No fooling in Lahaina a hundred years ago, 1916.

ALL WERE DELIGHTED

Mr. Sol Hanohano, Aloha oe:—Please allow me some open space on the wings of  the seagull of ours, so the words above have somewhere to nest.

While everyone was sitting around in the shade of the ulu grove of Lele, enjoying the softly blowing Ma-aa breeze, the local wind of the land, the people were surprised to see a notice put up: “Band concert tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock p.m. The Lahaina Public Band will give a public concert under the banyan tree, court house grounds. All welcome! Come one! Come all!”

And being that it was on the 1st of April that this announcement was seen, and the words said that it was the following day at 3 o’clock p.m. that the band would play, Apr. 2, 1916, the announcement was not reliable, because it was the 1st of April, maybe the intent of that announcement is an April Fool; so when going to the place directed, you would find something like the kids saying, “Go to school, tell your teacher you’re a fool,” but for this,  “Go to courthouse grounds, and call yourself you’re a fool!”

But these guesses were put aside until the prescribed time was at hand, and the band members were indeed seen seated in the place made ready for them. And for the first time, the realization came that this was not an April fool.

When the clock struck 3 o’clock, we saw Lowell Kupau bow and as he rose up he was holding his instrument, and with a wink of an eye, the voice of the band burst forth. It was just so lovely! it was a beauty that could not be faulted for they were only taught for a very short few days. The songs played were “Kaua i ka la i pohina,” “Silver Threads Amongst the Gold,” “Maui Beauty me Roselani,” composed by William J. Coelho. “Maui no ka oi,” composed by Rev. S. Kapu, “Mai poina oe ia’u,” and “Aloha oe.” “Hawaii Ponoi.” Continue reading

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The death of Kaoleioku Pauli, 1874.

O PAULI, ALOHA

This past Tuesday, the 30th of December, at 7 o’clock in the evening, Kaoleioku Pauli left this earthly body and silently went on to the hidden pathway of Kanaloa; to return to the slumber of Niolopua, the eternal rest.

He was a man who was often seen in the royal courts of Hawaii nei, and he was a chief born of the land as shown in the genealogy chart below:

Keawe (m) dwelt with Lonomaaikanaka (f), begot was Kalaninuiiamamao (m); Kalaninuiiamamao (m) dwelt with Kamakaimoku, begot was Kalaniopuu (m); Kalaniopuu (m) dwelt with Ahia (f), begot was Kekuehoa (f); Kekuehoa dwelt with Kamahinakauloa (m), begot was Kaiakuilani (f); Kaiakauilani dwelt with Puumahiole (m), begot was Haumea (m); Haumea dwelt with Paaluhi (f), begot was Pauli; and he married Wakeki, but they have no offsrping. But it is sad that it was revealed that his wife is now pregnant with child, and perhaps the blood of Pauli will be begotten anew, and the name Kaoleioku Pauli will be given.

Pauli was born at Keauhou, in North Kona, Hawaii, on the 22nd of November 1836, and therefore he reached 37 years old and 1 month and 7 days.

He began playing the band during the time it was lead by William Merseburgh [?? Uilama Olelo-e], and he was the only student left from the band of the Kings, from Kauikeaouli Kamehameha III to Lunalilo, and while in that occupation, he fell. He was a man that was skilled at singing, and he was the greatest of Hawaiians in his deep knowledge of singing; and he greatly assisted in leading the choir of Kawaiahao; and he was always seen in front of song concerts with the alii Pauahi and Kamakaeha.

He was assigned by the Board of Education as a singing teacher for the government school for the district of Kona, Honolulu, and while in that position he let go of his burdens.

Pau ka lohe ana i kana ohe,
Ke kani kapalili mai i Iolani,
Pau ka lohe’a ana o kona leo,
Ma na paia eehia o Kawaiahao,
E na keiki kula, ua hele ke kumu,
Ua hele ka makua nana e ao mai,
Ma na anuu leo o na leo mele,
E Pauli e, aloha, aloha pau ole!
Imia ou mau kupuna alii,
Aia ia i ka lewanuu i ka lewa lani,
Aia ma ke ala polikua a Kane,
Imiia a loaa ou mau kini,
I hookahi ka noho’na i ka hale anuanu.

[No more will we hear wind instrument,
Its trilling song from Iolani,
No more will his voice be heard,
In the solemn walls of Kawaiahao,
O Schoolchildren, your teacher has gone,
Went is the father who taught,
The intervals in singing,
O Pauli, aloha, our never-ending aloha!
Seek out your chiefly ancestors,
They are in the sky up above, the sky in the heaven,
On the dark path of Kane,
Search out and find your relatives,
You will live as one in the cold house.

This is not the Pauli Kaoleioku who was the son of Kamehameha I and Kanekapolei.]

(Nuhou, 1/6/1874, p. 6)

Nuhou_1_6_1874_6

Ka Nuhou Hawaii, Buke I, Helu 10, Aoao 6. Ianuari 6, 1874.

50th Anniversary of the Bana Hawaii, 1919

Pictures 1—The Hawaiian Band taken in San Francisco in 1883. 2—The band on the steps of the new Palace and the Executive Building [Hale Mana Hooko] today, taken in 1884. The new uniforms of the boys seen in this picture was sent by mistake from America to Honduras, Central America. 3—The Band lead by [Jose S.] Libornio that refused to swear under the Provisional Government in 1893. 4—The picture of J. K. Pohina [James K. Pohina], the only man left of the 26 who established the band 50 years ago, who is still with the Hawaiian Band. 5—The band at the Golden Gate, of San Francisco, at a banquet in 1895. 6—The band today at their new home on Waiakamilo Street, Kalihi. 7—The Bana Hawaii leading the parade of the Great Secret Society Knights Templars in San Francisco, August 20, 1883.

