Great Meeting of December 28, 1891 at Manamana, 1891.

MASS MEETING.

The Native Sons of Hawaii to the Front.

RESOLUTIONS AGAINST A REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT ADOPTED.

Over six hundred people, Hawaiians and foreigners, were present at the mass meeting called by the Native Sons of Hawaii, and held at the Gymnasium on Monday evening. Many prominent natives were present and listened to the discourses of their wise leaders with attentive ears. Long before 7 o’clock streams of people were seen wending their way towards the Gymnasium. The Royal Hawaiian Band, under the leadership of Prof. D. K. Naone, was stationed on the makai end of the hall, and discoursed most eloquent music for over thirty minutes.

J. K. Kaulia, the Secretary of the Native Sons of Hawaii, called the meeting to order at 7:45 p. m.

Hon. A. Rosa was elected chairman of the meeting. On taking the chair, he said that he came as spectator only. He was not a candidate for the coming elections, and he was not a member of the society. He asked the audience to conduct the meting in an orderly manner, so that nothing would mar the success of the object in view.

Isaac D. Iaea was chosen secretary and Mr. Rosa interpreted the speeches in English.

The Chairman called upon the Rev. J. Waiamau to open the meeting with prayer which was done.

A. Rosa said: The subject for discussion this evening is, “Our denunciation against adopting a Republican for of Government for Hawaii.” You are at liberty to express your views, whether pro or con. The first speaker—J. L. Kaulukou—will speak against the Republican movement. The time allotted to each speaker is limited to ten minutes.

J. L. Kaulukou—Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: We are assembled here to-night because false rumors are being propagated abroad that we, native sons of the soil of Hawaii, are in favor of a Republican form of Government. Our bitterest enemies are doing their utmost to spread this unfounded report. It is our duty tonight at a mass meeting assembled, to notify the world at large that the aboriginal Hawaiians are body and soul against such a movement. We do not favor annexation either with America or with any other foreign power. We have called this meeting because foreigners abroad are entertaining this idea, which is most derogatory to our interests. Hawaiians are not the only one concerned in this question; foreigners, too, who have adopted Hawaii as their home; they have a right to stand up and denounce this movement. [Applause.[ A queen now reigns over us. It is our duty as loyal citizens to do our utmost to perpetuate the throne of Hawaii. England cherishes her Queen, and we should adore our Queen. Our ancestors have been accustomed to a monarchial form of government, and we, the younger generations, have been instilled with undying loyalty to our sovereign. Our forefathers considered “love of the throne, love of country and love of the people” as one, but we have divided it into three distinct persons. I will now read to you the following resolutions, carefully prepared by a committee of the Native Sons of Hawaii: Continue reading

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Queen Liliuokalani at La Kuokoa celebration, 1896.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.”]

J. K. Kaulia, president-elect of the Hui Aloha Aina, entertained the delegates and other friends at his residence on Saturday. The Hawaiian flag was in evidence, and also hoisted on the new flag staff for the first time in recognition  of Independence. Queen Liliuokalani was present.

(Independent, 11/30/1896, p. 3)

independent_11_30_1896_3

The Independent, Volume III, Number 444, Page 3. November 30, 1896.

Maintain the peace, 1894.

Announcement of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.

Keep the Peace.

I have been ordered by the Executive Committee [Aha Hooko] of the Central Hawaiian Patriotic League of Honolulu, to instruct all of the Leaders and the members of the Ahahui Aloha Aina across the Archipelago, being that it is known that on the 4th of July, 1894, on that day, the Provisional Government will proclaim a new Constitution, and the Republic of Hawaii, and at that time, or perhaps before that time, perhaps Martial Law [Kanawai Koa] will be proclaimed. Continue reading

Memorial of the Hawaiian People, 1893.

PETITION

—OF THE—

Hawaiian Natives.

A Committee of 5 members was chosen to take the Petition [Memoriala] of the Hawaiian People which was unanimously passed by the Delegates sent by all of the Districts from all over the Archipelago to the Convention of Delegates, before the Honorable James H. Blount, by the Hawaiian Patriotic League [Hui Hawaii Aloha Aina]; and it was divided thusly, with one member from each Island, like this.

COMMITTEE.

John Richardson     Island of Maui.

