Restoration Day celebration, day number 4! 1844.

On Saturday, Aug. 3—Gov. Kekuanaoa gave a rural feast at the village of Waikiki, to his Majesty and court. A rustic arbor, with flags over head, was prepared under the beautiful grove of Ko [Kou] trees. The table was 100 feet long, well laid out, and accommodated 81 guests. The feast was cooked altogether in the Hawaiian style, and consisted of 17 different dishes, some of which were excellent.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

On Saturday...

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1.—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

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Restoration Day celebration, day number 3! 1844.

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., the guests re-assembled at Mauna Kilika, and formed in nearly the same order of procession as the day before; being this day joined by the ladies of His Majesty’s naturalized subjects—Executive officers—to whom places were courteously assigned, immediately succeeding their Majesties. On this day, no order prescribed the dresses of the ladies, and they consulted their own fanices. The display was rich, and, in contrast with the uniforms of the soldiery, pleasing and highly creditable to their tastes. The entertainment went off with great spirit, and the utmost good humor prevailed. After the regular toasts to their Majesties, the King and Queen, to the Premier, and high officers of State, were given, others rapidly followed, succeeded by short and pithy addresses, which occasioned great applause. On this occasion, the Hon. G. P. Judd, Governor Young, Mr. Ii, J. Ricord, Esq., and Mr. J. F. B. Marshall, spoke: the latter gentleman alluded, with great feeling, to the high commission with which he had been entrusted by His Majesty, the past year, and the respect with which the Envoys of His Majesty, had been received abroad; and concluded with the following sentiment:—

“A speedy return, and hearty welcome to Mess. Haalilio and Richards.”

The dinner was prolonged for several hours, and the house illuminated. In the evening, four veterans of the father of his present Majesty, were introduced, who having seated themselves before the King and Queen, and Premier, after the old Hawaiian custom, with their calabash drums between their legs, commenced a mele, accompanying their song with rapid, and very skillful, manipulations upon their drums, and gesticulations expressive of the sentiment of their song, which was commemorative of the deeds of his warrior father, and in praise of himself and the Premier. These men are almost the only ones remaining who understand the chanting of their ancient meles after this manner, and one of them, from nineteen years disuse, failed before the conclusion. Liholiho, in his reign, kept them constantly about his person, but the taste for their exercises, seems to have almost altogether declined, as but little interest was manifested, by the guests generally, in the performance. It was interesting, however, as a relic of the past, and from its analogy to a custom of the Celtic tribes of Europe, in their era of barbarism. The pleasures of the evening were not confined to the walls of the banqueting house; a numerous crowd was assembled outside, diverted by the music of the band.

At 8 o’clock, P. M. a salute was fired from Punch-bowl, with very grand effect [not legible because of fold in paper] cloud rested over the hill, and when the guns belched forth their thunder in quick succession, lighting up the hill by their flashes, and shaking the houses beneath with their heavy reverberations, it required no lively imagination to fancy that the old crater had awakened from its slumber of ages, and was about to pour a fiery flood upon the town beneath.

Soon after, the troops were re-formed, and His Majesty and the court proceeded to the house of the young chiefs, where the company were very agreeably entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, the teachers of the Royal children; and by the princes and princesses themselves, by their performances on the piano, and social music, both of which was highly creditable to themselves, and gratifying to their parents. The Royal party next proceeded to the mansion of the Hon. Secretary of State. The band assembled in front of the house, playing lively dancing tunes, while the officers of the troops formed themselves into groups and danced with great vigor and animation.

The effect by torch-light was peculiarly striking: all, at intervals waving their swords on high, and joined by the soldiers, giving utterance to deafening cheers, which were borne in the stillness of the night, far and wide.

After experiencing the hospitality of the lady of the Secretary of State, the procession re-formed and marched at quick step towards his Majesty’s residence. The cheering in their progress through the streets was loud and enthusiastic. At 10 o’clock the company took leave of their Majesties.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

Restoration Day celebration, day number 2! 1844.

SECOND DAY OF THE FESTIVAL, AUGUST 1ST.

