Memorial tablets in honor of John Papa Ii, Timoteo Haalilio, Levi Haalelea, and Ululani Haalelea, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

Dedicatory Services at Old Church Yesterday Morning.

Old Kawaiahao church yesterday morning was crowded for the dedication of memorial tablets in honor of John Ii, Haalilio, Haalelea and Ululani, one tablet bearing the name of Ii and the other the three latter names. Old days were recalled as eloquent speakers spoke of the good works of the aliis who have passed away and in whose honor marble tablets have been inscribed.

The Rev. S. L. Desha officiated at the dedication of the Ioane Ii tablet and also spoke concerning Timoteo Haalilio, while the Hon. E. K. Lilikalani delivered the dedicatory as far as it concerned the memory of Levi and Ululani Haalelea.

The Rev. H. H. Parker was present and introduced the speakers with appropriate remarks.

The Rev. S. L. Desha referred to Ii as one of the high chieffs of the islands who had enjoyed the confidence of royalty, who was a member of Kawaiahao church when Bingham was pastor. He was a member of the Supreme Court and a member of the land commission under Kamehameha III and Kamehameha IV. Not was he only powerful for good in the work of the church, but he had always been noted as a man of great physical strength. One day a young prince had been thrown by an ill-tempered horse and Ii, to revenge royalty, killed the animal with one blow of his fist.

Speaking of Haalilio, Desha stated that this alii was born in Koolau, this island, of most distinguished parents, his mother having been Governor of Molokai. When he was eight years of age his father died and King Kamehameha III took him to court and when Mr. and Mrs. Cooke built the school for the royal princes, Haalilio went there to be educated. He graduated with honors, becoming a particularly good speaker of English.

Hon. Lilikalani, indicating the tablet upon which were the names of Haalelea and his wife, declared that it belonged to no one person, but to all the church for each and all had contributed to the expense.

Ululani was born, said Lilikalani, in…

(Continued on Page Four.)

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 1)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 1. October 14, 1907.

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

(Continued from Page One.)

Hilo, July 22, 1842, and at the age of 16, in 1858, married Haalelea, related to the queen of Kamehameha III and to King Lunalilo. The husband died in 1864. There was no issue. In that year H. H. Parker came to Honolulu from Lahainaluna where he had been a teacher, to take the pastorate of Kawaiahao church. Then Mrs. Haalelea joined the church and for 40 years was an active and beloved member of the congregation. She was noted for her humble bearing and good Christian works. She was active among benefit societies for the Hawaiians and others and was a vice president of the Hui Hoola Lahui and an honorary member of the board of trustees of the Kapiolani Maternity Home. She was also one of the presidents of the Hui No Ea. In 1893 it was decided that the Kawaiahao church was a dangerous place to enter on account of the rottenness of the roof and other timbers. They were troublous times then, the dethronement of Liliuokalani being the tais and one man’s hand turned against another, said Lilikalani, and it was not thought that any money could be raised for repairs, but Mrs. Haalelea got up a church fair that realized $2000 and this money was the beginning of a fund that finally, with the help of prominent and generous Honolulu people, resulted in the repair of the sacred edifice. On this account Lilikalani referred to Mrs. Haalelea as the second founder of Kawaiahao.

[Check out this article on the same topic found in one of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers, written by E. K. Lilikalani himself!]

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 10/14/1907, p. 4)

TABLETS TO ALII KAWAIAHAOANS

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLVI, Number 7857, Page 4. October 14, 1907.

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Restoration Day celebration, day number 3! 1844.

