On this birthday of Joseph Nawahi, a reminder that we need to rescan the newspapers! 1896.

HE KANAENAE NO JOSEPH K. NAWAHIOKALANIOPUU.

I aloha ia oe a e Homelani,
O ka Home lei pua lei a ka manu,
Sweet onaona o Hanakahi,
E wehi nei la i Waiakea,
Pulupe i ka Ua Kanilehua,
A Panaewa la e hii mai nei,
Kilakila Hilo one la i ka nani,
Aina kaulana i ka hanohano,
Hanohano Haili i ka pua Lehua,
O ka pua hoohie lei a ka manu,
O ka papahi lei ia o ka aina,
Lei oe lei au i ke onaona,
Ua nani Hawaii ku hanohano,
Helu ekahi o na Ailana, Continue reading

Joseph Nawahi’s account of his first trip to San Francisco, 1874.

Travels to San Francisco.

Early Desire to see Foreign Lands.

DELIGHTING IN THE BEAUTY.

(Written by the Hon. J. Nawahi for the Kuokoa.)

O Kuokoa Newspaper, Aloha oe:—

I give my thanks to you for your kindness in taking my presentation of the things I saw during my travels to San Francisco. But before I begin to tell of the story of this trip, I ask for your kind graciousness in letting me tell of my reason for going to this place, for perhaps some people are mistaken or unclear, according to what I have heard, like what some who seek to deceive have published in a Newspaper while I was in foreign lands. Continue reading

More on art by Nawahi, 1877.

From the Pen of the Hon. J. Nawahi.

Hilo, May 13.—My Dear Whitney, Aloha—It has not been perhaps twelve hours since we met on May 9, and there has arrived fearful news. That being the Tsunami [Kai Hoee] here in Hilo! Here are drawings [paintings?] done right soon after the flooding by the sea which I enclose. [These three pictures of the tsunami exacting its terrible act can be seen in the window of Whitney’s Book Store, Editor.] Continue reading

Early story from Joseph Nawahi, 1861.

An amazing thief!

In a certain town there lived three blind men, and they were seen often by the people of the place. What they did was walk the streets asking for money, food, and other things they needed for their livelihood there. Doing so, they received a lot of money from help given them by the wealthy and due to the aloha from others. They took the money they made everyday and put it in a strong box, and when they left the money, they left the bags as well. One day, they went and came back with bags full of money; the amazing thief saw all that money of the blind men, that there was so much, and he followed them thinking that he would steal it, because he thought they were blind and would not see him steal it, so he approached the blind men when they were entering their house, and when they got to the door, one of the blind men unlocked the door and it opened, and they went in without seeing him, and they immediately locked the door. The blind men opened the money box to count, for they always counted what they had made previously and what they made anew. Continue reading

Maintain the peace, 1894.

Announcement of the Hawaiian Patriotic League.

Keep the Peace.

I have been ordered by the Executive Committee [Aha Hooko] of the Central Hawaiian Patriotic League of Honolulu, to instruct all of the Leaders and the members of the Ahahui Aloha Aina across the Archipelago, being that it is known that on the 4th of July, 1894, on that day, the Provisional Government will proclaim a new Constitution, and the Republic of Hawaii, and at that time, or perhaps before that time, perhaps Martial Law [Kanawai Koa] will be proclaimed. Continue reading

Memorial of the Hawaiian People, 1893.

PETITION

—OF THE—

Hawaiian Natives.

A Committee of 5 members was chosen to take the Petition [Memoriala] of the Hawaiian People which was unanimously passed by the Delegates sent by all of the Districts from all over the Archipelago to the Convention of Delegates, before the Honorable James H. Blount, by the Hawaiian Patriotic League [Hui Hawaii Aloha Aina]; and it was divided thusly, with one member from each Island, like this.

COMMITTEE.

John Richardson     Island of Maui.