Thursday morning, Aug. 1st, at 10 o’clock A. M.—a procession was formed of all the juvenile members of temperance societies to the number of one thousand eight hundred of all ages and both sexes. They were well dressed, and divided into companies bearing appropriate banners, marching in couples to the fort, where they were joined by Their Majesties, the King and Queen, Her Royal Highness the Premier, and the chief nobles and officers of the court and kingdom. Attended by the military, they marched to the stone church, which was crowded to excess, inside and out; doors, windows and every available space being occupied by the eager multitude; and a more pleasing sight than so many happy children, (with their gratified parents) zealous in the noble cause of temperance, and sustained both by the precept and example of the highest magnates of their country, was never witnessed at these Islands. The King and Premier both addressed the audience, and their remarks were received with fixed attention. It was remarked that his Majesty spoke with much spirit and feeling and with a very happy…

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 46)

SECOND DAY OF THE FESTIVAL, AUGUST 1ST.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1.—Number 12, Page 46. August 10, 1844.

…effect. Mr. Ii, of his Majesty’s Privy Council, then spoke, and commanded the attention of all present by his grace and eloquence. Mr. Ii is an orator by nature, and to native vigor of expression, adds the charm of polished and commanding action. We are sure, that none who understood the Hawaiian language, could fail of deriving great pleasure and profit from his remarks; and those who were unacquainted with it, scarcely less of the former from his peculiarly impressive manner. The address referred to the great and glorious change brought about by the adherence to the tee-total principle by the chiefs and people generally, and the striking contrast between the former periods of wild mis-rule and intemperance, and the bright days of order and prosperity that are now dawning upon the kingdom. All spoke with feeling, because it was a subject that came home to their hearts—bitter and sweet experience, both were theirs—the former, past—the latter, present. Dr. Winslow addressed the audience also, in some appropriate remarks and bestowed a high compliment upon the government and people, and also upon G. P. Judd, Esq., for the zeal and success with which he had labored in their cause. But want of space compells us to be brief. A temperance glee was sung by the young chiefs, accompanied by one of them on the piano, which afforded great satisfaction to their royal auditors. Rev. Mr. Armstrong asked the children if they were going to continue to keep the pledge. The thousands rose en masse, and made the lofty roof ring and ring again with their loud and enthusiastic “ae.” The whole exercises were of the most interesting nature, and we are happy to add, gave great pleasure to the strangers present. The procession then returned to the fort, and there dispersed.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., a procession was again formed at the Fort, to march to the Feast which was given to the subjects of His Majesty, in the same house as the day before. His Majesty’s household guards, in neat uniform—150 strong—headed the procession, commanded by Colonel Stephens; next came the band. Her Majesty, the Queen, supported by the King, and the Secretary of State. The Premier, attended by C. Kanaina and her pages, with kahilis. The Governess of Kauai, by Governor Young and Mr. Ii; the other female chiefs, according to their rank, attended by officers of the government, (on their right, the Royal standard bearers and guards: outside of them, and on both sides, His Majesty’s body guard) the governors, chiefs, and officers, generally, in full uniform, (the commanders of the soldiery, and the aids of Governor Kekuanaoa, on horseback,) and a long procession formed by those invited, (black being the costume of the ladies,) and escorted, on either side, by double files of soldiers, in white uniforms. The procession marched through the principal streets, which were crowded by the concourse of spectators, to Beretania, where the guests were seated at the feast, in nearly the same order as the day before. The first toast was

By Her Royal Highness, the Premier:—”His Hawaiian Majesty, Kamehameha III.”—”God save the King”, by the band;—21 guns, and [?????] cheers.

The second toast was

By the Secretary of State:—”Her Royal Highness, the Premier.” Music, and loud applause.

The third toast was

By the Attorney General:—”Her Majesty, Kalama, Queen of the Hawaiian Islands.” Music, and shouts of applause.

Great good humor prevailed, and toasts followed in quick succession.

His Majesty gave:—”The prospective King, Queen, Premier, and Rulers, of the Kingdom”,—which was received with loud cheers—three times three.

