Anybody ever see one of these blue ribbons or blue badges of the annexationists? 1893.

[Found under: “TOPICS OF THE DAY.”]

The appointment of Mr. Kauhi to be Sheriff for the District of Ewa is very characteristic of the Provisional Government. Because Mr. Kauhi has sported a blue annexation badge he has been considered fit by the Attorney General to hold the responsible position to which he has been appointed. The blue badge has evidently made Mr. Smith forget that the honest(!) and super—virtuous Legislature of 1888 expelled Mr. Kauhi who was the member from Ewa for being convicted of being a bribe taker—but perhaps bribe-taking is not considered a sin among the P. G. rulers and not considered a bad quality for a police officer. We now fully expect to see Mr. W. O. Smith pitchfork that other honest (?) Hawaiian Mr. J. W. Kalua into office—say as judge for Wailuku. “Birds of a feather flock together” seems to be a true proverb as far as our missionary government is concerned.

[In the article, “BLOUNT AT HAWAII” printed on the front page of the Chicago Daily Tribune on 4/6/1893, mentioned is a dark-blue ribbon with the words ANNEXATION CLUB being worn by the members of said club to present themselves to James Blount.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/10/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 8, Page 2. January 10, 1893.

Royalists and Annexationists and libel, 1893.

CAME TO BLOWS.

Annexationists and Royalists Have a Little Set-to.

There was a small-sized row between six Annexationists and twenty Royalists in the Merchants’ Exchange saloon Saturday night. Norrie, a Royalist hanger-on of the Holomua, got the contents of a spitoon, while Ned Thomas, the “anatomist,” got a beer mug along side the head.

(Hawaiian Star, 5/29/1893, p. 5)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 54, Page 5. May 29, 1893.

On annexationists, 1893.

THE FRUITS OF ANNEXATION.

The other day, Dr. McGrew, Editor of the newspaper, the Star, of this town, was sued over some filthy words printed about Mr. Norrie, calling him a spittoon carrier [?? lawe ipukuha].* Mr. Norrie is a gentleman in our view; but that is nothing to the “Great Father of Annexation,” for he denounces Mr. Norrie as someone to be treated with contempt and tormented.

Because of that publication by Dr. McGrew which sullied his good name, he was hurt, and that is the reason for the suit, for his name is important to him.

This past Wednesday, the doctor was tried, and the judgement remains; we know that there can be no other judgement than that he is guilty.

This Thursday morning, when the steamliner of T. H. Davis and Company came up to the wharf of Porter Company.

A Hawaiian man named Puaala was climbing up wearing the blue ribbon of the annexationists [libine bolu hoohui aina] on his chest; when the captain saw this Hawaiian climbing aboard the ship, two of them stood at the top of the stairway, while the other people climbed aboard. Continue reading

John L. Stevens represents Hawaii in America, 1893.

STEVENS AND HAWAII.

The Ex-Minister Points Out the Advantage of Annexation.

AMERICAN INTEREST LEAD

An Address Before San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, Which Passes Resolution Favoring Annexation.

San Francisco, June 1.—Hon. John L. Stevens, ex-United States minister at Hawaii, addressed the Chamber of Commerce of this city to-day on the subject of “Hawaiian Affairs and Their Relation to the Interest of the United States.” A large number of businessmen were present and gave the speaker an appreciative reception. At the close of the address a resolution was adopted favoring the speedy annexation of the islands. Mr. Stevens, in relating his first impressions upon the islands, said he had not been long in Honolulu before he perceived how thoroughly an American city it was and how predominating were all American interests on the islands. Continuing he said:

He had found an intelligent body of citizens of American and European origin supporting a semi-barbaric monarchy, dead in everything but its vices; coarsely luxuriant in its tastes and wishes and spreading social and political demoralization througout the island.

The speaker then related several incidents in the career of the deposed queen, and charges her not only with personal immorality, but also with having by unconstitutional and arbitrary methods, secured the adoption of certain measures, such as the opium and lottery bills, and recited her attempt to promulgate a new constitution, which finally aroused the respectable element of the community to action. Mr. Stevens then reviewed in detail the circumstances of the revolution and overthrow of the queen last January, and the subsequent establishment of the provisional government. He spoke of the danger of riot and incendiarism at the time of the revolution, the fact that there was no adequate police power in Honolulu, and that an appeal was accordingly made for the landing of men from the United States ship Boston. In this connection, Mr. Stevens said in part:

Under the diplomatic and naval rules, the United States minister and naval commander would have shamefully ignored their duty had they not landed men from the Boston for the security of American life and property and the maintenance of public order, even had the committee of public safety not requested the United States to do so. The Boston’s men stepped not an inch from the line of duty; they never lifted a finger in aid of the fallen monarchy on the rising of the provisional government and all assertions to the contrary, by whomsoever uttered, are audacious falsehoods.