S. H. K. Ne     ″ Hawaii.

J. K. Kaiheopulani     ″ Molokai.

Ben Naukana     ″ Oahu.

J. A. Akina     ″ Kauai.

John Richardson was the Chairman [Lunahoomalu] of the Committee. It was exactly at 3 o’clock when it was first announced that the Committee arrived; they were cordially welcomed and the petition of the Lahui was read and it was left with the Honorable James H. Blount. The Commissioner conversed briefly with the Representatives, and at their leave, they expressed their appreciation for their treatment; and that the conversation between the commissioner and the committee was congenial.

Memorial of the Hawaiian People to the American People.

Whereas his Excellency [ka Mea Mahaloia] Grover Cleveland, President of the United States of America, has honored the Hawaiian Nation by sending to us the Hon. James H. Blount as a Special Commissioner [Komisina Wae], to find out the true wishes of the Hawaiian People as to the proposed annexation of their country to their great friend the United States, therefore;

We, the people of the Hawaiian Islands, through the delegates of the branches of the Hawaiian Patriotic League [Hui Hawaii Aloha Aina] of all the districts throughout the kingdom, in convention assembled, take this mode of submitting our appeal and expression of our unanimous wishes to the people of our great and good friend, the Republic of the United States of America, with whom we always entertained the most cordial relations, whom we have learned to look upon as our patrons and most reliable protectors, and whose honor, integrity, and sense of justice and equity we have ever confidently relied for investigation into the grievous wrongs that have been committed against us as a people, against the person of our sovereign, and the independence of our land.

And While we are anxious to promote the closest and most intimate political and commercial relations with the United States, we do not believe that the time has yet come for us to be deprived of our nationality and of our sovereign by annexation to any foreign power.

And Therefore we do hereby earnestly and sincerely pray that the great wrongs committed against us may be righted by the restoration of the independent autonomy and constitutional government of our Kingdom under our beloved Queen Liliuokalani, in whom we have the utmost confidence as a conscientious and popular ruler.¹

SIGNED BY THE REPRESENTATIVES FROM ACROSS THE ARCHIPELAGO

North Hilo—D. Hoakimoa

Central Hilo—K. M. Koahou

Hilo Town—Henry West

Puna—S. T. Piihonua

North Kona ————

″     ″—W. E. N. Kanealii

South Kona—C. G. Naope

North Kohala—S. H. K. Ne

Hamakua—J. H. Halawale

Maui.

Lahaina—R. H. Makekau

Waihee—J. K. Kealoalii

South Wailuku—W. B. Keanu

North Wailuku—Thomas Clark

″     ″—T. B. Lyons

″     ″—D. Kanuha

″     ″—J. Richardson

Makawao—J. Kaluna

″    —J. Kamakele

Honuaula—S. D. Kapono jr.

Hana—S. W. Kaai

Molokai.

Kaunakakai—J. N. Uahinui

Pelekunu—D. Himeni

Wailau—Kekoowai

Ualapue—J. K. Kaiheopulani

Kalaupapa—S. K. Kahalehulu

Halawa—A. P. Kapaehaole

Kainalu—S. K. Piiapoo

Oahu.

District One—F. S. Keiki

″ Two—Charles Keawe

″ Three—J. K. Prendergast

″ Four—E. Johnson

″ Five—S. K. Pua

Ewa—J. K. Kauku

″     —D. W. Keliiokamoku

Waianae—S. W. Kailieha

Waialua—Bejamin Naukana

Waimanalo—J. Kimo

Kauai.

Hanalei—Charles Kahee

Kilauea—George W. Mahikoa

Hanapepe—D. W. Kamaliikane

Waimea—J. A. Akina

Wainiha—S. K. Kaleikini

Waioli—J. Molokai

Joseph Nawahi,

President.

J. K. Kaulia

Secretary.

[See also mention of a picture taken of the committee that took the Memoriala to Blount from an earlier post here.]

¹Taken from p. 504 of the Blount Report.