50 YEARS SINCE THE FORMATION OF THE BANA HAWAII

When Kamehameha V was ruling fifty years ago, the Hawaiian Band was established by a British man named Mr. Northcett, under orders of the King. On that day 26 young men were chosen for the band from the reformatory school of Keoneula, and the teaching of this knowledge to them was immediately began. The king had this idea first and so brass instruments were ordered earlier and they arrived here in Honolulu before he chose Mr. Northcett as the instructor to teach the boys. Continue reading

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

Hauoli La Hanau, e Kaleiohawaii! 1877.

Held with much celebration was the birthday of the Princess Victoria Kaiulani Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaleiohawaii, the first-born daughter of Her Highness the Alii the Princess Miriam Likelike and Hon. A. S. Cleghorn, on her second birthday, on this past October 16th, at Waikiki Kai, by way of the holding of a banquet laden with much food.

This day was greatly honored by the arrival of the Alii, the King, and by the great attendance of the Officers from foreign nations, the Captains of the warships, the domestic Officers, and the prominent ones of Honolulu nei. Also present was the band of the King, which entertained folks with their songs.

(Kuokoa, 10/20/1877, p. 2)

Ua malamaia ma ke ano hoomanao mahuahua loa...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 20, 1877.

Famous singer, John Sumner Ellis, passes on, 1914.

VOICE OF SINGER FOREVER STILLED

John Sumner Ellis, Who Made Hawaiian Melody Popular on Mainland, Called by Death.

(From Thursday Advertiser.)

Following an illness of nine months, John Sumner Ellis, known as Hawaii’s premier tenor singer, died Tuesday afternoon shortly before five o’clock at the home of Deputy County Clerk Eugene D. Buffandeau, 1205 Alexander street, his brother-in-law.

Ellis was a victim of tuberculosis, which he contracted in the East. He…

JOHN SUMNER ELLIS

…returned to Honolulu three weeks ago with the avowed intention of seeing his beloved island home before he passed away. His wish was gratified to the extent that he died in his native land, surrounded by the friends of his boyhood.

The funeral will take place at ten o’clock this morning from the undertaking parlors of H. H. Williams, Fort street. Ellis’ remains will be buried in the family plot in Nuuanu cemetery.

Ellis was born in Honolulu on April 11, 1877, and would have been thirty-seven years of age on April 11 of this year had he lived. He was the son of the late Charles K. Ellis, who was at one time connected with the old Honolulu Iron Works, and Nancy Sumner Ellis, and a grand nephew of John Sumner, Honolulu’s well known pioneer.

Mourning his loss and surviving him are his wife, who was Mrs. May Barnard, and who married him in Chicago in 1909; his six-year old stepdaughter; William Sumner Ellis, a brother, and also a well known singer who resided now in New York, and Mrs. Victoria Buffandeau, of Honolulu, a sister. He also leaves a fourteen-year-old son who resides in San Francisco with his mother, Ellis’ divorced wife. Willie Davis, of Honolulu, is a cousin of the deceased.

John Sumner Ellis was educated in St. Louis College of this city, where he early made a mark as a singer. He was a member of the college band and after leaving school joined the Royal Hawaiian Band under Capt. Henri Berger. Ellis will be remembered as one of the foremost players with the Maile football eleven in the nineties.

Ellis was a member of Ernest Kaai’s well known musical organization when it first started out. He left the Islands on May 30, 1905, almost nine years ago, with “Sonny” Cunha’s Hawaiian quintet for a tour of the mainland. When this organization returned to Honolulu Ellis remained on the mainland, singing in vaudeville in the East. He was employed for a long time by the Hawaii Promotion Committee. He sang in grand opera shortly before being attacked with the disease which finally put an untimely end to his promising career.

He was possessed of an unusually sweet tenor voice wherever on the mainland he sang Hawaii’s plaintive airs he immediately became a favorite. Ellis was instrumental, probably more so than any other Hawaiian singer, in popularizing Hawaiian melodies on the mainland and especially in the east. He was attractive in appearance, well mannered and readily made lasting friends. With his passing away Hawaii has lost a son who was a credit to her, both at home and abroad.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/27/1914, p. 5)

VOICE OF SINGER FOREVER STILLED

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume VII, Number 17, Page 5. February 27, 1914.

A name song for the boys of the Royal Hawaiian Band, 1893.

HE INOA NO NA KEIKI O KA BANA LAHUI.

Kaulana na pua a o Hawaii
Kupaa mahope o ka aina
Hiki mai ka Elele a ka lokoino
Palapala alunu me ka pakaha
Pane mai Hawaii Nui o Keawe
Kokua na Hono a o Piilani
Kakoo mai Kauai a o Mano
Pau pu me ke one Kakuhihewa
Aole e kau i ka pulima
Maluna o ka pepa a ka enemi
Aole makou a e minamina
I ka puu dala o ke Aupuni
Ua lawa makou i ka pohaku
I ka ai kamahao o ka aina
Hoohui Aina kuai hewa
I ka pono Kivila a o ke kanaka
Mahope makou o ka Moi
A kau hou i ka Noho Kalaunu
Haina mai ana ka puana
No ka poe i aloha i ka Aina

(Hawaii Holomua, 3/23/1893, p. 2)

HE INOA NO NA KEIKI O KA BANA LAHUI.

Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 185, Aoao 2. Maraki 23, 1893.