Books in Hawaiian like those written by Jack London, 1923.

Members of the Hawaiian Singing Group

Standing from left to right, Mrs. Andrade; Mrs. Clemens, leader; Mrs. Pahu; Mr. Andrade. Squatting: Mr. O. Pahu; Steven P. Lukua; Mr. Schenck Clemens, manager.

A LETTER FROM A HAWAIIAN BOY FROM AMERICA.

Below you will see the thoughts of a Hawaiian boy by the name of Kiwini Lukua [Steven Lukua], writing to his mother Mrs. Rebecca Lukua of Honolulu nei, describing what his singing group is doing, where they are living in America, and so forth. He has sent many letters, and this below is one of his letters.

“Dear mother, much aloha to you:–Here we are on break, and we are doing better, but our cold are not completely cured; we are still coughing, but not like the previous months. I think within two weeks our colds will probably be over, and maybe we will go sightseeing.

“I have some things I want you to buy for all of us, that is this, six pairs of Japanese sandals [kamaa pale wawae], and send in under my name and I will send you the money for the expenses. Our old Japanese sandals are all shredded up. That is all I want, and do not forget to send send a book related to Hawaii; do not forget to send a book of that type every month, that being a book in Hawaiian like those written by Jack London, etc.; a book written only in Hawaiian.

“I have good friends here who I want to read those books, and I will send you money to cover the cost of those books, because my friends will pay for those books.

“The days here are getting warmer. This place is much like our Manoa. The birds are singing and all the plants and the landscapes are beautiful to see.

The frigid days have gone by and we are happy that we have warm days, and the blooming flowers. Everywhere people are no longer lighting their fireplaces. These days we are staying at home quietly, and each evening, we went exploring for an hour and returned, because our colds are not completely over.

“Here, if someone gets a cold, several months will go by before that cold and sickness is over. This place is strange and not like Honolulu. Here if someone catches a cold, that cold will live in the body until the warm period. And if you catch a cold once again during the warm period, it will be worse. That is the reason we are staying in the house. But the haole tell us that our troubles are over, and so too was what the doctor said. But we wanted to be very sure before going traveling about here and there.

“Everyday, that haole invite us to go to their homes to see them, but we do not accept because we are sick. Here there are haole who went to Honolulu, and each evening, they always come to our hotel to talk with us.

“I am truly tired of living here, because we have many days before we work again. I have the sheet music and am practicing singing, “Hawaiian Rose.” This is a beautiful song.

“Today we are going to see the place with clams, that being olepe, because it is high tide now. The owners of this hotel are taking us to dig for clams; we are paying this hotel an extra charge of $5 for the day. But the hotel owner is reducing it to $3.00 for the day.

“This hotel is nice; there is a bathroom in each room, and we are the only dark-skinned ones in this hotel, because Blacks are not allowed to stay here. The cost to stay here per day is $3.00, added to the cost for meals. And the meals here fine, just like the Moana Hotel.

“Each evening the people dance on top of the Roof Garden without charge. We dance as well because it is fun. The music for the dancing is played by a Jazz Band. I forgot to tell you this, if we live here for two months the manager of the hotel has agreed to give us a monthly rate, that being $15.00 for a month, and we agreed on that rate, because it is very cheap, and he put in a request that we play every Saturday on the Roof Garden during the breaks, and he will pay us $15.00 per night; we are lucky, because we will receive an extra payment of $15.00. We will begin playing in April.

“With these little thoughts, I will conclude. May God guide and watch over us until we meet again.

Your loving son,
STEVEN P. LUKUA,
Happy Hawaii Co., Swarthmore, Penn., Wyoming, Delaware, U. S. A.

(Kuokoa, 5/24/1923, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXII, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 24, 1923.
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The Cyclorama of Kilauea at the Chicago World’s Fair, 1893.

Hawaiian Boys at Chicago.