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., the guests re-assembled at Mauna Kilika, and formed in nearly the same order of procession as the day before; being this day joined by the ladies of His Majesty’s naturalized subjects—Executive officers—to whom places were courteously assigned, immediately succeeding their Majesties. On this day, no order prescribed the dresses of the ladies, and they consulted their own fanices. The display was rich, and, in contrast with the uniforms of the soldiery, pleasing and highly creditable to their tastes. The entertainment went off with great spirit, and the utmost good humor prevailed. After the regular toasts to their Majesties, the King and Queen, to the Premier, and high officers of State, were given, others rapidly followed, succeeded by short and pithy addresses, which occasioned great applause. On this occasion, the Hon. G. P. Judd, Governor Young, Mr. Ii, J. Ricord, Esq., and Mr. J. F. B. Marshall, spoke: the latter gentleman alluded, with great feeling, to the high commission with which he had been entrusted by His Majesty, the past year, and the respect with which the Envoys of His Majesty, had been received abroad; and concluded with the following sentiment:—

“A speedy return, and hearty welcome to Mess. Haalilio and Richards.”

The dinner was prolonged for several hours, and the house illuminated. In the evening, four veterans of the father of his present Majesty, were introduced, who having seated themselves before the King and Queen, and Premier, after the old Hawaiian custom, with their calabash drums between their legs, commenced a mele, accompanying their song with rapid, and very skillful, manipulations upon their drums, and gesticulations expressive of the sentiment of their song, which was commemorative of the deeds of his warrior father, and in praise of himself and the Premier. These men are almost the only ones remaining who understand the chanting of their ancient meles after this manner, and one of them, from nineteen years disuse, failed before the conclusion. Liholiho, in his reign, kept them constantly about his person, but the taste for their exercises, seems to have almost altogether declined, as but little interest was manifested, by the guests generally, in the performance. It was interesting, however, as a relic of the past, and from its analogy to a custom of the Celtic tribes of Europe, in their era of barbarism. The pleasures of the evening were not confined to the walls of the banqueting house; a numerous crowd was assembled outside, diverted by the music of the band.

At 8 o’clock, P. M. a salute was fired from Punch-bowl, with very grand effect [not legible because of fold in paper] cloud rested over the hill, and when the guns belched forth their thunder in quick succession, lighting up the hill by their flashes, and shaking the houses beneath with their heavy reverberations, it required no lively imagination to fancy that the old crater had awakened from its slumber of ages, and was about to pour a fiery flood upon the town beneath.

Soon after, the troops were re-formed, and His Majesty and the court proceeded to the house of the young chiefs, where the company were very agreeably entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, the teachers of the Royal children; and by the princes and princesses themselves, by their performances on the piano, and social music, both of which was highly creditable to themselves, and gratifying to their parents. The Royal party next proceeded to the mansion of the Hon. Secretary of State. The band assembled in front of the house, playing lively dancing tunes, while the officers of the troops formed themselves into groups and danced with great vigor and animation.

The effect by torch-light was peculiarly striking: all, at intervals waving their swords on high, and joined by the soldiers, giving utterance to deafening cheers, which were borne in the stillness of the night, far and wide.

After experiencing the hospitality of the lady of the Secretary of State, the procession re-formed and marched at quick step towards his Majesty’s residence. The cheering in their progress through the streets was loud and enthusiastic. At 10 o’clock the company took leave of their Majesties.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

Schools in Hawaii nei, 1844.

[Found under: “KA AHAOLELO MISIONARI.”]

II. The Schools. Lahainaluna College: there were 135 students enrolled in the school just recently. Six of them are studying the apostles of God with Dibela [Dibble]. In April, 30 students graduated, four died, three went home because of illness, and three were expelled for rule violations; that leaves 97 remaining at the school.

They are being taught by three teachers, Dibble, Emesona [Emerson], and Alekanedero [Alexander], in penmanship, in music, math, geography, algebra, surveying, theology, philosophy, composition, and speech. Some study in English, others study in the word of God.

College at Wailuku. The teachers at the school are Bele me kana wahine [Mr. and Mrs. Bailey] and Mi. Okana [Miss Ogden]; there are 47 students living there and eight are married. At the school is taught reading, penmanship, geography, math, philosophy, theology, spirituality and actual work.

