Kumalae ukulele in Canada, 1918.

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Jonah Kumalae’s ukulele are a hit across America, 1915.

THE DEMAND FOR UKULELE IS GREAT

According to news from San Francisco, the ukulele [pila ki-ka ukulele] is in great demand from all over America, because it was heard first-hand by thousands of visitors heard the ukulele being played at an exposition in San Francisco [Panama-Pacific International Exposition].

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Hawaiian musicians go abroad, 1920.

THE SINGING OF THESE HAWAIIANS IS MOVING FORWARD

The photo above is of a group of Hawaiian singers taken to America, and they are in Canada at the moment, as per what Steven Lukua Matthew told Mrs. Rebecca Lukua, his mother here in Honolulu. There are six of them, and they are all Hawaiians, and their names are: the boys, Steven Lukua Matthew, John J. Matthew, and Kahaia Pahu; and the women are Kuuleipoinaole [Ida Alicante], Ane Hila, and Kamaka Pahu. Continue reading

Diamond Kekona plays ukulele in London, 1919.

STRUMS UKULELE IN FOGGY LONDON

Diamond Kekona, one of the five Hawaiians with “The Bird of Paradise” playing a two-year contract.

It’s a far cry from Piccadilly Circus, London, to Honolulu, but the faithful reproduction of a former life in the Hawaiian islands as depicted in Richard Walton  Tully’s “Bird of Paradise” is charming Britons who seek a welcome change from fog and storm. Continue reading

Hawaiian boys playing music in Siberia, 1920.

Hawaiian Minstrels Play For Siberian Wolfhounds

This Hawaiian quartet has just returned after touring Siberia and the far east entertaining Uncle Sam’s doughboys under the auspices of the Knights of Columbus. Left to right —John Oku, Charles Dement (leader), John Hickey and Edward Hanapi. The four left here last November. They played in Japan, Siberia, China and the Philippines. They remained in Vladivostok after the American soldiers had departed and the Japanese had taken over the city. Continue reading

Edward H. Hanapi, Jr. in Asia writes home, 1920.

Hawaiian Youths in  Siberia

To My Dear Papa

From when we left Honolulu until we reached Japan, I have been reminiscing about you and younger brother, Emperor. The first port we entered was Nagasaki in Japan, which is the port which American ships regularly enter; and from this port we went to Vladivostok. While in Nagasaki, I sent a postcard, and perhaps you have received it. In the month of February, I sent $100; I have not received a response from you, papa. I am sending another $75 by bank draft; tell me if you receive this money. Siberia is a cold land, and we have everything we need. When we arrived in this land, we were well taken care of by the group “Knights of Columbus.” Continue reading

“Haaheo Kilohana i ka Lai,” 1952.

FRAGRANT MEMORY—In memory of the late Mrs. C. M. Cooke, who founded the Honolulu Academy of Arts 25 years ago, this group of Hawaiian women will sing and play “Haaheo Kilohana i ka Laʻi” at tonight’s opening of the Academy Members’ Annual Show from 8 to 10. The song was composed for Mrs. Cooke by Mary Jane F. Monatno. It was set to music by Mrs. Bina Mossman. Shown above are: left to right, Louise Akeo Silva, Flora Hayes, Julia Nui Hoopili; back row, Joanna Wilcox, Kuualoha Treadway and Bina Mossman.—Academy photo.

(Star-Bulletin, 2/27/1952, p. 22)

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Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume LVIII, Number 18548, Page 22. February 27, 1952.

Concert in Hilo for the Ida Pope Memorial fund, 1920.

IDA POPE MEMORIAL CONCERT OFFERS RARE ATTRACTION TONIGHT

Assisted by the Kamehameha Boys’ Glee Club, which arrived on the Mauna Kea, together with the other cadets of the school this morning alumane and alumni of Kamehameha offer a concert for the benefit of the Pope Memorial fund tonight. The concert will take place at the Yuraku-Kwan theater. In addition to the Kamehameha boys, the Haili banner-winning choir, which also returned today, will sing some of the songs that helped to win the palm. Continue reading

La Hoihoi Ea, 1891.

RESTORATION DAY

The 31st of July is restoration day, and the Minister of the Interior [Kuhina Kalaiaina] announced that that 31st of this month will be held as a national holiday from one end to the other end of the land. But it is heard that the Queen will leave this royal town to stay somewhere very far away from the center of the nation. Continue reading