Disparity, 1917.

GONE IN THE WASTE BASKET

The news was told in our office, the laws to give pensions to some Hawaiians who served for many years in government jobs like James Pohina, S. Kamakaia, George Waipa, and some other Hawaiians. Continue reading

Theresa Wilcox Belliveau to serve sentence, 1919.

THERESA BEGINS HER PRISON TERM

Mrs. Theresa Wilcox Belliveau, often called “Princess” Theresa, began serving yesterday her three-year sentence of imprisonment. She and James M. Kealoha were convicted by a jury in Judge Heen’s division of the circuit court of conspiracy in connection with a forged instrument purporting to have been a last will of the late Queen Liliuokalani. Continue reading

Death of Samuel K. Kamakaia, 1919.

Obituaries

REV SAMUEL K. KAMAKAIA

Following a long illness Rev. Samuel K. Kamakaia, one of the oldest of the “bandboys” of the Hawaiian band, died yesterday morning at 3:30 o’clock at Queen’s Hospital. The funeral will take place a 3 o’clock this afternoon from Williams’ Undertaking parlors, interment to be in Puea Cemetery. Continue reading

Samuel Kamakea Kamakaia’s medal from King Kalakaua to go to Bishop Museum? 1919.

Medal Kalakaua I Gave Sam Kamakaia Passed to Bandsman

A silver medal awarded by King Kalakaua to Sam Kamakaia, who died Monday morning at the Queen’s Hospital, who was formerly a member of the Hawaiian Band, is now in the possession on Malulani Beckley Kahea, also a bandsman, to be retained by him until it may be necessary to transfer it to another bandsman, but according to the dying wish of Kamakaia it is eventually to go to the Bishop Museum. Continue reading

Passing of Samuel Kamakea Kamakaia, 1919.

AN EXPRESSION OF LOVE FOR SAM KAMAKEA KAMAKAIA.

Samuel K. Kamakaia.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa Newspaper, Much aloha to you:—Please place in one of your open columns of the speedy messenger of the emotional and dreadful story below of my dear husband, my companion, partner who I talked to, and the one I faced the hardships of this life, who left me and his great many friends and intimates; so that his friends and many intimates from the wind-facing promontory that gazes at the rain blown upon the sea at Kumukahi all the way to where the sun sinks at the base of Lehua, that Samuel Kamakea Kamakaia has passed on to the path to the back of Kane, and you will no more see his features, you will no more hear his voice, he sleeps the eternal sleep, and it is for him that I mourn with tears and regret not to be pacified, while I remember his words that I cannot forget:

Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his!Continue reading

I hookahi, kahi ka manao, 1897.

LET US BE OF ONE SHOULDER,¹ LET US BE OF UNIFIED THOUGHT.

At the meeting of the Executive Committee of the “Ahahui Hawaii Aloha Aina” [Hawaiian Patriotic League] at noon, 12 o’clock, at the attorney’s office of President Kaulia, the said Executive Committee decided that the Patriotic League will join and support the great rally of the makaainana of the lahui to absolutely protest the annexation of Hawaii to America, and it is announced to all of the members of the Hawaiian Patriotic League, from the men, to the women, to the children, to assemble at the Palace Square [Kuea Pa Alii] tomorrow evening (Friday) at exactly 7 o’clock, and there will be presented with insistence and unity, the resolution informing the President of the Senate and the people of the United States, that the native Hawaiians and the long-time makaainana protest the annexation of Hawaii to the United States of America.

Let us combine our prayers to overcome Hakalau. [E alu ka pule ia Hakalau.]²

James Keauiluna Kaulia

President of the Ahahui Hawaii Aloha Aina.

¹Hearkening to the idea of “I hookahi umauma, i hookahi poohiwi, a i hookahi puuwai.” [Let us be of one chest, one shoulder, and of one heart.] Also from earlier that year, see by Samuel K. Kamakaia, “Nai Wale no Oukou A’oe Pau.”

²According to Mary Kawena Pukui’s Olelo Noeau (115): “A sorcerer at Hakalau once created havoc in his own and other neighborhoods. Many attempts to counter-pray him failed until a visiting kahuna suggested that all of the others band together to concentrate on the common enemy. This time they succeeded.”

(Aloha Aina, 10/9/1897, p. 3)

I HOOKAHI POOHIWI, I HOOKAHI, KAHI KA MANAO.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 41, Aoao 3. Okatoba 9, 1897.

E Nai Wale No Oukou… 1897.

NAI WALE NO OUKOU AO’E PAU

1. E Hawaii Nui kuauli,
E na Honoapiilani,
Oahu o Kakuhihewa,
Kauai o Manokalani.

Cho. E nai wale no oukou,
I kuu pono ao’e pau,
I ka pono kumu o Hawaii,
E mau e ka Ea o ka aina i ka pono.

2. He leo aloha i pae mai,
Mai na kukulu mai o Kahiki,
E i mai ana ia oe e Hawaii,
E malama i ka maluhia.

3. I hookahi kahi ka manao,
I hookahi kahi ke aloha,
I hookahi kahi puuwai,
E malama i ka maluhia.

Composed by
Samuel K. Kamakaia.

[Another well-known mele, with a few noticeable differences from what is sung today. The repeated line “E malama i ka maluhia.” would be “Keep the peace.”]

(Aloha Aina, 8/21/1897, p. 7)

NAI WALE NO OUKOU AO'E PAU

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 7. Augate 21, 1897.