Boarding School at Hilo. Laimana laua me kana wahine [Lyman and his wife] are the teachers. There are sixty students at the school; 37 of them have become members in the church. The instruction is like that of the Colleges at Wailuku and Lahainaluna; however they are not progressing far in the difficult subjects like at Lahainaluna.

Girls’ School at Hilo. Koanawahine [Mrs. Coan] is the teacher; most of the food is donated by the church members in Hilo. There are 26 students; there of them are married to husbands, 21 of them have joined the church.

Boarding School of the Alii. Kuke laua me kana wahine [Cooke and his wife] are the teachers. They are instructed only in the English language. The government sponsors this school, and supplies all necessities. It is doing well currently: the students are obedient and are progressing in their knowledge.

Missionary School at Punahou. Dola [Dole] and Kamika wahine [Mrs. Smith] and Rise laua me kana wahine [Rice and wife] are the teachers. There are 24 students at the school. This school is solely for the American missionaries.

Select Schools. There is one in Waioli under Ioane [Johnson]. There are 63 students. It is not a boarding school. The students put effort into working, and it is from this that they get their supplies, and the church members give assistance as well.

In Hilo is another select school. There are 70 students, and Wilikoke [Wilcox] is the teacher. But he might have gone to Waialua to live.

In Kohala is another. Bona [Bond] is the teacher; there are 12 students; there is schooling for teachers there also.

There is a select school at Hana. Rice was the teacher, but he has returned to Punahou now. There were recently 30 students.

Small Schools. In these Islands there are 330 schools; 270 teachers; 12,762 students; 4,000 children can read, 2,100 can write; 5,800 can do math; 1,850 know geography.

[The state of the schools in Hawaii nei was part of what was discussed at a missionary conference held in 1844. This description starts with “II.” because i left the first part of the discussion out which was “I. Pertaining to the Church“.
It would be very helpful if there was online a “comprehensive” list of all variant names for people, like these for many of the missionaries which was published in the Elele Hawaii in 1848.]

(Nonanona, 7/9/1844, pp. 35–36.)

II. Na Kula.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 35. Iulai 9, 1844.

Ma Hilo...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 4, Pepa 6, Aoao 36. Iulai 9, 1844.

The beginnings of Punahou School, 1841.

SCHOOLHOUSE FOR THE MISSIONARIES, AT KA PUNAHOU.

The rooms are explained by the numbers,

1, a library; 2, 3, 4, 5, for the teachers; 6, kitchen; 7, 8, 9, 10, for the students; 11, 12, for Mi. Mika [?] the woman helper; 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, for the students; 18, cafeteria; 19, school room; 20, room for entertaining guests; 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 for the students. A, E, wide areas to play.

This will not be completed quickly at this time; the places with solid lines are being constructed, and the areas surrounded by dashes are left to complete at a later date. The most tiny rooms are solitary rooms.

[Earlier, i posted a diagram of the layout of the Chiefs’ Children’s School. Here from about the same time is the school for missionary children at Kapunahou, the precursor to today’s Punahou School.

The school began instruction on July 11, 1842, with 5 boarders and 12 day schoolers.]

(Nonanona, 11/23/1841, p. 44)

KA HALE KULA NO NA MISIONARI, AIA MA KA PUNAHOU.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 11, Aoao 44. Novemaba 23, 1841.

One more on the passing of Jane Loeau, 1873.

The Death of Jane Loeau.

On Wednesday, July 30, Mrs. Jane Loeau Kaelemakule died, at Puunui, in this town. She died quickly; she had a pain in her chest after bathing in water; this is the ailment she died of, while still strong in body. She was born in Waimea, Kauai, in the year 1828, therefore she was 45 years old when she died. Her rank and ancestry is very famous in the history of succession of alii of Hawaii nei. Her father was Kalaniulumoku, and Liliha was her mother. On her mother’s side, it can be said that she was a great-granddaughter [moopuna kualua] of Kamehameha I. Here is clarification: Kamehameha lived with Kualii (f) and bore Loeau (the first) (f). Koakanu lived with Loeau (the first) and bore Liliha, the mother of Jane Loeau. During her childhood, she was educated under the teaching of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, and she was a schoolmate of the past two Monarchs who passed away as well as our present King, and also the royal descendants living today. Her passing may not be something that will greatly mourned by the people, as that blossom was plucked from the generation of alii; however, it is the moolelo of her ancestry that will show us these features [? na ka moolelo o kona hanauna e hoike mai ia kakou i na hiohiona i like pela]. Being that:

