What will happen to the people suffering from leprosy? 1893.

PERTAINING TO THE MA’I LEPERA.

What will become of the friends who are suffering from being dealt with that hand of grief and sadness from here on. We are now under a new government and new Board of Health [Papa Ola], but their Commissioners are in Washington where they are trying to annex us with America, and if we are indeed annexed, what will happen to our friends who are afflicted with this sickness? That nation is very frightened and hateful of those who have the disease, and what in the world will be the outcome?

(Hawaii Holomua, 3/11/1893, p. 3)

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Mrs. Kala composes mele for John E. Bush, 1893.

HE WEHI NO LE’AKAHELE.

He wehi keia no Le’akahele
Kahi’apaiole o ka Makakila
He Elele hopo ole na ka Lahui
He imi kaulike no Hawaii
Na Le’akahele i hue pau aku
Ma ke Telegarapa lawe olelo
Hoike ana hoi me ka wiwo ole
No Hawaii moku kele i ke kai Continue reading

Anti-Annexation sentiment from the United States, 1897.

WHY WE DO NOT WANT HAWAII.

  1. Because the Hawaiians do not wish annexation, as the anti-annexation petition of 21,000 names—seven times the voters under the constitution of the “republic”—proves beyond question.
  2. Because annexation means a leprous Asiatic and Kanaka population for a new State, with two Senators in our Congress.
  3. Because the islands are five days and five nights’ steaming from our coast.
  4. Because to fortify them would cost upward of $200,000,000, and to provide a navy to defend them at least $200,000,000 more.
  5. Because we control them now and have a coaling station there which can be fortified at a fraction of the cost of fortifying all of the populated islands.
  6. Because their commerce is small and incapable of great expansion, and their climate assures the continuance of the domination of the brown races forever.
  7. Because they would be a burden and expense in time of peace and a danger in time of war.

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Let’s move forward, and not backward. 1897.

[Found under: “KE ALEALE NEI KA WAI.”]

All the while the circle of annexationists are reviling the Asians, they majority of them are employing those people as servants. How are you being deceived of the truth of their desires, O United States of America? What hypocrites!

(Makaainana, 2/8/1897, p. 4)

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Ka Makaainana, Buke VII—-Ano Hou, Helu 6, Aoao 4. Feberuari 8, 1897.

Pressured by their teachers, 1893.

THE SCHOOLS OF SAINT LOUIS AND KAMEHAMEHA.

We were told that the students of Saint Louis School [ke Kula o Sana Lui] were prohibited from placing the ribbon of the annexationists upon their chests. And we were also informed that the students of Kamehameha

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Anybody ever see one of these blue ribbons or blue badges of the annexationists? 1893.

[Found under: “TOPICS OF THE DAY.”]

The appointment of Mr. Kauhi to be Sheriff for the District of Ewa is very characteristic of the Provisional Government. Because Mr. Kauhi has sported a blue annexation badge he has been considered fit by the Attorney General to hold the responsible position to which he has been appointed. The blue badge has evidently made Mr. Smith forget that the honest(!) and super—virtuous Legislature of 1888 expelled Mr. Kauhi who was the member from Ewa for being convicted of being a bribe taker—but perhaps bribe-taking is not considered a sin among the P. G. rulers and not considered a bad quality for a police officer. We now fully expect to see Mr. W. O. Smith pitchfork that other honest (?) Hawaiian Mr. J. W. Kalua into office—say as judge for Wailuku. “Birds of a feather flock together” seems to be a true proverb as far as our missionary government is concerned.

[In the article, “BLOUNT AT HAWAII” printed on the front page of the Chicago Daily Tribune on 4/6/1893, mentioned is a dark-blue ribbon with the words ANNEXATION CLUB being worn by the members of said club to present themselves to James Blount.]

(Hawaii Holomua, 1/10/1893, p. 2)

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Hawaii Holomua, Volume II, Number 8, Page 2. January 10, 1893.

Royalists and Annexationists and libel, 1893.

CAME TO BLOWS.

Annexationists and Royalists Have a Little Set-to.

There was a small-sized row between six Annexationists and twenty Royalists in the Merchants’ Exchange saloon Saturday night. Norrie, a Royalist hanger-on of the Holomua, got the contents of a spitoon, while Ned Thomas, the “anatomist,” got a beer mug along side the head.

(Hawaiian Star, 5/29/1893, p. 5)

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The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 54, Page 5. May 29, 1893.