Continue reading

Be vigilant. Just because someone claims to represent you, does that necessarily mean it is so? 1893 / timeless.

HOW IS IT POSSIBLE?

Yes, how can Stevens [John L. Stevens] make himself so brazen and say that his appearance, his voice, and his words—that they represent the Hawaiian people, all the while that that Stevens is in the United States? This is something that is appalling to us, but there are many things that will shock someone, and at times we just want to suppress that feeling, but we cannot, because of how blatant the examples. However, while we may be in shock, the shock of Thurston and his group will greatly surpass this, when they realize that they  met up with the spirit of the waters of Eleile that turn back ti leaves,* and they will realize that the sentiment of the Americans will turn back as well when they hear the truth.

[Many times people don’t pay attention to what is happening outside their own community because they have a job to do, or they have children to care for, or this, or that. Let us be vigilant during these upcoming years. The future generations deserve our attention.]

* See Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Saying, #1649 about the current in the pool of Eleile which turns back stalks of ti leaves thrown into it by visitors.

(Hawaii Holomua, 2/15/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke III, Helu 160, Aoao 2. Feberuari 15, 1893.

Islands of Hawaii nei, 1897.

The Hawaiian Archipelago.

Outside of the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu, Kauai, Lanai, Molokai, Kahoolawe, Niihau, Lehua and Kaula, that we are used to seeing as a part of what in Hawaiian is called “Ko Hawaii Pae Aina,” [The Hawaiian Archipelago], there are other islands included in that group.

The island of Nihoa (Bird Island) became part of Hawaii nei in 1822. This “annexation” [“hoohui aina”] was carried out by Kuhina Kaahumanu. “Keolaloa” (Capt. William Sumner) was the captain of the ship sent to carryout this task.

The island of Laysan became a Hawaiian territory [kalana aina Hawaii] on the 1st of May, 1857, and on the 10th in that same year, the island of Lisianski was joined into the Nation of Kamehameha by Captain Keoni Peti (John Paty). Continue reading

“The Hawaiian Revolution!” 1894.

THE HAWAIIAN REVOLUTION!

DEDICATED BY SPECIAL PERMISSION

TO THE

Provisional Government

A MOST ELABORATE AND EXTENSIVE HISTORY OF
HAWAII FROM JANUARY, 1893, UNTIL
THE PRESENT!

EXQUISITELY ILLUSTRATED BY THE NEW AND

Beautiful “Crisp Photo” Process.

HAWAII.

The Volume Will Contain Half Tone Portraits of All the Leading People Connected With This Memorable Epoch.

Including an Account of the

INDUSTRIAL ÷  ADVANCE ÷ OF ÷ HONOLULU

In Fact an Historical, Statistical and Descriptive Review of the Material Development and Advancement of the Islands.

WITH AN APENDIX CONTAINING A SERIES OF

Comprehensive ÷ Sketches ÷ of ÷ Representative ÷ Citizens

Mr. Wellesley A. Parker, whose success throughout the world in art matters, is well known has been specially employed to superintend the pictorial department of this work. Of the Crisp process, which is to be used, the following extract from a well known paper speaks well for it.

The Albany, N. Y. Evening Journal says:

New Printing Process.—People unacquainted with the wonderful strides that have been made in Australia in printing, and the general depicting of nature in its most beautiful moods, have little idea of the complimentary and deserving success that Messrs. F. W. Niven and Co. of Ballarat, Australia have attained in their new “Crisp Photo” Process. We have been shown by Mr. Wellesley Parker, who is visiting us, samples of this new firm’s beautiful process. The book that has lately run into three editions, of 5000 each, of “Syracuse Illustrated” is beyond compare the most exquisite series of views ever appearing in the direction of printing. Episodes of the old days, and scenes of the beauties of the gardens of the city, are scattered throughout, interented with pictures of well-known citizens, that for fidelity rival any photograph that is at present produced. Every credit is due to Australia, who has taken the lead in this innovation.

Intersperced through the book will be pages devoted to the estaousnments or leading wholesale and retail merchants. Not only will the exteriors of the buildings be shown, but the interiors will come out with great fidelity, showing every branch of the business in actual working order, thus giving to many a glimpse behind the scenes of the various details involved in producing the articles that they purchase in the showroom or at the counter. The first issue of “The Hawaiian Revolution” is to be 5000.

The principal industries and business establishments will be visited by Mr. Parker, who is now in this city, on behalf of the Publishers, and arrangements made by which the actual details of the various branches of the businesses will be represented pictorially. In addition, it is the desire of the Publishers to add to the completeness of the work by prevailing upon citizens who have handsome residences or grounds, to arrange with Mr. Parker for their appearance in its pages.

PUBLISHED BY THE

HAWAIIAN GAZETTE CO.

[Does anyone know if this book ever got published?]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 4/25/1894, p. 3)

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The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XIX, Number 3671, Page 3. April 25, 1894.