“Ua hala ka pili ka owa o Hakalau,
Hala ke kaha, ke ohi kumano ia mano,
I Kaumakaamano i ke kapu ka ai,
I ka ouli maka o Hanaimalama,
Ke ohi la i ka liko lau o ke Pahili,
I Hili mo—e, i Hili pawa, o Hele—i—pa—wa,
Mea e ka hele a hoi mai e,
E waiho ia hoi ka hele a kipakuia—a.

(Ko Hawaii Ponoi, 8/6/1873, p. 2)

Ka make ana o Jane Loeau.

Ko Hawaii Ponoi, Buke I, Helu 8, Aoao 2. Augate 6, 1873.

More on Jane Loeau’s passing, 1873.

Death of a Chiefess.—Jane Loeau, a descendant in the female line of the ancient chiefs of Kauai, and a reputed granddaughter of Kamehameha I., died suddenly in this city on Wednesday last. She was 45 years of age, and was in childhood an inmate of the Chief’s school under the charge of Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, at the same time with Kamehameha IVth and Vth and His present Majesty.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 8/2/1873, p. 3)

Death of a Chiefess.

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVIII, Number 5, Page 3. August 2, 1873.

Chiefs’ Children’s School, 1841.

Chiefs' Children's School Diagram

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 2, Aoao 5. Iulai 20, 1841.

THE CHIEFS’ CHILDREN’S SCHOOL.

This is the schoolhouse for the children of the alii, in Honolulu, Oahu, upland of the stone house of Kekauluohi. This schoolhouse was built by the alii in the year of our Lord 1839. They are the ones who paid for the costs, not the missionaries. The costs were perhaps two thousand dollars, and the cost was well worth this fine building. The alii paid out the money and the missionaries hired the haole and Hawaiians who did the labor. Above, you will see what this building is like. The length is the same as the width. It is 76 feet long, and so is its width. It is made with adobe, and its walls are about ten feet tall, and its thickness is two feet. The partitions are made of adobe as well and are one foot thick. The thatching of this building is actual pili grass. Look at the illustration above, the entrance is made clear, as are the other doors, and the…

(Nonanona, 7/20/1841, p. 5)

KA HALE KULA ALII.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 2, Aoao 5. Iulai 20, 1841.

…windows; clear also are the rooms for the teachers and the students.

There is an open space in the middle of the building; it is six feet wide and so too is the length; there is a water pump within it. Maniania [Manienie] grass grows there, so it is a nice place to play as well as to sit. There is a small lanai and a stone wall surrounding this wide area, which is a place to go when it is raining or when the sun is hot. The outside of the entire building is covered with mortar [poho]. Poho is not great; it will just fall off, and it soon loses its integrity. The inside of the building is covered with plaster [puna], and it is very good and sturdy; the children cannot make the plaster fall easily. The rooms are plastered all around and on top, and there is a fine floor below.

The building is appropriate for what we are using it for.

There are perhaps many who have heard of this schoolhouse but who have not seen it. Therefore, the instructors thought to put a description in this paper, as well as what is being done in this schoolhouse in later issues of the newspaper.

By me, Cooke.

[Maybe if the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers like this one are rescanned clearly, the image of the schoolhouse would indeed be clear and we could see the doors, windows, and rooms.

I was not sure if “Rumi kalo” could refer to a “Taro room”. And it seems that at the center on the bottom of the diagram is “Puka komo” for “Entrance”.]

(Nonanona, 7/20/1841, p. 6)

ani; i akaka no hoi...

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 2, Aoao 6. Iulai 20, 1841.