S. H. K. Ne     ″ Hawaii.

J. K. Kaiheopulani     ″ Molokai.

Ben Naukana     ″ Oahu.

J. A. Akina     ″ Kauai.

John Richardson was the Chairman [Lunahoomalu] of the Committee. It was exactly at 3 o’clock when it was first announced that the Committee arrived; they were cordially welcomed and the petition of the Lahui was read and it was left with the Honorable James H. Blount. The Commissioner conversed briefly with the Representatives, and at their leave, they expressed their appreciation for their treatment; and that the conversation between the commissioner and the committee was congenial.

Memorial of the Hawaiian People to the American People.

Whereas his Excellency [ka Mea Mahaloia] Grover Cleveland, President of the United States of America, has honored the Hawaiian Nation by sending to us the Hon. James H. Blount as a Special Commissioner [Komisina Wae], to find out the true wishes of the Hawaiian People as to the proposed annexation of their country to their great friend the United States, therefore;

We, the people of the Hawaiian Islands, through the delegates of the branches of the Hawaiian Patriotic League [Hui Hawaii Aloha Aina] of all the districts throughout the kingdom, in convention assembled, take this mode of submitting our appeal and expression of our unanimous wishes to the people of our great and good friend, the Republic of the United States of America, with whom we always entertained the most cordial relations, whom we have learned to look upon as our patrons and most reliable protectors, and whose honor, integrity, and sense of justice and equity we have ever confidently relied for investigation into the grievous wrongs that have been committed against us as a people, against the person of our sovereign, and the independence of our land.

And While we are anxious to promote the closest and most intimate political and commercial relations with the United States, we do not believe that the time has yet come for us to be deprived of our nationality and of our sovereign by annexation to any foreign power.

And Therefore we do hereby earnestly and sincerely pray that the great wrongs committed against us may be righted by the restoration of the independent autonomy and constitutional government of our Kingdom under our beloved Queen Liliuokalani, in whom we have the utmost confidence as a conscientious and popular ruler.¹

SIGNED BY THE REPRESENTATIVES FROM ACROSS THE ARCHIPELAGO

North Hilo—D. Hoakimoa

Central Hilo—K. M. Koahou

Hilo Town—Henry West

Puna—S. T. Piihonua

North Kona ————

″     ″—W. E. N. Kanealii

South Kona—C. G. Naope

North Kohala—S. H. K. Ne

Hamakua—J. H. Halawale

Maui.

Lahaina—R. H. Makekau

Waihee—J. K. Kealoalii

South Wailuku—W. B. Keanu

North Wailuku—Thomas Clark

″     ″—T. B. Lyons

″     ″—D. Kanuha

″     ″—J. Richardson

Makawao—J. Kaluna

″    —J. Kamakele

Honuaula—S. D. Kapono jr.

Hana—S. W. Kaai

Molokai.

Kaunakakai—J. N. Uahinui

Pelekunu—D. Himeni

Wailau—Kekoowai

Ualapue—J. K. Kaiheopulani

Kalaupapa—S. K. Kahalehulu

Halawa—A. P. Kapaehaole

Kainalu—S. K. Piiapoo

Oahu.

District One—F. S. Keiki

″ Two—Charles Keawe

″ Three—J. K. Prendergast

″ Four—E. Johnson

″ Five—S. K. Pua

Ewa—J. K. Kauku

″     —D. W. Keliiokamoku

Waianae—S. W. Kailieha

Waialua—Bejamin Naukana

Waimanalo—J. Kimo

Kauai.

Hanalei—Charles Kahee

Kilauea—George W. Mahikoa

Hanapepe—D. W. Kamaliikane

Waimea—J. A. Akina

Wainiha—S. K. Kaleikini

Waioli—J. Molokai

Joseph Nawahi,

President.

J. K. Kaulia

Secretary.

[See also mention of a picture taken of the committee that took the Memoriala to Blount from an earlier post here.]

¹Taken from p. 504 of the Blount Report.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 5/3/1893, p. 2)

MEMORIALA A KA Lahui Hawaii.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 697, Aoao 2. Mei 3, 1893.

Great rally against annexation, 1897.

GREAT GATHERING OF THE PEOPLE

—:FOR THE:—

PROTESTING OF ANNEXATION!