“The Hon. Secretary of State,”—”The Officers of the Government,”—”The absent Envoys, Messrs. Haalilio and Richards,”—and many other toasts, were drunk with great applause, and called forth several short, but spirited addresses.

“The Memory of ‘Kamehameha, the Great,'” standing, and in silence.

After remaining two hours at the table, His Majesty arose, the procession was reformed, and returned to the Fort, where the King was received with loud cheers by his subjects; after which the trops were dismissed, and the company dispersed.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

effect. Mr. Ii, of his Majesty's...

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

Multi-day Restoration Day celebration! 1844.

The 31st of July.

The Festivities of the 31st and the three following days—the Anniversary of the Restoration of the Hawaiian Flag by Admiral Thomas.

The morning of the 31st, was ushered in by a salute of 21 guns from the battery on Punch-bowl hill. At 10 o’clock, His Majesty, accompanied by the Queen, the Premier, the members of his Privy Council, the Governors of Oahu, Maui, and Kauai and the officers of his Government generally, under military escort, proceeded to the Stone Church [Kawaiahao Church], where the temperance festival was to be held. The church was tastefully decorated with evergreens, and numerous banners, bearing pictures and mottoes significant of the cause in which they were raised. The massive walls re-echoed the marshal strains of the band, as the Royal party proceeded up the aisles to a platform in front of the pulpit, on which seats had been arranged for the high dignitaries. The troops filed into the church and occupied the slips, and the people generally followed after, so that the church was filled to overflowing.—Rev. Mr. Bishop opened the meeting by a short address. His Majesty then rose, and gave a very spirited and pertinent speech, which was listened to with great attention. He was followed by her Royal Highness the Premier, and by the Hon. Secretary of State G. P. Judd, His Excellency, Gov. Kekuanaoa, and the Rev. Mr. Armstrong, with music in the intervals. The procession then returned to Mauna Kilika in the same order that it had left. The ships in the harbor displayed their flags in honor of the day: the U. S. Ship Warren wore the Hawaiian flag at her fore, and at noon her commander courteously fired a salute of 21 guns.

At 3 o’clock P. M., the large new house erected at Beretania for the occasion, was filled by the guests invited to the Royal feast. The house was prettily though simply decorated. Three tables, each prepared for 86 persons, ran nearly its whole length. At the upper end of the table of His Majesty, arranged transversely to the others. The coup d’œuil of the whole, with their bright array of glasses, was pleasing; and the effect was much more gratifying when the whole company was assembled. About 100 of the foreign residents, among whom was a very handsome representation of their ladies, and the officers of the U. S. Ship Warren were present. Of the Hawaiians, 200 were present; the ladies were dressed in white, the gentlemen in full dress and the officers in uniform. Shortly before 4 o’clock, their Majesties, the King and Queen, Her Royal Highness, the Premier, the members of the Privy Council, and the other high officers of the kingdom arrived, attended by the same military escort as in the morning. As soon as His Majesty was seated, the company took their seats according to the directions of the Master of Ceremonies for the occasion. On the right of His Majesty was the Premier and Mrs. G. P. Judd; on the left the Governess of Kauai. Opposite him sat the Queen, with Mr. Dudoit, Consul of France, and William Hooper, Esq. American Consul, on her right. On her left, were R. C. Wyllie, Esq., H. B. M.’s Pro-Consul, and Capt. Hull of the U. S. Ship Warren. The Hon. G. P. Judd occupied one end of the table, with the ladies of the American and French Consuls on either side of him; at the other end was H. M.’s Attorney General, J. Ricord, Esq., with the ladies of Gov. Young and William Paty, Esq. The other guests at his Majesty’s table, consisted of the High Chiefs, members of his Council, Executive Officers, J. F. B. Marshall and George Pelly, Esqs., representing the American and British residents. At the head of the middle table, was Gov. Kekuanaoa, the young chiefs being immediately next to him, and then the American Missionaries and their families, and the invited foreign guest.—The left hand table, at the head of which was A. Paki, was occupied by Hawaiian subjects; the one on the right hand—Gov. Young being at the head—by the Roman Catholic clergy, foreign guests and subjects indiscriminately.

