James Hay Wodehouse says, “Put those American flags in a bag!” 1893.

The Flag Still There.

In the Hawaiian News Company’s establishment this morning, Major Wodehouse, the British Minister, advised a clerk to “put those American flags in a bag.” Continue reading

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Faith, 1893.

THE HAWAIIAN PEOPLE.

The Hawaiian people have faith in the righteousness and the justice of the Americans; therefore they have great trust that Minister Willis will come and make right the outrageous offense that Minister Stevens and Captain Wiltse committed against this upright peoples. Therefore the Americans will dispense justice for Hawaii in 1893 just as Great Britain did too in 1843. Continue reading

Patriots celebrate La Hoihoi Ea in lands afar! 1862.

[For the Kuokoa.]

Hoihoi Ea Banquet

FOR THE HAWAIIAN NATION, ON THE 31st OF JULY, 1862.

The 31st of July is a day celebrated by the Hawaiian Nation because it is the day on which the sovereignty of the land was restored, from the year 1843 until this year in which it is remembered. Therefore, we, the natives of Hawaii who live in this strange land, because of our aloha for our land of birth, make this a day of remembrance and a day of prayer, setting aside our labors.

This is what was done on that day: Before that day, food was purchased, and in the morning of that day, the food was cooked first, and all the food was assembled on a table that was covered with the green foliage of the Puluki;¹ and when the conch was sounded, the fellow diners came and sat upon their own seats. Then L. H. Kapuaa stood and spoke of the nature of activities of the day; before the singing. This is one of the songs composed by the youths of the Snow Flurry [na keiki o ka Ehu Hau]. This is it below.

  1. Aloha i ka aina,
    I ke one hanau,
    O ke ao lewa he inoa,
    O ka Haku ka Moi,
    Na keiki kamaaina,
    Na pua ala mau,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau  hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  2. Nolaila e na hoa,
    E ku a mele pu,
    Hauoli like kakou,
    Ma keia waoakua,
    Ua nui na la i hala,
    Aole kakou i hoomanao,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  3. O Thomas ka mama,
    Ma na ale o ke kai,
    A hiki ma Hawaii,
    Kuka me ka Moi,
    Me na Luna Aupuni,
    Holo ke kuikahi,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  4. Hoopauia o Lokeoki,
    Hoi nele aku ia,
    Ka moana Pakipika,
    Hauoli Hawaii,
    I ka la hope o Iulai,
    Ala ae kakou,
    Ua hoihoi mai ka ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.
    .
  5. E ala e na keiki,
    O ka Ehu Hau,
    Mele me ka hauoli,
    Hoonani ke Akua,
    Nana kokua mai,
    Ka ea o ka aina,
    Ua hoihoi mai ke ea,
    Kau hou ka Hae Hawaii.

Continue reading

23 years of independence, La Kuokoa, 1866.

Independence Day of Hawaii nei.—This past Wednesday, the 28th of November, was the day that the Nation of Hawaii gained its independence from the other power of the nations of Britain and France. On that day in the year 1843, the great powers of Britain and France joined together to discuss the bestowing of independence on this Nation, and the two of them agreed to this and we gained this independence. The great island of Australia under the power of Great Britain, but as for us, we are overjoyed, and can boast that we are amongst the few Independent Nations under the sun. There are many islands like us, who live peacefully under the powers over them, but Hawaii lives clearly without any power placed above its head. Therefore the commemoration by the Hawaiian hearts from the East to the West of these islands on this day, is not a small thing, but it is important, and we know by heart the foundational words of our Nation. “E mau ke ea o ka aina i ka pono.” The gaining of this Independence, was not by the point of a sword or the mouth of a gun, but was gotten peacefully, and upon He who sits on the great Throne is our efforts and great trust, and so let us not be mistaken that the drinking of intoxicating drinks is what preserves our Independence, that is not the case. The past Wednesday was the 23rd year of our commemoration. 21 shots were fired from the hill of Puowina [aka Puowaina], and the day went on peacefully from morning until night.

(Kuokoa, 12/1/1866, p. 3)

Ka La Kuokoa o Hawaii nei.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 48, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 1, 1866.

More on Restoration Day, 1843.

“THE VICTORY OF WRONGDOERS IS BUT FOR A MOMENT.”

Who does not know the truth of this statement? He must read the Bible; it is there that he will see the truth in this statement. What of Pharaoh [Parao], the ruler of Egypt [Aigupita], the one who overburdened and oppressed the Israelites? Did he not die at once, along with all of his warriors in the Red Sea? And with his quick death in the Red Sea, what happened to Moses and his people? Did they not sing, exalt, rejoice, and praise God for his saving them from the hands of their enemy? Read Exodus [Pukaana] chapter 14 and chapter 15, and there it will be clarified.

[Considering this particular outcome, this was quite a boost for Christianity.]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 27)

"O KA LANAKILA O KA POE HEWA, HE POKOLE IA."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 27. Augate 8, 1843.

Richard Thomas arrives today, 1843.

WARSHIP.

On the 26th of July, the British Warship named Dublin arrived. Read Admiral Thomas is the Captain. He is the commander-in-chief of the British Warships here in the Pacific Ocean.

When he received the document about Capt. Lord George Paulet, by way of the ship Victoria, and he heard clearly that the flag of Britain was raised at this archipelago, he quickly came to restore the kingdom to Kamehameha III. How wonderful indeed is his aloha for the king! and for the people as well.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

Captain Charles G. Nottage arrives, 1893.

[Found under: “LOCAL AND GENERAL.”]

Captain Nottage arrived on the Mariposa. He intends to remain here for some weeks visiting the different points of interest. He is the owner of the crack yacht Deerhound which has won about sixty-two cups.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 1/12/1893, p. 3)

Captain Nottage Arrived...

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XVII, Number 3275, Page 3. January 12, 1893.