AT THE

Palace Square

ON THIS

FRIDAY NIGHT, OCTOBER 8

7 O’CLOCK p. m.

By this, summoned are all those who are against annexation to gather at the Palace Square, Honolulu, in the evening of Friday, Oct. 8, 1897, at 7 o’clock, to pass a Memorial (Petition) protesting the passing of the bill of annexation, by which they want to join Hawaii to the United States of America.

The invitation is extended to all of the makaainana.

By the summons of the Citizens’ Committee [Komite o ka Lehulehu],

F. J. Testa,
J. K. Kahookano,
C. B. Maile,
S. K. Kamakaia,
S. K. Pua.

—————

We are the two whose names appear below, and from the side of the Hawaiian Patriotic League and Hawaiian Political Association, by this we support and approve the call above, and we summon all the members of those associations mentioned above to go.

James Keauiluna Kaulia,
President of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.

David Kalauokalani,
President of the Hawaiian Political Association.

(Aloha Aina, 10/9/1897, p. 7)

HALAWAI LAHUI NUI

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 41, Aoao 7. Okatoba 9, 1897.

James Keauiluna Kaulia and David Kalauokalani, 1897.

HAWAIIANS EMPHATICALLY OPPOSED TO ANNEXATION.

As president of the Hawaiian Patriotic League of the Hawaiian Islands, I honestly assert from an intimate knowledge of the Hawaiian people that they, men and women, as a race and nation, are emphatically opposed to the annexation of Hawaii to the United States of America or to any other nation.
We love our independence too dearly.
JAMES KEAUILUNA KAULIA.
I, as president of the Hawaiian Political Association of the Hawaiian Islands; affirm and indorse the statement of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.
DAVID KALAUOKALANI.

[Check out the latest in the four-part series by the Hawaiian Patriots Project.

James Keauiluna Kaulia.

And previously:

George Helm and Alice Kamokila Campbell.

And coming up in the near future on the 16 of September, Piilani (the wahine of Kaluaikoolau).]

(San Francisco Call, 9/24/1897, p. 2)

HAWAIIANS EMPHATICALLY OPPOSED TO ANNEXATION.

The San Francisco Call, Volume LXXXII, Number 116, Page 2. September 24, 1897.

Kaulia’s invitation to Morgan, 1897.

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

ANTI-ANNEXATIONIST LEADER SIGNS INVITATION.

Says His People are Anxious to Learn From the Veteran Senator What Annexation Would Mean to Them.

Senator Morgan has accepted the invitation of the native Hawaiians to address them in public meeting upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States.

Among the signers of the invitation is James K. Kaulia, president of the Hawaiian Patriotic League and president of the Aloha Aina Society. Mr. Kaulia is bitterly opposed to annexation and he is at the head of the opposition among his own countrymen. It was Mr. Kaulia who was largely instrumental in getting a few Hawaiians to gather in an abortive mass meeting at the Union Square last month, and adopt the resolutions protesting against annexation which Mr. Kaulia afterwards at the head of a committee of fifteen presented to President Dole and his Cabinet.

Mr. Kaulia states that he as well as the members of the societies he represents are anxious to hear Senator Morgan and they are truly grateful to him that he has consented to speak.

The invitation sent to the Senator, as well as the signers, is a follows:

“Honolulu, Sept. 24, 1897.

“To Senator John T. Morgan, City:

“We the undersigned native Hawaiians desire very much to hear you in an address upon the political relations between Hawaii and the United States and particularly desire your views as to the condition of the native Hawaiians and the position they would occupy under closer political relations with the United States.

“We therefore invite you to deliver a public address to the Hawaiians in this city at your convenience upon the above subjects, and if you accept, will make all necessary provisions for the holding of the meeting.

“Yours very respectfully,

“D. L. NAONE,
“J. KALUA KAHOOKANO,
“J. M. POEPOE,
“R. W. WILCOX,
“JOHN LOT KAULUKOU,
“JAMES K. KAULIA,
“President Hawaiian Patriotic League and President Aloha Aina Society.
“S. M. KAAUKAI.”

The meeting will be held on Thursday evening, at the Opera House, and Senator Morgan states that he will treat the question to the best of his ability.

(Hawaiian Star, 9/28/1897, p. 1)

KAULIA TO HEAR MORGAN

The Hawaiian Star, Volume IV, Number 1386, Page 1. September 28, 1897.