,” “Maui Beauty me Roselani,” composed by William J. Coelho. “Maui no ka oi,” composed by Rev. S. Kapu, “Mai poina oe ia’u,” and “Aloha oe.” “Hawaii Ponoi.” Continue reading

The death of Kaoleioku Pauli, 1874.

O PAULI, ALOHA

This past Tuesday, the 30th of December, at 7 o’clock in the evening, Kaoleioku Pauli left this earthly body and silently went on to the hidden pathway of Kanaloa; to return to the slumber of Niolopua, the eternal rest.

He was a man who was often seen in the royal courts of Hawaii nei, and he was a chief born of the land as shown in the genealogy chart below:

Keawe (m) dwelt with Lonomaaikanaka (f), begot was Kalaninuiiamamao (m); Kalaninuiiamamao (m) dwelt with Kamakaimoku, begot was Kalaniopuu (m); Kalaniopuu (m) dwelt with Ahia (f), begot was Kekuehoa (f); Kekuehoa dwelt with Kamahinakauloa (m), begot was Kaiakuilani (f); Kaiakauilani dwelt with Puumahiole (m), begot was Haumea (m); Haumea dwelt with Paaluhi (f), begot was Pauli; and he married Wakeki, but they have no offsrping. But it is sad that it was revealed that his wife is now pregnant with child, and perhaps the blood of Pauli will be begotten anew, and the name Kaoleioku Pauli will be given.

Pauli was born at Keauhou, in North Kona, Hawaii, on the 22nd of November 1836, and therefore he reached 37 years old and 1 month and 7 days.

He began playing the band during the time it was lead by William Merseburgh [?? Uilama Olelo-e], and he was the only student left from the band of the Kings, from Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III to Lunalilo, and while in that occupation, he fell. He was a man that was skilled at singing, and he was the greatest of Hawaiians in his deep knowledge of singing; and he greatly assisted in leading the choir of Kawaiahao; and he was always seen in front of song concerts with the alii Pauahi and Kamakaeha.

He was assigned by the Board of Education as a singing teacher for the government school for the district of Kona, Honolulu, and while in that position he let go of his burdens.

Pau ka lohe ana i kana ohe,
Ke kani kapalili mai i Iolani,
Pau ka lohe’a ana o kona leo,
Ma na paia eehia o Kawaiahao,
E na keiki kula, ua hele ke kumu,
Ua hele ka makua nana e ao mai,
Ma na anuu leo o na leo mele,
E Pauli e, aloha, aloha pau ole!
Imia ou mau kupuna alii,
Aia ia i ka lewanuu i ka lewa lani,
Aia ma ke ala polikua a Kane,
Imiia a loaa ou mau kini,
I hookahi ka noho’na i ka hale anuanu.

[No more will we hear wind instrument,
Its trilling song from Iolani,
No more will his voice be heard,
In the solemn walls of Kawaiahao,
O Schoolchildren, your teacher has gone,
Went is the father who taught,
The intervals in singing,
O Pauli, aloha, our never-ending aloha!
Seek out your chiefly ancestors,
They are in the sky up above, the sky in the heaven,
On the dark path of Kane,
Search out and find your relatives,
You will live as one in the cold house.

This is not the Pauli Kaoleioku who was the son of Kamehameha I and Kanekapolei.]

(Nuhou, 1/6/1874, p. 6)

Nuhou_1_6_1874_6

Ka Nuhou Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Ianuari 6, 1874.

50th Anniversary of the Bana Hawaii, 1919

Pictures 1—The Hawaiian Band taken in San Francisco in 1883. 2—The band on the steps of the new Palace and the Executive Building [Hale Mana Hooko] today, taken in 1884. The new uniforms of the boys seen in this picture was sent by mistake from America to Honduras, Central America. 3—The Band lead by [Jose S.] Libornio that refused to swear under the Provisional Government in 1893. 4—The picture of J. K. Pohina [James K. Pohina], the only man left of the 26 who established the band 50 years ago, who is still with the Hawaiian Band. 5—The band at the Golden Gate, of San Francisco, at a banquet in 1895. 6—The band today at their new home on Waiakamilo Street, Kalihi. 7—The Bana Hawaii leading the parade of the Great Secret Society Knights Templars in San Francisco, August 20, 1883.

50 YEARS SINCE THE FORMATION OF THE BANA HAWAII

When Kamehameha V was ruling fifty years ago, the Hawaiian Band was established by a British man named Mr. Northcett, under orders of the King. On that day 26 young men were chosen for the band from the reformatory school of Keoneula, and the teaching of this knowledge to them was immediately began. The king had this idea first and so brass instruments were ordered earlier and they arrived here in Honolulu before he chose Mr. Northcett as the instructor to teach the boys. Continue reading

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.