There are eight Hawaiian singing youths at the Cyclorama of Kilauea the Crater of Pele at Chicago, and it would appear as if they are on their way home with Moeheau [Mooheau] aboard the steamship Monowai, or perhaps aboard the Australia. Mr. Whitney saw and met with them in Chicago a few weeks ago. All of them were in good health, and they sang like the call of lovebirds. And everyone who entered to see the exhibit of the cyclorama of Kilauea crater were very amazed.

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Joseph Puni writes to the father of Diamond Kekona, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN.

Opera House,
Dudley, England,
Nov. 4, 1916.

To my true friend, Dick Kekona,

Aloha oe:–Perhaps you are surprised receiving this letter. I have tried all means to release your beloved son Diamond from the British armed forces. I appeared before the American Consul in the countryside here in England, telling them that Diamond is an American. They responded that they will put my request before the head consul in London. On the 17th of September, I went to the Consulate in London, they told me that the consul could not order the British government to release Diamond because he is 25 years old; only those below 20 years old, if they are American citizens. These past days, I decided to have your daughter-in-law (Amy Kekona) to come to see me, and get together with her to think of a way to release her husband; for these good reasons, I ask that you send me his birth certificate, or to go to the governor of Hawaii to write to the Hawaiian Delegate Mr. J. K. Kalanianaole in Washington D. C., to go to the State Department in Washington and have the American Ambassador in London investigate the circumstances of his enlisting in the armed forces, and you verify that your first-born son is a true Hawaiian. He had a document in the city of Paris, France, from the office of the American General, written on the 13th of February, 1914, attesting to the fact that he is a Hawaiian. If he finds these documents, he will be victorious. Do not neglect this, for I am still regretful not having his acting. He has much knowledge in this area, and his showing this to the world would bring fame to the Hawaiian Lahui. I will organize everything here and send it to London. With our sleuthing, I believe everything will progress; may God watch over and keep safe the life of your child until we meet again, amen.

With aloha to your family and the Hawaiian Nation.

JOSEPH PUNI.

Write me at your daughter-in-law’s, c/o 143 Baxter Ave., Kidderminister, England.

(Aloha Aina, 1/19/1917, p. 3)

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 3, Aoao 3. Ianuari 19, 1917.

Clive Kalani Peter, composer and new leader of Royal Hawaiian Band, 1915.

New Leader of Band Has Written Songs of Hawaii

Peter Kalani, recently appointed leader of the Hawaiian Band to succeed Capt. Henri Berger, has been interested in music since a small boy. Mr. Kalani was born in Honolulu 38 years ago, and as soon as he became strong enough began twanging the strings of the ukulele and the taro-patch. Continue reading

George Palakiko William Hookano celebrates his 71st birthday, 1920.

Ka Hoʻolauleʻa La Hanau no George Palakiko William Hookano
71st Birthday Party for George Hookano
by Thelma Chun, Hoolauleʻa Ukulele Club

The Hoolauleʻa Ukulele Club honored their Advisor-Instructor, “Uncle” George Palakiko William Hookano on his 71st birthday, The event was held on Saturday, January 19,1980, five days prior to his actual birthday. Continue reading

Olivia K. Nakea performs on KGU, 1930.

Quartet Sings Old Hymns of Hawaii For Leper Colony

A  program of sacred Hawaiian music will be heard through KGU this evening from 6:10 to 6:30. A mixed quartet under direction of Olivia Nakea will present the first of a series of  songs for “shut-ins” throughout the territory. Continue reading

Charles E. King critique of “modern” Hawaiian music, 1939.

King Says Hawaiians Ruining Island Music

Venerable Charles E. King, whose Song of the Islands is among the most widely known of all Hawaiian music, pulled no punches in a talk before the Hawaiian Civic club today on modern  day treatment of island songs.

“Hawaiian music,” said Mr. King, speaking at the club luncheon at the YWCA at noon, “is being murdered—and by Hawaiians.” Continue reading