(Leo o ka Lahui, 5/3/1893, p. 2)

MEMORIALA A KA Lahui Hawaii.

Ka Leo o ka Lahui, Buke II, Helu 697, Aoao 2. Mei 3, 1893.

Hilo train, 1879.

Riding Steam Engine Train in Hilo.

Star Mill, Waiakea, Hilo, H.,
July 11, 1879, 1½ P. M.

Hon. Joseph U. Kawainui,

Aloha oe,—

Here I am now aboard the standing Locomotive, and I am writing what I see. Everything is going according to plans. The Locomotive is running with a single freight car attached, to test it out, for 840 feet in distance, and the tracks are still being laid.

Should you want to ride first on the train, come quickly. With delight,

Joseph Nawahi.

P. S. The steampower is 100 lbs, and its speed is between 18 and 20 miles per hour. J. N. Continue reading

Nawahi paints Hilo Town, 1868.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO.”—”Oahu.”]

Painting of the Hilo Town.—We saw the beautiful painting of the town of Hilo of the Kanilehua rain, in the drug store of G. P. Judd [G. P. Kauka] here in Honolulu. The painting was painted by a Hawaiian boy, named Joseph K. Nawahi [Iosepa K. Nawahi], and he used his brush with detail in all the intricacies the painting. When you see it, it is so beautiful, and admiration for that Hawaiian painter wells in the hearts of all who sees it. This youth was not intensely educated in great art schools, but while he attended Lahainaluna Seminary, he was trained in that skill, drawing and painting, and his expertise in that exceptional discipline of the haole is clear for the first time. His name will become famous through his paintings.

[We all have heard about the awesome story of the 1888 painting by Nawahi of Hilo Town which was featured on Antique Roadshow, now displayed up on the campus of Kamehameha Schools, but the painting described here seems to be the one in the care of the Mission Houses Museum!

Check out this story about two more Nawahi paintings. The whereabouts of these two painting are not known (at least publicly) today… I really want to see the one with the Hiiaka sisters!]

(Kuokoa, 10/31/1868, p. 3)

Ke Kii o ke Kulanakauhale o Hilo.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 44, Aoao 3. Okatoba 31, 1868.

Another Nawahi painting! 1877.

[Found under: “Na Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

The artist Joseph Nawahi was commissioned to accompany the Editor of the Kuokoa to paint the Lava at the seaside of Keei, and to send it to the Bookstore of Whitney.

[With the two paintings mentioned in the previous post, this makes at least three on the subject of lava done by Nawahi in 1877: one in Hilo, one at the volcano, and the last at Keei. None of them are known today! Anyone have any ideas?]

(Kuokoa, 3/10/1877, p. 2)

Ua kauohaia ke kaha kii...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XVI, Helu 10, Aoao 2. Maraki 10, 1877.

Two paintings by Joseph Nawahi, 1877.

[Found under: “NA ANOAI.”]

When it was made known that Lava was erupting once again, along with it came the painting done by our good friend, the Hon. J. Nawahi; seen is the fiery red from Hilo, lighting up the walls of the heavens; and that painting can be seen in Whitney’s [bookstore] window. But this past Thursday, our famous seer artist did a painting of the fires of that woman of the pit, with the many Hiiaka aumakua igniting that fiery hot imu. Perhaps this is what some of our readers are saying; “the lava has reignited because of the aumakua;” that is ignorant. See this painting right outside of the printing office of the Pacific Commercial Advertiser [Kalepa].

[After that Antique Roadshow episode in 2007, nearly everyone knows about that painting of Hilo done by Joseph Nawahi now hanging up at Kamehameha Schools. I believe that these two however are not known today. Anyone have any ideas?]

(Lahui Hawaii, 2/22/1877, p. 3)

I ka wa i hoike ia mai ai...

Ka Lahui Hawaii, Buke III, Helu 8, Aoao 3. Feberuari 22, 1877.