The following regular toasts were given and drank standing.

1. By the Premier.—”His Majesty, Kamehameha III, King of the Hawaiian Islands.”—”God save the King,” by the band—and 21 guns from Punchbowl.

The three following, by the Hon. G. P. Judd—H. H. M.’s Secretary of State.

2. “His most Christian Majesty, Louis Philippe, King of the French.”—Music and 21 guns.

3. “Her most Gracious Majesty, Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland.”—”God save the Queen”—and 21 guns.

4. “The President of the United States.”—Hail Columbia—and 21 guns.

5. “Her Royal Highness, the Premier.”—Grand March.

6. By the Att’y. Gen.—”Her Majesty, Kalama,—Queen of the Hawaiian Islands.”

After which, Gov. Kekuanaoa proposed—”The Health of Admiral Thomas,”—which was enthusiastically received, and to which H. B. M.’s Pro-Consul, R. C. Wyllie, Esq.—in behalf of the gallant admiral, replied as nearly as we can remember, in the following terms:—

“In the absence of the British Consul General, and of any one else to speak for Admiral Thomas, it may not be out of place for me to state, that i will be pleasing to him, to know that he has not been forgotten on this occasion. I will take care to communicate to him that he has not been forgotten.

The Act of Restoration, commemorated on this day, will associate his name indellibly with the history of this young nation, in which, I can assure you, the Admiral takes the most lively interest.

It was a source of great gratification to him, after performing that act, to find that he had judged correctly of the just and liberal views of H. B. M.’s Government towards these Islands.

And I may add, that her Majesty, the Queen of England, and her government, only desire the prosperity and happiness of the Hawaiian people under the dynasty of King Kamehameha III., and his successors to the crown.”

His Majesty left the tables between six and seven, and the company then broke up.—This feast and the succeeding ones were conducted entirely on temperance principles, no wines of any kind being used.—Much credit is due to F. W. Thompson, our worthy host of the Mansion House, who provided the dinners—for the punctuality, and good order, observed in all the arrangements, and we may add, for the merit of the cookery likewise.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 46.)

The 31st of July.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1, Number 12, Page 46. August 10, 1844.

More on Restoration Day, 1843.

“THE VICTORY OF WRONGDOERS IS BUT FOR A MOMENT.”

Who does not know the truth of this statement? He must read the Bible; it is there that he will see the truth in this statement. What of Pharaoh [Parao], the ruler of Egypt [Aigupita], the one who overburdened and oppressed the Israelites? Did he not die at once, along with all of his warriors in the Red Sea? And with his quick death in the Red Sea, what happened to Moses and his people? Did they not sing, exalt, rejoice, and praise God for his saving them from the hands of their enemy? Read Exodus [Pukaana] chapter 14 and chapter 15, and there it will be clarified.

[Considering this particular outcome, this was quite a boost for Christianity.]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 27)

"O KA LANAKILA O KA POE HEWA, HE POKOLE IA."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 27. Augate 8, 1843.

Richard Thomas arrives today, 1843.

WARSHIP.

On the 26th of July, the British Warship named Dublin arrived. Read Admiral Thomas is the Captain. He is the commander-in-chief of the British Warships here in the Pacific Ocean.

When he received the document about Capt. Lord George Paulet, by way of the ship Victoria, and he heard clearly that the flag of Britain was raised at this archipelago, he quickly came to restore the kingdom to Kamehameha III. How wonderful indeed is his aloha for the king! and for the people as well.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

Remember Restoration Day! 1896.

It would not be wrong of us to commemorate our La Hoihoi Ea, that being this coming Friday, the 53rd year from when George Paulet [Lo Keoki] trespassed upon Hawaii nei on February 25, 1843, and we were blessed once more by Admiral Thomas on that day the very same year. If we do indeed celebrate it, we should do it with decorum and peace.

(Makaainana, 7/27/1896, p. 4)

E hewa ole no ia kakou...

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI—-Ano Hou, Helu 4, Aoao 4. Iulai 27, 1896.